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Sentences that have was in common :


DE PLAYER was asked by the XPUB programme of Piet Zwart Institute to do a seminar during a three-month period with their students.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


One restriction was decided upon: The scores had to be presented on floppy disc.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


This was put in place to both limit possibilities and to unite the format.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


‘Fred Flintstone meets the twenty-first century’, it was referred to as.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


I already knew the work of Charlemagne and we had also met during earlier events, so it was instantly clear that we could do something together that would make sense for the exhibition and ourselves.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


The ink was absorbed by the books and, after drying, it turned out to be a series of morphing colours that shifted with each page turn.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Yann Gourdon was asked to do a hurry-curdy noisette while Charlemagne's books were projected page by page on the wall.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Carlson invents, Colson presents: 99 spines produced on a modified Canon IR2016 copy machine' by Vaast Colson, produced on a 'prepared copier' At the 2016 WIELS Art Book Fair we presented this live-made, copy-zine by Vaast Colson named 'Carlson invents, Colson presents: 99 spines produced on a modified Canon IR2016 copy machine', which was produced on a 'prepared copier'.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


The copy machine was amplified by several internal microphones, through which the sound of every print run was recorded.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Each run of ninty-nine copies (the maximum run of the machine) was printed on transparent foil and is now accompanied by a foil cover with the dub-cut audio file in it.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


We had previously worked with Kris Delacourt on 'Principium 2.0', which is a reinterpretation of Colson’s work 'Principium', and so it was a natural progression that we then asked Colson to work on a sound publication with us.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Vaast Colson asked Remörk to reinterpret his work 'Principium', which was a joyful (but strictly ruled) play with sticky coloured dots.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


We showed this piece by Remörk at ART Rotterdam and then I asked Kris if he was willing to make a publication of it, meaning a record.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


He was intrigued by the invitation, but it took a long time to develop.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


This was quite a process but it eventually resulted in a beautiful limited edition of twelve pieces, developed and designed in collaboration between Kris and the team of DE PLAYER.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It was presented at Stadslimiet, Antwerp, as an installation piece on 2 Jul 2015.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The funny thing is that after the presentation at Stadslimiet, the recordings of this eight-hour performance were edited back to a 12" vinyl record, which was released by the label Ultra Eczema shortly after.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's just that Kris Delacourt was so intrigued by the leftover sticker sheets, with their eight by twelve grid they just screamed 'SEQUENCER!
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


As mentioned, the first version was a modified Casio keyboard.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The idea was to put white magnets atop of the coloured dots as a way to blank them out.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The interview was conducted after he exhibited 'Principium 2.0' in an installation setting at Stadslimiet, Antwerp.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Short version: First it was a one octave Casio keyboard, then it became twelve 10" records, then it became an eight hour performance and eventually now a 12" LP.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


What he did was draw a bunch of random lines across the sticker sheets, and since there are eight by twelve stickers on a sheet you end up with stickers with tiny line segments drawn on them.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Anyway, Vaast was putting together a show where other people would do reinterpretations of some of his works, and around the same time we had a nice chat about alternative musical scores, graphic scores and what not.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The funny thing was that he thought his resulting collages would be nice to use as scores – and they probably would be – but it's just that I was so intrigued by the leftover sticker sheets, with their eight by twelve grid that just screamed 'SEQUENCER!
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And the first version was indeed a modified Casio keyboard.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The idea was to put white magnets on top of the coloured dots to blank them out, so you end up with something analogous to taking a sticker off the sheet – a white space in a field of colour.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I was really happy with the results, and especially with the fact that it's so inviting towards an audience.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The next step was when Peter Fengler of DEPLAYER/DOB Records said he wanted to do a record with the Casio version.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The first hesitation was that the Casio version really works best through audience interaction – people moving magnets around, changing the sounds on the keyboard and so on.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And I don't mind a good concept now and then, but I guess I'm too much of a musician, so I went for what was more appealing to me musically.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


