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The notation of sound has a long and varied history, from Gregorian chants conducted following signs written in the air, to the standard notation of the Western music we know today and the possibilities offered by new computer technologies.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Next to this there will also be graphic works by students from the Graphic Design Department of ArtEZ University of the Arts, Arnhem.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


By travelling with TGC#3 we aim to expand its floppy collection and to focus on experimental ways of publishing.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


For the Pinkie Bowtie session we invited Antwerp-based artists to contribute to the project.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


So far Evelin Brosi, AMVK and JODI will show up to get informed about matters of relevance and will then start to produce their floppy work for the collection from there.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


The meeting is open for members of the public who are interested in experimental ways of publishing or who just like to hang out amongst the ambience of artistic ‘nouveauté’.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Sat 14 & Sun 15 Apr 2018 @ Corner of Maashaven Oostzijde and Brieselaan (next to Metrostation Maashaven), Rotterdam DE PLAYER PRESENTS 'GREATEST HITS' A solo exhibition by Matthieu Reijnoudt, curated by Willem de Haan 'Greatest Hits' is an exhibition based on twenty-five hand-drawn scores by Matthieu Reijnoudt.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


This project, which focuses on what we have come to refer to as the ‘graphic score’, has been running over the last two to three years.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Graphic scores and notation have a long history dating back to the tenth century, when the Gregorian chants of the 'scola cantorum' were already being conducted through the writing of signs in the air.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


In the early- to mid-twentieth century, the abstract developments in the visual arts played a vital role in fostering new approaches to the question of music notation and contemporary avant-garde music.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


This continues to question the representation of sound in media to this day.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Pushing Scores' is a project researching graphic notation, based on a desire to update this form of music and sound notation for the twenty-first century.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Starting from the motto ‘From Cage to JODI and beyond’, and from the avant-garde music and sound art of the twentieth century, the project researches new audio-visual languages, media and functions of graphic notation in a contemporary context characterised by a fundamental transformation of sound culture and visual culture.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


In an attempt to redefine this concept, we will be compiling a programme in which artists, musicians, theoreticians and practitioners are invited to participate.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


The collective goal is to develop and present new audio-visual and media-technical forms of graphic notation through artistic research and development.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Based on our compilation of the most contemporary and innovative graphic notation practices in the fields of music, sound art, performance art, e-culture, new-media art, graphic design and media design, we will introduce artists and designers from various creative disciplines to a national and international audience, with the goal of collectively developing new forms of graphic notation.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Our ambition, and that of our collaborating partners, is to emancipate graphic notation from the confines of the modernist tradition, in such a way that it may remain an innovative and provocative medium for decades to come.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Some dare to say that it’s a kind of jukebox.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


Encased within a concrete body, an internal stand-alone WiFi station enables you to get in touch with the content of this floppy magazine.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


DE PLAYER was asked by the XPUB programme of Piet Zwart Institute to do a seminar during a three-month period with their students.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


We proposed to the students that they devise an issue of our publication Tetra Gamma Circulaire.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


This is a magazine without any format, with the intention for a new one to be developed each time.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


Each student had to develop their own project around the process of making a score.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


All these scores then had to come together in one magazine/object.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


One restriction was decided upon: The scores had to be presented on floppy disc.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


This was put in place to both limit possibilities and to unite the format.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


‘Fred Flintstone meets the twenty-first century’, it was referred to as.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


During the performance, which lasted for several hours, visitors could freely join, listen and pose questions to the artist, Remörk (a.k.a.
└ from 03 — Principium 2.0 Presentation


The notation of sound has a long and varied history, from Gregorian chants conducted following signs written in the air, to the standard notation of the Western music we know today and the possibilities offered by new computer technologies.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Next to this there will also be graphic works by students from the Graphic Design Department of ArtEZ University of the Arts, Arnhem.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


It’s not a matter of an event between spectators and a musician– it’s a space to submit to a process.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


