[x] work ▶

Sentences that have work in common :


So far Evelin Brosi, AMVK and JODI will show up to get informed about matters of relevance and will then start to produce their floppy work for the collection from there.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Fri 12 Jan 2018 20:30 @ Paradiso, Amsterdam 'PARA-PHONIC POLY-DISO' BY REMCO VAN BLADEL On this day the work 'Para-phonic Poly-diso' will be launched at The Small Museum of Paradiso, Amsterdam.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


This work, developed for The Small Museum project at Paradiso, is part of 'Pushing Scores' – a research project by DE PLAYER in connection with Remco van Bladel about the current state and potential of the 'graphical score'.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


The work is voiced by Laetitia Saedier of Stereolab.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Every aspect of his work deals with the quality of sound.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


For this event he will work with a film projection and a synthesizer, which he influences with his brainwaves.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


At every level of detail, the everyday sound of our urban surroundings is the focus of his work.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


His studio work focuses on editorial book design, publishing projects, curatorial projects, institutional identities, interactive applications and websites.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


I already knew the work of Charlemagne and we had also met during earlier events, so it was instantly clear that we could do something together that would make sense for the exhibition and ourselves.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Rafaël Rozendaal showed his web work 'Slow Empty', which functioned as real-time clockwork for the event.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Because his work is pretty conceptual, you could say that there is always a strategy (call it a score) that operates as a framework underpinning his artistic output.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


We had previously worked with Kris Delacourt on 'Principium 2.0', which is a reinterpretation of Colson’s work 'Principium', and so it was a natural progression that we then asked Colson to work on a sound publication with us.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


It is a complex work that nevertheless manages to remain simple and accessible in its final execution.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


In his work, Colson constantly questions the relationship with the audience and is also strongly interested in mythology and the authentic (or not) mystique of the artist's existence, which he usually explores in his performances.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


The process is always important, but the end result, which is variable for Colson and influenced by the context, is an important part of his work.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Vaast Colson asked Remörk to reinterpret his work 'Principium', which was a joyful (but strictly ruled) play with sticky coloured dots.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


For it, Kris Delacourt (Remörk) had made a modified Casio keyboard as a reinterpretation of Vaast Colson's work 'Principium'.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And at a certain point he posed something like: 'I've made some work that might be interesting to use as a score, would you be up for it?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


How do you decide which parts 'work' on an album, and which don't?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Sometimes I preferred elements because of harmonic information, notes that work well together, sometimes because of rhythms that worked well, etc.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


He always stressed, right from the start, that any interpretation I gave of his work was no longer his work.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But musically, I still feel it’s my work.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


We eventually asked Derek Holzer because of his work with tonewheels, but it was not logistically possible to facilitate this type of performance.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In 1989 the 'Broken Music' exhibition was held in Berlin at DAAD gallery with work by, among others, Nam June Paik, John Cage, Milan Knížák and Christian Marclay.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


HELGA JAKOBSON (CA) Whether culminating in actions or objects, Helga Jakobson's work responds to conditions of limbo within existence and acts as a platform to confront the unknown, focusing on death, time and ephemerality.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The main threads that run between these interests are the experience of women, their traditional work and their sharing of knowledge.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Jakobson has great reverence for intuition and it's use as a technology within her work.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Karina Dukalska, for example, created a work entitled 'Rock Step Triple Step'.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Her work is a personal exploration of the possibilities afforded by articulated hard- and software mediation.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


The work consists of two parts: 1.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


An interactive graphic score/light box/kinetic work fixed inside the cabinet, and 2.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


The work was installed for a period at The Small Museum – a cabinet on the facade of Paradiso, Amsterdam.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


We knew that Remco had written an essay called 'Musical Theories in Graphic Design' – on the subject of graphic notation within a broader field of theory formation in contemporary music – and felt it would be a good match to work together on a research project about the graphic score.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


He also engaged with work from Stockhausen and Cage, working comparatively to assess differences and find similarities.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


This was not about hard comparisons and one-to-one projection, but more to interpret, think and work with elements.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


His artistic practice is formed by a number of ingredients that have always been present in his work to a greater or lesser extent.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


We became familiar with the work of Derek Holzer through his project on tonewheels – an experiment in converting graphical imagery to sound, inspired by some of the pioneering twentieth century electronic music inventions.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


In it he considers it axiomatic that, for every work of art that must be considered experimental, the possibility of failure must be built into its process.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


