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Fri 22 Jun 2018 20:30 @ DE PLAYER, Rotterdam 'E-ARTHHA' WITH DOUGLAS KAHN, BJ NILSEN, AURÉLIE LIERMAN AND MAX FRANKLIN As you may well know, there are those evenings after which the sun rises differently.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


In his lecture, Douglas Kahn discards old categories of sound and performance and replaces them with a new category of ‘energy’, which operates within the bigger narratives of ecology and other sensitivities.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


This project, which focuses on what we have come to refer to as the ‘graphic score’, has been running over the last two to three years.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


What are the possibilities of the graphic score in a day and age in which graphic notation is still commonly seen as 'drawing', merely serving as some kind of sheet music?
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


What are the possibilities of the graphic score, in a day and age in which graphic notation is still commonly seen as 'drawing', merely serving as some kind of sheet music?
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


In an attempt to redefine this concept, we will be compiling a programme in which artists, musicians, theoreticians and practitioners are invited to participate.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


The incentive for this project is the belief that graphic notation in twentieth-century avant-garde music and sound art constitutes an important, still radically innovative but wrongfully marginalised form, which can play a key role in the development of new audiovisual languages and media.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


The result is a combination of several media, which all coexist in a designed concrete object.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


During the performance, which lasted for several hours, visitors could freely join, listen and pose questions to the artist, Remörk (a.k.a.
└ from 03 — Principium 2.0 Presentation


For this event he will work with a film projection and a synthesizer, which he influences with his brainwaves.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Nevertheless, he showed me some books he once made in New York, which he said were to be seen as musical scores.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


They are cheap dummy books, onto which he poured ink in several colors.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


These books were the starting point for curating the event, which subsequently sat within our 'Pushing Scores' project.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Rafaël Rozendaal showed his web work 'Slow Empty', which functioned as real-time clockwork for the event.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Floris Vanhoof played a set during which he used his brainwaves to influence his synthesizer sounds, combining this with a projection and a laserbeam.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Carlson invents, Colson presents: 99 spines produced on a modified Canon IR2016 copy machine' by Vaast Colson, produced on a 'prepared copier' At the 2016 WIELS Art Book Fair we presented this live-made, copy-zine by Vaast Colson named 'Carlson invents, Colson presents: 99 spines produced on a modified Canon IR2016 copy machine', which was produced on a 'prepared copier'.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


The copy machine was amplified by several internal microphones, through which the sound of every print run was recorded.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


We had previously worked with Kris Delacourt on 'Principium 2.0', which is a reinterpretation of Colson’s work 'Principium', and so it was a natural progression that we then asked Colson to work on a sound publication with us.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


He came up with the idea of the Xerox copier, which within a single contained print run makes in an audio recording, a booklet and a printed image.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


In his work, Colson constantly questions the relationship with the audience and is also strongly interested in mythology and the authentic (or not) mystique of the artist's existence, which he usually explores in his performances.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


The process is always important, but the end result, which is variable for Colson and influenced by the context, is an important part of his work.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


His works, which are regularly made in situ, are often difficult to sell.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Vaast Colson asked Remörk to reinterpret his work 'Principium', which was a joyful (but strictly ruled) play with sticky coloured dots.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Principium 2.0' comes in the form of twelve records and this magnetic application, which follows very elementary rules – some old, some new.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Together, all twelve records form the complete set, which one 'game' requires.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The funny thing is that after the presentation at Stadslimiet, the recordings of this eight-hour performance were edited back to a 12" vinyl record, which was released by the label Ultra Eczema shortly after.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Colson used tiny paper sticker dots, the kind that most art galleries use to denote which works in a show have been sold.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And so, he went on to design 'Principium 1.0'; a magnetic board with the same field as the sticker sheets, which he activated with magnets as a synthesizer.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: I've been following the 'Principium' story on your blog, which dates back to the summer of 2012, so four years ago.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


He made these beautiful pieces where he used tiny paper sticker dots, you know the ones that most art galleries use to denote which works in a show have been sold?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Line segments which he reassembled into new shapes and new lines.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


For example, there's this box set which has records that have built-in radio transmitters, records with impossible shapes where you need to turn the stylus of your record player upside down.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


So we put two and two together, and ended up doing twelve 10" lathe cuts (which came in a box with those electronic switches), with eight magnets each as based on the original grid and a 12" metal platter to sit under the 10" for the magnets to stick to.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I decided to stop worrying, which after two years of doubting might not be such a bad thing, and did a ten-minute improvised recording on organ and MS20, playing only C notes.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Basically, the program decided for me which records to play, whether to repeat them or not when they were finished, whether to leave the turntable empty, whether the electronics should punch holes in the sound when a magnet was detected or the opposite, how may magnets on each turntable and the playback volume.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The only thing I had any control over was where to put the magnets, which determines the rhythm.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


How do you decide which parts 'work' on an album, and which don't?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I think I ended up with five or six pieces that I though could hold their own on a record, four of which made the final cut.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


If you stick to the concept, you miss out on the creative aspect, which should be the most important part.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It can make you go against your natural inclinations, which does not always have to be a bad thing.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