We were discussing several projects and possibilities for collaboration with Defne Ayas and Samuel Saelemakers of Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art when they asked us to participate in Charlemagne Palestine's exhibition 'GesammttkkunnsttMeshuggahhLaandtttt' by organising a live event.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Nevertheless, he showed me some books he once made in New York, which he said were to be seen as musical scores.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


The ink was absorbed by the books and, after drying, it turned out to be a series of morphing colours that shifted with each page turn.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Yann Gourdon was asked to do a hurry-curdy noisette while Charlemagne's books were projected page by page on the wall.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Floris Vanhoof played a set during which he used his brainwaves to influence his synthesizer sounds, combining this with a projection and a laserbeam.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


We have known Vaast Colson to be an interesting artist for quite some time already.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


We had previously worked with Kris Delacourt on 'Principium 2.0', which is a reinterpretation of Colson’s work 'Principium', and so it was a natural progression that we then asked Colson to work on a sound publication with us.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


This print run is to be seen as a performative action.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


It is a complex work that nevertheless manages to remain simple and accessible in its final execution.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Colson belongs to a younger generation of Antwerp artists who could be referred to as 'post-ironic'.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Colson's works examine core questions: What power does art have to change us and our society?
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


From a spontaneous and rather naive approach to art and performance, Colson wants to shape his ideas.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


He opens up the artistic field to explore what is happening in the art world.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


His works, which are regularly made in situ, are often difficult to sell.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


The magnets for the sensor ride on top of the record player's platter and could be placed freely to make your own patterns.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Vaast Colson asked Remörk to reinterpret his work 'Principium', which was a joyful (but strictly ruled) play with sticky coloured dots.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Principium 1.0' appeared as a hacked synth reduced to a single octave, to be played with magnets on a colourful playing field, parallelling the same patterns.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


We showed this piece by Remörk at ART Rotterdam and then I asked Kris if he was willing to make a publication of it, meaning a record.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


He was intrigued by the invitation, but it took a long time to develop.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Nevertheless, we finally fine-tuned concepts and decided not produce recordings but to embed the concept of 'Principium' into a two-in-one record and a music tool.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The funny thing is that after the presentation at Stadslimiet, the recordings of this eight-hour performance were edited back to a 12" vinyl record, which was released by the label Ultra Eczema shortly after.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Colson used tiny paper sticker dots, the kind that most art galleries use to denote which works in a show have been sold.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Colson then asked some artist to make reinterpretations of the works and from here the idea to use them as a music score originated.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Interestingly, he thought his resulting collages would be nice to use as scores – and they probably would have been.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


to him.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And so, he went on to design 'Principium 1.0'; a magnetic board with the same field as the sticker sheets, which he activated with magnets as a synthesizer.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


He reduced the number of keys to twelve, and added a magnetic sequencer board to it.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The idea was to put white magnets atop of the coloured dots as a way to blank them out.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The sequencer controller is a reed switch matrix that, when a magnet is present, allows step pulses to pass to digital switches that bridge the original Casio keys.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


As Delacourt didn't just want to publish a record with recordings of the 'Principium 1.0', he decided to transpose the idea onto a prepared record player using magnets and a specific device.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: I've been following the 'Principium' story on your blog, which dates back to the summer of 2012, so four years ago.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