Many artists try to eliminate true, catastrophic failures by scripting, scoring, sequencing or programming their work in as many predictable, risk-free quantums as possible in advance.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


It draws on the historical work of artists such as Mary Ellen Bute, John Whitney, Nam June Paik, Ben Laposky and Steina & Woody Vasulka, among many others, as well as on ideas of media archaeology and the creative reuse of obsolete technologies.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


Figures such as Heinz von Foerster, Gordon Pask, Nam June Paik, Steina & Woody Vasulka, Iannis Xenakis and R. Buckminster Fuller all speculated on the effect of computers on society, and used computer-derived forms in their work.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


This work was performed at St. Vincent College under the direction of Stephen Joy with Roman Verostko assisting in 1963.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


The fact that the work is purely language-based also hones in on our interest, as DE PLAYER has been publishing and presenting a lot of sound poetry over the years.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


For example, his work 'frakativ' is an electronic visual sound poetry performance.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


For 'Pushing Scores', we invited him to make special work for a limited edition.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


The packaging of each record is also linked to the unique file and consists of an original visual work that is derived from or transformed via a formula from the programming language that underlies the audio poems present on the record.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


They had been performing before we started the 'Pushing Scores' project, yet we nevertheless claim their work to be part of it.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


The idea of 'anitation' and the work of Guðmundur Steinn Gunnarsson fits perfectly within 'Pushing Scores'.
└ from 22 — Anitation


His work is described as conceptual music.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


His work/action 'Product Placements', which helped to discuss copyright and the level of creation in music, was widely spread.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


This is close to his work ‘Charts Music’, in which he used the share prices of various companies to derive pitches.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


For another work he commissioned composers from low-wage countries to plagiarise his own music for a commission for the Festival Klangwerkstatt in Berlin.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Her archival approach and its political and personal implications are the starting point of this work.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


We became acquainted with Helga Jakobson's work through Bas van den Hurk, who at the time of introduction was teaching on the postgraduate program that Helga took part in at St Joost.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


ORE by BJ Nilsen This work by BJ Nilsen can be seen as an observing documentary and is related to time-lapse filmmaking.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


This line is interrupted a few times and the different time periods work together and overlap.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In this way, the work creates a third space that belongs to the individual listener and that arises from the interaction between the original space and the imaginary space, created by the composition, the sound processing and the perception of the listener.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


This mining work is tied directly to the computer age, itself an alchemic expression of man's ingenious use of the earth.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The work creates a third space that belongs to the individual listener and which arises from the interaction between the original space and imaginary space, created through the composition and sound processing… We dig deep into the earth to get to layers of deep time, extract it and use the ancient material, in the case of coal, for electricity, for heating the house, commodities, to type a message on a phone.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


You can only survive there if you work with nature.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


If you work against it, it will kill you.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Duncan's work has a lasting influence on experimental music because his art is generally still refined and refined, and he regularly collaborates with young artists.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


During an evening at the Varia collective, where Valentia Vuksic and Ana Guedes also played a live set and explained their work and backgrounds, Niek Hilkmann, who is part of the Varia team, presented his Universal Notation Ideal (UNI) – a Pay2Print research into the simultaneous production and distribution of standardised graphic scores by means of an automatic machine.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


Though the two are unrelated in origin, the concept of impossible piano existed long before black MIDI, manifesting itself within Conlon Nancarrow's work involving player pianos, where he punched holes in piano cards to create extremely complex musical compositions in the same impossible, unplayable spirit of black MIDI.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Fusinato presents himself here in the guise of a worker, clocking on and unceremoniously clocking off at the end of the day, refusing to allow the behind-the-scenes mystery of rehearsals and preparations to lend an aura to the performance, and affirming the deskilled ethos of his work.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


As most of his work engages with highly political issues, we invited him to do a performance within the context of the event 'MUSIC & CAPITALISM'.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Where people would normally be doing their office work, Marco now played for eight hours in the empty office building.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Marco Fusinato is a contemporary artist and musician whose work has taken the form of installation, photographic reproduction, performance and recording.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Serial in form, each work uses an existing cultural document – a twentieth or twenty-first century avant-garde music score – as the formal, material and conceptual basis for a set of actions or interventions.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Fusinato's intervention into the scores therefore visualises and proposes the possibility of a dialectical energy running through the original work that has a political dimension as much as an artistic one – a relentless propensity to both destruction and expressive creation in the single action, or, in this case, to the production of noise.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


a b o u t t h i s a r c h i v e
l i s t o f i t e m s
G e n e r a t e s c o r e !