That same ten-minute piece was then sped up for the other notes, going up in pitch and becoming shorter for each record.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Basically, the program decided for me which records to play, whether to repeat them or not when they were finished, whether to leave the turntable empty, whether the electronics should punch holes in the sound when a magnet was detected or the opposite, how may magnets on each turntable and the playback volume.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The only thing I had any control over was where to put the magnets, which determines the rhythm.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Funny thing was that we’d agreed to let it run until 23:00, and at about two minutes to then I got the first ever instruction to leave all the turntables empty.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


That was an amazing moment.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Why was that?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


What was the problem?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I guess that fear was much more of an issue with DOB Records.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I guess my main fear was that by cutting chunks out of a much larger whole, you risk losing the context – and I'm still not sure what this record sounds like to people that weren't there.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I thought it worked really well as a performance, but I wanted to make sure it was good enough to be a record.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


If something was interesting for a while, but didn't stay interesting, it had to go.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And that was never the question either.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It was continually shifting, so it didn't really have a beginning or an end – you could drop in any time you liked.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But it was pretty intense, so yes, this record is probably the light version.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: I guess there was the point where I decided to just do a ten-minute organ improvisation, that was a bit of a turning point.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It really was a one-time event, with the vinyls functioning as a tool, yes.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


He always stressed, right from the start, that any interpretation I gave of his work was no longer his work.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: When Joseph Beuys was asked why he hated the term 'conceptual art', he said, 'Because a concept, an idea, is a starting point, not a final form.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: Not having to execute ideas into a physical and therefore flawed final form was the whole point of conceptual art, no?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: I think I would consider that series of twelve 10" my vinyl debut, but maybe because it was twelve different records or in 10" format it doesn't really count?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Analogue electronic computers pre-date their digital counterparts by several decades, and one of the first practical applications of the analogue computer was in controlling the trajectories of German V2 rockets as they traced their rainbow of gravity from Flanders towards London during the Second World War.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


They approach DE PLAYER for some input surrounding the production and distribution of it, and because of the direct relation between sound and image, and the new interface an object like that represents, it was a clear match of interests.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


We eventually asked Derek Holzer because of his work with tonewheels, but it was not logistically possible to facilitate this type of performance.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Julia Bünnagel was also invited, under the guise of contributing a more physical input.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In 1989 the 'Broken Music' exhibition was held in Berlin at DAAD gallery with work by, among others, Nam June Paik, John Cage, Milan Knížák and Christian Marclay.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The outcomes ranged from installations to be played by the public to plastic works in which the plate was transformed, mutated.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The usual code of the record, as defined by the music industry, was broken in all works.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


For this year's festival, it was clear to us that we should present the 'Pushing Scores' project.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


Piet Zwart Institute > TGC#3, Seminar + Live Event: Together with the team of the Experimental Publishing course at the Piet Zwart Institute, a seminar was organised for the students over a period of three months during which the principles of 'Pushing Scores' took the lead.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


A publication was taken as a joint focal point, the form of which could be determined in more detail.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


However, it was decided to start from the floppy disc as a medium.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Valentina Vuksic was involved in the ARTKILLART x JUBILEE event in 2017.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


It was a good concert and her way of working fit into our ideas of exploring graphic scores very well.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


Her score was made on the spot with programming language; a sort of live coding.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


Later the seventh tone 'si' was added.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


The well-known 'Do-Re-Mi' and the solfège, a teaching method in music for learning pitch and the singing of sheet music, was developed from this.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


The invitation was perfectly suited for a project in public space that he had in mind for 'Pushing Scores'.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


The idea was to create a choir with mobile phones for the audience waiting to get inside the Dutch pop temple of Paradiso.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


The work was installed for a period at The Small Museum – a cabinet on the facade of Paradiso, Amsterdam.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


A seventh note, 'si' or 'ti', was added later.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


The Small Museum, which was previously used to house the public announcements of the church, will be transformed into a local WiFi hotspot to stream a multi vocal 'Pa-Ra-Di-So Rapsodia' – a live algorithmic choir composition created through the phones that connected to the WiFi, and therefore the score, while waiting to enter the building.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