He made these beautiful pieces where he used tiny paper sticker dots, you know the ones that most art galleries use to denote which works in a show have been sold?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's all pretty nonsensical in a way I guess, especially if you try to put something like that into words, but it’s also really beautiful, and quite fragile.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It just rang as very poetic to me.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And at a certain point he posed something like: 'I've made some work that might be interesting to use as a score, would you be up for it?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The funny thing was that he thought his resulting collages would be nice to use as scores – and they probably would be – but it's just that I was so intrigued by the leftover sticker sheets, with their eight by twelve grid that just screamed 'SEQUENCER!
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I reduced the number of keys to twelve, and added a magnetic sequencer board to it.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The idea was to put white magnets on top of the coloured dots to blank them out, so you end up with something analogous to taking a sticker off the sheet – a white space in a field of colour.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I don't know if I need to go into too much technical detail, but the sequencer controller is just a reed switch matrix that, when a magnet is present, allow step pulses to pass to digital switches that bridge the original Casio keys.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It looks like a game of Four In A Row, totally appealing to get your hands on it.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And I never gave it that much thought, but the fact that when you stick magnets somewhere it makes a musical phrase, well, I guess to some people that would be wizardry, hah.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The next step was when Peter Fengler of DEPLAYER/DOB Records said he wanted to do a record with the Casio version.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But there were several reasons for me to hold back a little on the idea.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's meant to be in a continued state of flux.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The idea of just me making a record totally ignores that, and to me it turns it into something really static and rigid.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


For example, there's this box set which has records that have built-in radio transmitters, records with impossible shapes where you need to turn the stylus of your record player upside down.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And I don't know, maybe part of me wanted to be a part of that history, more than just doing a 'recording'.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Meanwhile, I had been toying around with leftover magnets and magnetic sensors, sticking magnets to a metal turntable platter and using the sensors to switch audio on and off, sort of like a programmable tremolo.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


So we put two and two together, and ended up doing twelve 10" lathe cuts (which came in a box with those electronic switches), with eight magnets each as based on the original grid and a 12" metal platter to sit under the 10" for the magnets to stick to.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And because I couldn’t make up my mind about what sounds to record from the Casio, I ended up not recording the Casio at all.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I decided to stop worrying, which after two years of doubting might not be such a bad thing, and did a ten-minute improvised recording on organ and MS20, playing only C notes.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


If we just used test tones, so to speak, you end up with something close to Morse code.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And I don't mind a good concept now and then, but I guess I'm too much of a musician, so I went for what was more appealing to me musically.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I guess I do tend to overthink things, hah.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And an honourable mention to Koos of DOB who did an amazing job designing the packaging.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Basically, the program decided for me which records to play, whether to repeat them or not when they were finished, whether to leave the turntable empty, whether the electronics should punch holes in the sound when a magnet was detected or the opposite, how may magnets on each turntable and the playback volume.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The only thing I had any control over was where to put the magnets, which determines the rhythm.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Funny thing was that we’d agreed to let it run until 23:00, and at about two minutes to then I got the first ever instruction to leave all the turntables empty.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


After that, Dennis asked me if I wanted to do a release of the recordings.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I think initially he wanted to do a tape.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


So I went through eight hours of recordings, selecting bits that I liked and that I thought would be interesting enough to listen to as pieces in their own right, and not just as part of this monster performance.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I think the idea to make a vinyl record came after Dennis heard some of the selections and thought they shouldn’t be out on tape but on vinyl instead.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I can still see unexplored possibilities there – as an installation, or as a truly playable musical instrument, and even those two do not have to be mutually exclusive.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Was one of your fears that, by making it into a 12", you would have to bring this project to a final version?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Also because I really am convinced that this is just one more step towards something that can keep going, that it doesn't have to be final.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I guess my main fear was that by cutting chunks out of a much larger whole, you risk losing the context – and I'm still not sure what this record sounds like to people that weren't there.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I know it's not a final version, but it is a version nonetheless, and I want all versions to be of a certain quality.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I thought it worked really well as a performance, but I wanted to make sure it was good enough to be a record.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: Bringing an eight-hour performance back to an album format seems like a hell of a job.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


That's quite brutal to listen to in concentration, to be honest.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It took me about two months to sit through all eight hours, and put markers and comments with bits I liked more than others.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Of course, because the basic tempo is the same, it would have been relatively easy to start editing, splicing things together.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But to be honest I've never even considered that – eight hours of material and endless editing possibilities, that's a nightmare.., The decision to have straight up documentation, just select bits instead of editing them some more, really made the selection process easier.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