What are the possibilities of graphic scores, in a day and age in which graphic notation is still commonly seen as a 'drawing', merely serving as some kind of sheet music?
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In an attempt to redefine this concept, we will be compiling a programme in which artists, musicians, theoreticians and practitioners are invited to participate.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Incorporated into the structure of the book are sensors and electronics, providing each page with its own unique soundtrack, which can be listened to via speakers or headphones.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Incorporated into the structure of the book are sensors and electronics, providing each page with its own unique soundtrack, which can be listened to via speakers or headphones.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


As production, meaning here productive creation, above all serves the human condition, we must attempt to further our purposes of creative production through the uses of those apparatuses or methods which until now have been used only for reproduction purposes.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The outcomes ranged from installations to be played by the public to plastic works in which the plate was transformed, mutated.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


For a certain period we regularly took part in ART Rotterdam – an annual art fair in which commercial galleries and artist-run initiatives take part.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


His performances have been described as surrealist puppet theatre in which the characters are amplified objects such as old tools, kitchen utensils, toys, springs and decorative kitsch.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The concept of the course revolves around two core principles: First, the inquiry into the technological, political and cultural processes through which things are made public; and second, the desire to expand the notion of publishing beyond print media and its direct digital translation.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Piet Zwart Institute > TGC#3, Seminar + Live Event: Together with the team of the Experimental Publishing course at the Piet Zwart Institute, a seminar was organised for the students over a period of three months during which the principles of 'Pushing Scores' took the lead.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


A publication was taken as a joint focal point, the form of which could be determined in more detail.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Designed as a concrete object in which various techniques are incorporated, its core consists of a floppy drive and a Raspberry Pi platform, on which a local WiFi station, a camera, an audio in/output, touch sensors and LED lighting are realised.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Whether it is about recording movements for archiving, or writing new choreographies for the future, she concentrated on which elements of dance are overwritable (such as direction or footwork) and which are not.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


What are the possibilities of graphic scores, in a day and age in which graphic notation is still usually seen as a 'drawing', merely serving as some kind of sheet music?
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


The idea is that this material will be embodied by a dynamic, accessible and therefore active archive, which creates new relations, new perspectives and, at its best, new concepts for the production and/or processes of making scores.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


Valentina Vuksic will also bring a live performance in which she approaches computers with transducers that transform electromagnetic radiation into sound within choreographed setups.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


She played a set in which she used her computer to generate sound by live programming.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


Software being processed creates its own temporal and spatial dimensions, which are staged for a public.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


The Small Museum, which was previously used to house the public announcements of the church, will be transformed into a local WiFi hotspot to stream a multi vocal 'Pa-Ra-Di-So Rapsodia' – a live algorithmic choir composition created through the phones that connected to the WiFi, and therefore the score, while waiting to enter the building.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


As far as melody is concerned, humming was increasingly defined by the expansion of the number of lines, which first corresponded by colour and later by keys to certain steps in the medieval ranges.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


In the middle of the thirteenth century, Peter de Cruce came to a notation in which the relative duration of each note is indicated by the form of the note.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


It was particularly of interested to us because of the way in which he focuses on the reproduction of music.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


What kind of scores can be made with the myriad of new techniques and media that have been developed since Attali's writing, and which are definitely influential on our conceptual thinking of music and its reproduction.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


He wrote the book 'Noise: The Political Economy of Music', which is one of the inspirations for our project 'Pushing Scores'.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


The argument of 'Noise' is that music, unique among the arts for reasons that are themselves overdetermined, has precisely this annunciatory vocation; that the music of today stands both as a promise of a new, liberating mode of production, and as the menace of a dystopian possibility – which stands as that mode of production's baleful mirror image.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


The subjective nature, the way in which vibrations can release such strong emotions, makes it possible to deal speculatively and to use them for use in typography, image, material choices, folding methods and bookbinding systems.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


In 2011, Derek Holzer wrote an essay on this issue, which has since been published on the Internet as a downloadable PDF called 'VAGUE TERRAIN 19'.
└ from 15 — Schematic as Design


They then explored Lissajous figures, waveform representations and other multiplexed, audio-driven visual shapes and forms which can be displayed and manipulated in real-time on an XY oscilloscope, Vectrex game console, ILDA laser display and other analogue vector displays, or with oscilloscope emulating software directly on a laptop.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


This gave birth to the realtime-controllable, analogue modular synthesizer, which was subsequently expanded by others such as Bob Moog and Serge Tcherepnin.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


One of the originators of 'participatory art', in which the artwork can only be experienced by the active involvement of the viewer, he is most famous for his 'Event Scores', such as 'Drip Music' (1962), and is widely seen as an important precursor to conceptual art.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


The way in which he arrives at his poetry is very closely linked to his knowledge and skills of the programming language.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


In addition to the all-dominating impact of the music industry, which determines lifestyle at the level of confection, all sorts of de-mass-splintering genres are forming on the periphery of the musical firmament.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