Before music was established in writing, each choir leader led the Gregorian chants of the 'scola cantorum' with movements.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


As far as melody is concerned, humming was increasingly defined by the expansion of the number of lines, which first corresponded by colour and later by keys to certain steps in the medieval ranges.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


This so-called 'manual notation' was of great importance to ensure the reproducibility of the various rhythmic possibilities in the developing polyphonic music of Western Europe.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


It was particularly of interested to us because of the way in which he focuses on the reproduction of music.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


The third stage deals with the mechanical reproduction of music and the fourth stage could be considered as already referring to the idea of sampling, although it was only first published in translation by the University of Minnesota in 1985.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


Jacques Attali (born 1 Nov 1943) is a French economic and social theorist, writer, political adviser and senior civil servant, who served as a counsellor to President François Mitterrand from 1981 to 1991 and was the first head of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development from 1991 to 1993.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


The entire 'Pushing Scores' project was set up in cooperation with Remco van Bladel.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


For the 2015 edition of the Venice Biennale, the studio was responsible for the design of the publication and identity of 'to be all ways to be', the exhibition by herman de vries for the Dutch Pavilion.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


This was not about hard comparisons and one-to-one projection, but more to interpret, think and work with elements.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


It was an investigation into methodologies within his own artistic practice.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


This analogue way of generating sound from graphic notation was an impulse to check him out for the 'Pushing Scores' project.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


He came up with the idea to give a reading of his text 'Schematics as a Score', because that was a current issue of his practice.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


John Cage once quipped that Serge Tcherepnin's synthesizer system was 'the best musical composition that Serge had ever made', and it is precisely Cage's reformulation of the concert score from a list of deterministic note values to a set of indeterminable possibilities that allowed the blurring of lines between instrument-builder and music composer that followed.
└ from 15 — Schematic as Design


Derek Holzer was invited for the event 'PUSHING' on 20 Jan 2017.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


Analogue electronic computers pre-date their digital counterparts by several decades, and one of the first practical applications of the analogue computer was in controlling the trajectories of German V2 rockets as they traced their rainbow of gravity from Flanders towards London during the Second World War.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


As Friedrich Kittler has observed, the relationship of media technology to military tools of destruction was sealed by moments such as these.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


This gave birth to the realtime-controllable, analogue modular synthesizer, which was subsequently expanded by others such as Bob Moog and Serge Tcherepnin.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


George Brecht (27 Aug 1926–5 Dec 2008), born George Ellis MacDiarmid, was an American conceptual artist and avant-garde composer, as well as a professional chemist who worked as a consultant for companies including Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson and Mobil Oil.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


He was a key member of, and influence on, Fluxus, the international group of avant-garde artists centred on George Maciunas, having been involved with the group from the first performances in Wiesbaden 1962 until Maciunas' death in 1978.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


Steve Joy took me to meet George Brecht in his studio when I was in-residence at St Michael's in Manhattan in 1962.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


This work was performed at St. Vincent College under the direction of Stephen Joy with Roman Verostko assisting in 1963.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


Before music was established in writing, each choir leader led the Gregorian chants of the 'scola cantorum' with movements.
└ from 18 — Dirigeerstok


Some of the festivals that have included Guðmundur’s music are Tectonics Festival (both Reykjavík and Glasgow), MATA, Musikin Aika, Ultima, November Music, Transit, Music for People and Thingamajigs, Nordlichter Biennale, Timisoara International Music Festival and the Irish Sound, Science and Technology Convocation in 2014, where Guðmundur was also keynote speaker.
└ from 22 — Anitation


Before language there was the song.
└ from 23 — Silence


Before the song there was the yodel,' As Bart Plantenga stated in his reading on yodeling.
└ from 23 — Silence


His work/action 'Product Placements', which helped to discuss copyright and the level of creation in music, was widely spread.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Eventually, he was accompanied by numerous journalists with a small truck full of completed applications to the GEMA Directorate General in Berlin.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