If something was interesting for a while, but didn't stay interesting, it had to go.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: Do you think that, by bringing it back to an LP, you're making it easier for the listener?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Were there people who actually listened to the whole eight-hour performance?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Do you think that listening to an eight-hour performance demands another kind of concentration from the listener than listening to an LP?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But I'm not sure if it is at all possible to listen with concentration to eight hours of something like this.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: I guess there was the point where I decided to just do a ten-minute organ improvisation, that was a bit of a turning point.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But I really needed a break from thinking it over and to just do something... Plus, it adds a much needed layer of spontaneity that works beautifully, not in the least musically, so no regrets.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I like working with concepts a lot, as a starting point, but I'm also interested enough in the results to loosen up the concept if I feel it's needed.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But they do form one big piece, and as far as final forms go, I guess you could consider the performance to be the final form of that particular piece.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


That's also purely pragmatic: Now they've all been sold, it's going to be very difficult to get all twelve of them together again for a second performance.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But it's still a relevant idea to me, this kind of creative misuse.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Now, I never would have though it up if it weren't for Vaast's initial invitation, or for Peter asking me to do a record, or Dennis wanting to present it in Antwerp.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But Vaast, for instance, refuses to regard it as his doing.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Then Peter and Koos asked me to do a record because they run a record label and they want to release stuff they think is interesting.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


That's awesome, and I'm flattered to be a part of that, but in a way it's also what record labels are supposed to be doing, no?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And the same goes for this record on Ultra Eczema: I have to say I'm really happy we finally got an Ultra Eczema release together, it's something Dennis had been asking for for quite some time... He’d actually given up asking.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But now with this thing it just seemed to fall into place perfectly.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


If you stick to the concept, you miss out on the creative aspect, which should be the most important part.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Does this sound recognisable to you?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And how would you relate this quote to your LP?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: Not having to execute ideas into a physical and therefore flawed final form was the whole point of conceptual art, no?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The notion that an idea can be just as valid and just as creative as its execution.., But anyway, I am always glad if I manage to turn an idea into a physical form.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Did I mention I tend to overthink things?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But then, I don’t fully agree that you miss out on creativity by sticking to a concept.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And sometimes, by sticking to it, you end up with the most unexpected results – adhering to rules you impose on yourself makes you do stuff you would never have decided for yourself.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It can make you go against your natural inclinations, which does not always have to be a bad thing.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: The Ultra Eczema site refers to this record as your debut LP.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's a document of what I'm happy to be working on at the moment, and hopefully it's something that others can enjoy as well.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: If you force me to choose between those two, then drone.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I tend to associate collage records with cut and paste editing, jumpcuts, going from one atmosphere to the next in no time.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The only things remotely close to jumpcuts that are on this record were due to the electronics of the installation, the sensors turning the sound on and off.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: Do you think this LP would also be enjoyable if someone would listen to it without knowing a single thing about the whole concept behind it?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But I did try to select bits that I thought had a beauty or a strong appeal to them, an interesting evolution or whatever, so much so that I hope they can survive as musical pieces in their own right.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


In an attempt to redefine this concept, we will be compiling a programme in which artists, musicians, theoreticians and practitioners are invited to participate.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The collective goal is to develop and present new audiovisual and media-technical forms of graphic notation through artistic research and development.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Based on our compilation of the most contemporary and innovative graphic notation practices in the fields of music, sound art, performance art, e-culture, new-media art, graphic design and media design, we will introduce artists and designers from various creative disciplines to a national and international audience, with the goal of collectively developing new forms of graphic notation.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Incorporated into the structure of the book are sensors and electronics, providing each page with its own unique soundtrack, which can be listened to via speakers or headphones.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The software they write enables them to compose ever-evolving audiovisual worlds.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Incorporated into the structure of the book are sensors and electronics, providing each page with its own unique soundtrack, which can be listened to via speakers or headphones.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The software they write enables them to compose ever-evolving audiovisual worlds.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