The limits of speech become communication and nonsense, which both have the potential of speech.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


This idea is closely intertwined with the project 'Pushing Scores', in which the materialisation of sound plays a role.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


Listening in the sense of 'Radical Listening' is therefore not only about ears specifically, but generally about exploring our world, our position in it and the way in which communication is possible.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


He gave a lecture on this subject and played several pieces with Daniel S. Bøtcher, Grøn, Nynne Roberta Pedersen, amongst which some were by Gunnarsson.
└ from 22 — Anitation


A few examples appeal to the imagination with regard to how a score can be understood and which elements and/or processes can play a role in this.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


His work/action 'Product Placements', which helped to discuss copyright and the level of creation in music, was widely spread.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In a thirty-three second piece, he processed 70,200 quotations of foreign works, all of which he submitted individually via forms to the German Buma Stemra (GEMA).
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


The music production facility is consciously located in a legal grey area, which has been greatly enlarged by digital technologies.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


This is close to his work ‘Charts Music’, in which he used the share prices of various companies to derive pitches.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


His way of composing has a multimedia conceptual approach, which is mostly linked with processes in society.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Following this, we also produced a record with him, which contains one piece of his named 'Product Placements'.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In September 2008 a piece of press advertised his action ‘Product Placements’, with which he wanted to initiate a discussion on copyright and the height of creation in music.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


The plant is deliberately located in a legal gray area, which has been greatly enlarged by digital technologies, so that it is impossible to clarify the case so far.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


The multi-arm record players, on which several timelines can be played, intertwine the juxtaposition of temporalities and imagined narratives trapped within the collection.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


Also the way in which she approaches the technical implementation of possibilities to program the record players is interesting, especially regarding, for example, the idea of 'schematics as a score'.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


Her research often leads her to short-lived and organic material with which she develops new systems and methods for engagement.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


She presented her project entitled 'Arachnes Sonifier', in which she captures and makes audible spider webs.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


Her spider web record player, which she developed for this purpose, is an instrument that plays, registers and converts a spider web into sound by means of light sensors.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


This strange, affective relay continues into the recording process, which results in the interpreted sound of an interpreted web.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


In searching I began imagining where I would make a web, and then marvelling when I would find one in the most unlikely place, which only enchants me further into the world of spiders and webs and mythology.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


We had an appointment and it was immediately clear that this project was of interest to us and we decided to present her prototype at an event in which other inventive ways of sound making were presented.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


There is a small tribute to Groupe de recherches Musicales (GRM) in Paris and Pierre Henry, which is directly related to iron ore.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The work creates a third space that belongs to the individual listener and which arises from the interaction between the original space and imaginary space, created through the composition and sound processing… We dig deep into the earth to get to layers of deep time, extract it and use the ancient material, in the case of coal, for electricity, for heating the house, commodities, to type a message on a phone.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It's not like wind or the sun, which give you immediate energy.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The record can thus be considered as a potential composition, which is performed by the listener themselves through the aforementioned process.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


In an ongoing performance unexpected correlations will be produced between the items in the archive and the physical surroundings in which they are represented.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


We know Varia as a community based initiative which combines several knowledge bases in the interdisciplinary filed of music, programming, publishing, hacking, social interventions and critical positions, among others.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


The idea is that this material will be embodied by a dynamic, accessible and therefore active archive, which creates new relations, new perspectives and, at its best, new concepts for the production and/or processes of making scores.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


The UNI was developed by Niek Hilkmann and Joseph Knierzinger, and it is a machine into which a coin is inserted and from which a printed score is then delivered.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


This is an interesting process in which boundaries can be explored and in which the idea of 'cracked media' – whose performers challenge the intended effect of the technology and actively use alternative acts through subversive acts of abuse and misconception to generate results – is an interesting one.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


They also formed the sites 'Guide to Black MIDI' and 'Official Black MIDI Wikia', which introduced and set the norm of black MIDI.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The number of notes and the sizes of the playback files have grown with the rising amount of processing and 64-bit programs, which computers are now able to handle.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The two largest black MIDIs are 'Armageddon v3' and 'TheTrueEnd', both of which contain the maximum number of notes allowed in the MIDI standard (about ninty-three trillion).
└ from 30 — Black Midi


According to California-based blacker TheTrustedComputer, black MIDI was intended as more of a remix style than an actual genre, and derived from the idea of 'bullet hell' shoot 'em up games, which involved 'so many bullets at a time your eyes can't keep up.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Black MIDI has also been considered the digital equivalent, as well as a response to composer Conlon Nancarrow's use of the player piano, which also involved experimenting with several thick notes to compose intricate pieces without hands.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


One of these labels was Circle Records, which had been up and running for a few years, headed by John Nixon, Julian Dashper and Marc Fusinato.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


People were guided to the eighth floor and into the directors room, which was darkened with newspapers stacked on the windows.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


This is the energy of implosion, which always infers at least the potential of its counter-energy in explosive energy radiating out from the single point of origin.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


a b o u t t h i s a r c h i v e
l i s t o f i t e m s
G e n e r a t e s c o r e !