The system was therefore completely stuck.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


For this purpose, he was accompanied by numerous press representatives to deliver a small truck's worth of completed applications to the GEMA Directorate General in Berlin.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


We became acquainted with Helga Jakobson's work through Bas van den Hurk, who at the time of introduction was teaching on the postgraduate program that Helga took part in at St Joost.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


Bas encouraged her to contact DE PLAYER as she was occupied with developing a machine that produces sound through the process of reading spider webs.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


We had an appointment and it was immediately clear that this project was of interest to us and we decided to present her prototype at an event in which other inventive ways of sound making were presented.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


The idea of a spider web as a score was also very closely aligned with the 'Pushing Scores' project.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


For example, mining is in the arctic zone, and an asteroid mining law was adopted in Luxembourg in 2017 that gives companies ownership of what they extract from celestial bodies.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The musique concrète, as developed by Henry at GRM, was made by magnetic tape.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Magnetic tape was the medium of BJ Nilsen's youth.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It made him realise how closely he was actually involved in the process of iron ore, and how his development as an artist was shaped thanks to iron ore.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Douglas Kahn is Professor of Media and Innovation at the National Institute of Experimental Arts (NIEA), University of New South Wales, Sydney, and Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Davis, where he was the Founding Director of Technocultural Studies.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


His best known book, 'Noise, Water, Meat: A History of Sound in the Arts', was published by MIT Press in 1999.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


When it was empty, I mapped out the building by recording it.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


I made field recordings in the winter; you hear ice crystals cracking because there was a layer of ice on the snow.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The slambanken is a totally artificial, man-made landscape that has formed because the waste of the iron ore processing was flushed into the fjord.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


We did a study and tried to identify how thick the layer was in different areas.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


This was part of a test production of around 30,000 tons.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The sound of the mine was always present.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


When the mill was in full operation the only time when we woke up in the night was when the train was not going.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


For me it relates directly to iron ore in so far that the type of musique concrète and tape music developed at GRM was made possible by magnetic tape.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


I mixed part of the recording in the GRM studios in Paris where I was working on another acousmatic piece.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Magnetic tape was the medium of my youth.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It made me recognise again how close we are to the source of ore, and how my development as an artist was shaped by iron ore.' 'The iron ore is refined and filtered, making sure the pure magnetite comes out.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Each signal was chosen for the resonance it evokes in the listener, later interwoven with other signals recorded from the same source for several days.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


The UNI was developed by Niek Hilkmann and Joseph Knierzinger, and it is a machine into which a coin is inserted and from which a printed score is then delivered.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


His presentation was a crossover between a lecture and a demonstration.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


Black MIDI was first employed by Shirasagi Yukki at Kuro Yuki Gohan's rendition of 'U.N.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


It was uploaded to the site ‘Nico Nico Douga’ in 2009, and public awareness of black MIDI started to spread from Japan to China and Korea over the following two years.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The black MIDI community in Japan vanished quickly because, according to Jason Nguyen (owner of the channel 'Gingeas'), the group was 'analogous to those TV shows where there’s a mysterious founder of a civilisation that is not really known throughout the course of the show.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The first of these tracks to reach the million-note mark was that of 'Necrofantasia' from the Touhou Project video game 'Perfect Cherry Blossom', arranged by TheTrustedComputer.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


According to California-based blacker TheTrustedComputer, black MIDI was intended as more of a remix style than an actual genre, and derived from the idea of 'bullet hell' shoot 'em up games, which involved 'so many bullets at a time your eyes can't keep up.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


One of these labels was Circle Records, which had been up and running for a few years, headed by John Nixon, Julian Dashper and Marc Fusinato.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


For the release event only John Nixon could be present, as Julian unfortunately died at young age and Marco was primarily active as a visual artist.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


People were guided to the eighth floor and into the directors room, which was darkened with newspapers stacked on the windows.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


A huge public announcement system was in the office blazing loud, but very articulated sound.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


a b o u t t h i s a r c h i v e
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G e n e r a t e s c o r e !