I turned and turned the pages, each time trying to think about the possible connections between the colours and patterns printed on the pages and the sound they emitted.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Julia's solo live performances primarily refer to the modified vinyl records that produce extraordinary sounds.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


To complete the event we searched for two completely different approaches to composition.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


We eventually asked Derek Holzer because of his work with tonewheels, but it was not logistically possible to facilitate this type of performance.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Instead, he came over to do a reading from his text 'Schematic as a Score' and did a live set of Tektronix Oscilloscope Music.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In contrast to the composer or musician who perceives the record first and foremost as a vehicle transporting his or her musical ideas, here the interest lies especially in the optical/sculptural, as well as the acoustic presence and the compression of an idea when working with the playback possibilities and impossibilities of recording techniques.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In his article 'New Plasticism in Music: Possibilities of the Gramophone', László Moholy-Nagy said that it lies in the peculiarity of human nature that: The abuse and misunderstanding [of the record form] are necessary to gain results.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


After every new recording the functioning apparatus is pushed ahead to further new impressions.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


That is one of the reasons for the necessity to always continue experiments in New Plasticism.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


As production, meaning here productive creation, above all serves the human condition, we must attempt to further our purposes of creative production through the uses of those apparatuses or methods which until now have been used only for reproduction purposes.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The outcomes ranged from installations to be played by the public to plastic works in which the plate was transformed, mutated.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Pushing Scores 20 Jan 2019 @ ART Rotterdam, Rotterdam with Moniker, Rafaël Rozendaal, Luuk Bouwman, Telcosystems, Remco van Bladel For ART Rotterdam 2017 we are pleased to present Experimental Jetset, Davide Mosconi, DUPAC, Moniker, Cold Void [Rafaël Rozendaal/Luuk Bouwman] and Telcosystems.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


It has been beneficial for us because the format allowed us to reach an audience that would otherwise never come to DE PLAYER itself.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


For this year's festival, it was clear to us that we should present the 'Pushing Scores' project.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


We decided to envision the framework for the installation as a three-dimensional staff to write down music.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


Within this framework we presented newly produced works, made specifically for 'Pushing Scores', alongside existing works that we thought would be interesting to combine.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


By doing so, we developed a multidimensional approach to the tactics that can be used for making scores and how the outcomes could finally exist as a tradable object.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


People could continuously listen to some audio publications (by Telcosystems, Cold Void and Davide Mosconi) as well take part in the production process by spraying new works for the next potential customer.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


HIELE MARTENS (BE) Sometimes 1 + 1 is greater than the sum of its parts, but if you put two of Belgium's finest composers and musicians together, it adds up to an infinite number.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Hiele Martens' debut record is about to be released on Ultra Eczema and is expected to become one of the highlights of this year.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


HELGA JAKOBSON (CA) Whether culminating in actions or objects, Helga Jakobson's work responds to conditions of limbo within existence and acts as a platform to confront the unknown, focusing on death, time and ephemerality.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The concept of the course revolves around two core principles: First, the inquiry into the technological, political and cultural processes through which things are made public; and second, the desire to expand the notion of publishing beyond print media and its direct digital translation.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The XPUB students who contributed to the development of TGC#3 are: Karina Dukalska, Max Franklin, Giulia de Giovanelli, Clàudia Giralt, Francisco González, Margreet Riphagen, Nadine Rotem-Stibbe and Kimmy Spreeuwenberg.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


However, it was decided to start from the floppy disc as a medium.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The idea of a score functioned as a guideline to shape their project and to test the working process.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The local WiFi station makes it possible to access all projects (on floppy disk) by receiving these projects via a mobile phone or on the computer.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The audience has the opportunity to control the dancers' steps on stage through a web interface that shows her personal approach to graphically representing ten jive steps.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


For TGC#3 he developed a tool that is a learning counterpart to his own musical input.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


ARCHIVING 'PUSHING SCORES' WITH VALENTINA VUKSIC, ANA GUEDES, VARIA AND NIEK HILKMANN Thu 29 Nov 2018 20:00 @ Varia, Rotterdam During this evening we will focus on archiving our 'Pushing Scores' project, a project interrogating the meaning of the 'graphic score' that has been running for the last two to three years.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


To communicate the project to a larger audience, DE PLAYER asked Varia to develop a context and technical environment as a web-based archival publication for the 'Pushing Scores' project.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


Varia will host the evening, and explain their ideas and approach to developing the archive.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


The 'runtime' of executed software is staged for an audience to provide an acoustic experience: That of logic encountering the physical world.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


She played a set in which she used her computer to generate sound by live programming.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


In reaction to the dematerialisation of music (the general disappearance of music released in its physical form), the artists of the ARTKILLART label roster refocus their releases as material objects.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


She aims for a sensual experience of the analytical sphere to become concrete, where logic encounters the physical world.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


The mechanic noises serve as mediators to a public.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


A mobile website that connects you to the hardware inside the cabinet and turns your phone into a local speaker for a polyphonic voice piece.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


An algorithmic choir is compiled live by the mobile phones that connect to the WiFi point while audiences are waiting in line to enter Paradiso.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


Paradiso invited Remco van Bladel to take part in their Small Museum project.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


The idea was to create a choir with mobile phones for the audience waiting to get inside the Dutch pop temple of Paradiso.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


This scale is the basis for 'Do-Re-Mi' and solfège, a music education method used to teach the singing of Western music.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


The Small Museum, which was previously used to house the public announcements of the church, will be transformed into a local WiFi hotspot to stream a multi vocal 'Pa-Ra-Di-So Rapsodia' – a live algorithmic choir composition created through the phones that connected to the WiFi, and therefore the score, while waiting to enter the building.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


Later, the neumens – depending on the relative pitch differences – were noted above, on or below a line referring to a pitch determined by the choral conductor.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


As far as melody is concerned, humming was increasingly defined by the expansion of the number of lines, which first corresponded by colour and later by keys to certain steps in the medieval ranges.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


In the middle of the thirteenth century, Peter de Cruce came to a notation in which the relative duration of each note is indicated by the form of the note.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


This so-called 'manual notation' was of great importance to ensure the reproducibility of the various rhythmic possibilities in the developing polyphonic music of Western Europe.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


It was particularly of interested to us because of the way in which he focuses on the reproduction of music.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


The second phase is important to the perspective of sound reproduction, graphic score and the tangibility of sound and/or the object.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


It refers to the era of printed music (1500–1900).
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


During this period, the musical score is tied to a physical carrier for the first time, and thus becomes a commodity for sale in the market.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


This represents the music in the absence of the maker, and in the presence of an audience an effort must be made to read and articulate the intensity of the composer of the magazine.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


With the rise of the various avant-garde movements from the beginning of the twentieth century, in addition to new forms of 'sound', the relationship between sound and its visual representation is also being re-examined here.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


The third stage deals with the mechanical reproduction of music and the fourth stage could be considered as already referring to the idea of sampling, although it was only first published in translation by the University of Minnesota in 1985.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


Jacques Attali (born 1 Nov 1943) is a French economic and social theorist, writer, political adviser and senior civil servant, who served as a counsellor to President François Mitterrand from 1981 to 1991 and was the first head of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development from 1991 to 1993.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


Attali is the first to point out other possible logical consequences of the 'reciprocal interaction' model – namely, the possibility of a superstructure to anticipate historical developments and to foreshadow new social formations in a prophetic and annunciatory way.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


We knew that Remco had written an essay called 'Musical Theories in Graphic Design' – on the subject of graphic notation within a broader field of theory formation in contemporary music – and felt it would be a good match to work together on a research project about the graphic score.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


For the 2015 edition of the Venice Biennale, the studio was responsible for the design of the publication and identity of 'to be all ways to be', the exhibition by herman de vries for the Dutch Pavilion.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


The relation between the sound on the records and the visuals on the sleeves and packaging has a strong influence on his current practice, especially in relation to the strategy and concepts he creates for graphic design.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


In it he transposed compositional methodologies of the avant-gardists in the twentieth century to graphic design methodologies, for instance, by understanding Steve Reich's phase shifting technique through the lens of design.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


He also engaged with work from Stockhausen and Cage, working comparatively to assess differences and find similarities.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


This was not about hard comparisons and one-to-one projection, but more to interpret, think and work with elements.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


His artistic practice is formed by a number of ingredients that have always been present in his work to a greater or lesser extent.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


Both as a source or inspiration, as a metaphor, as a thinking model and as an 'attitude' in relation to his practice.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


Sound in relation to image remains an elusive phenomenon that continues to fascinate him because sound/music is the most abstract art form.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


The subjective nature, the way in which vibrations can release such strong emotions, makes it possible to deal speculatively and to use them for use in typography, image, material choices, folding methods and bookbinding systems.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


We became familiar with the work of Derek Holzer through his project on tonewheels – an experiment in converting graphical imagery to sound, inspired by some of the pioneering twentieth century electronic music inventions.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


Transparent tonewheels with repeating patterns are spun over light-sensitive electronic circuitry to produce sound and light pulsations and textures.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


This analogue way of generating sound from graphic notation was an impulse to check him out for the 'Pushing Scores' project.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


He came up with the idea to give a reading of his text 'Schematics as a Score', because that was a current issue of his practice.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


It completely complimented our thinking around how to imagine the concept of composing and making scores.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


Many artists try to eliminate true, catastrophic failures by scripting, scoring, sequencing or programming their work in as many predictable, risk-free quantums as possible in advance.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


Over the past few years there has been a strong response to the sterile world of sound and video from the laptop.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


This has led to a new interest in analogue processes or 'dirty hands' art.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


Over the past few years there has been a strong response to the sterile world of sound and video from the laptop.
└ from 15 — Schematic as Design


This has led to a new interest in analogue processes or 'dirty hands' art.
└ from 15 — Schematic as Design


John Cage once quipped that Serge Tcherepnin's synthesizer system was 'the best musical composition that Serge had ever made', and it is precisely Cage's reformulation of the concert score from a list of deterministic note values to a set of indeterminable possibilities that allowed the blurring of lines between instrument-builder and music composer that followed.
└ from 15 — Schematic as Design


VECTOR SYNTHESIS' WORKSHOP WITH DEREK HOLZER AT PIKSEL 9–11 Mar 2018 @ Piksel Studio 207, Bergen 'VECTOR SYNTHESIS' is an audiovisual, computational art project using sound synthesis and vector graphics display techniques to investigate the direct relationship between sound and image.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


The Vector Synthesis library allows the creation and manipulation of 2D and 3D vector shapes, Lissajous figures and scan-processed image and video inputs using audio signals sent directly to oscilloscopes, hacked CRT monitors, Vectrex game consoles, ILDA laser displays or oscilloscope emulation softwares using the Pure Data programming environment.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


During this workshop, the attendants learnt how to use a custom library in the Pure Data programming environment to directly control the vertical and horizontal movements, as well as the brightness, of a beam of light.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


As Friedrich Kittler has observed, the relationship of media technology to military tools of destruction was sealed by moments such as these.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


In the early 1960s, the composer Morton Subotnik employed engineer Don Buchla to help him create 'the music of the future'.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


Buchla redesigned the existing function generators of analogue computers to respond to voltage controls of their frequency and amplitude.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


This gave birth to the realtime-controllable, analogue modular synthesizer, which was subsequently expanded by others such as Bob Moog and Serge Tcherepnin.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


And by the early 1970s, an interest in cybernetics, systems theory and automatic processes brought the analog computer closer to the worlds of art, music and architecture.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


The 1972 Rutt-Etra Video Synthesizer, used famously by the Vasuka's in several works, employed an analogue computer to manipulate and deconstruct the raster of a conventional video signal with very otherworldly effects.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


Vector graphics were widely adopted by video game manufacturers in the late 1970s due to their computational efficiency, and the wealth of experience using them that the history of analogue computing provided.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


As electronics became cheaper, smaller and faster in the 1980s, the dated technology of using analogue vectors to directly manipulate a Cathode Ray Tube fell out of favor and rasterised graphics and animations, and moving image quickly took their place.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


remain largely unchanged since the dawn of the Vectorian Era indicates to me that seeking to satisfy them with technology alone is quite problematic.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


One of the originators of 'participatory art', in which the artwork can only be experienced by the active involvement of the viewer, he is most famous for his 'Event Scores', such as 'Drip Music' (1962), and is widely seen as an important precursor to conceptual art.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


Steve Joy took me to meet George Brecht in his studio when I was in-residence at St Michael's in Manhattan in 1962.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


We became friends and he mailed instruction cards to me.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


I brought Steve Joy to St. Vincent College when I returned to the monastery from Paris in 1963.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


George Brecht agreed to provide instructions for an event at St. Vincent.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


For his 'Vehicle Sundown Event', he published a set of about fifty cards to be given to participants who participated in the event with their vehicles.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


Each card held an instruction to be performed with a vehicle.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


Drivers were instructed to assemble at sundown in a parking lot and randomly park their vehicles.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


A baton is a stick that is used by conductors primarily to enlarge and enhance the manual and bodily movements associated with directing an ensemble of musicians.
└ from 18 — Dirigeerstok


This object is chosen to be part of the archive because it is the first and most simple tool to translate a written score to the musician who has to execute it.
└ from 18 — Dirigeerstok


Later, the neumens – depending on the relative pitch differences – were noted above, on or below a line referring to a pitch determined by the choral conductor.
└ from 18 — Dirigeerstok


Jörg Piringer has contributed to Each One, a 10" vinyl dubplate, each one with original sound and related artwork, edition of forty pieces.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


The way in which he arrives at his poetry is very closely linked to his knowledge and skills of the programming language.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


Image and sound are created immediately during the performance by speaking and vocalising into a microphone and modifying the voice through signal processors and samplers while the software is analysing the sound to create animated abstract visual text-compositions.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


Piringer is also involved in Huellkurven – an online sound poetry magazine and a series of events dedicated to sound poetry, poésie sonore, lautpoesie, noise poetry, sound-text composition, auditive poetry and audio poetry, among other things.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


For 'Pushing Scores', we invited him to make special work for a limited edition.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


The packaging of each record is also linked to the unique file and consists of an original visual work that is derived from or transformed via a formula from the programming language that underlies the audio poems present on the record.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


DE PLAYER is interested in sound that fraternies in the abstract sense and makes people communicate with each other, without having to understand each other specifically in terms of language.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


Music and dance are complimentary to the context of being together without literally understanding each other word for word.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


In addition to the all-dominating impact of the music industry, which determines lifestyle at the level of confection, all sorts of de-mass-splintering genres are forming on the periphery of the musical firmament.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


Orientation with regard to giving meaning changes by inserting moments when improper use of thought, material and technology takes place.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


Multilingualism is important in giving meaning to the things around us.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


Publishing, as mentioned above, is important to communicate various ways of expression.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


Within 'Radical Listening' we want to see what the possibilities of communication and publishing are with the current means that are available to us.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


We investigate how contemporary means are used to shape language, sign and sound.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


They are a group that plays music in an 'extra-musical' or 'non-musical' sort of rhythm (so to speak).
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


Through his compositions he has developed a rhythmic language devoid of regular beat or metre, and he has created a new musical notation to represent his music.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


This approach has led to the development of his animated notation, or 'anitation', instead of using traditional musical scores.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


As he explains, 'By intently focusing on small differences, both in rhythm and pitch, the ear gets tuned to a microscopic mode of listening.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


They had been performing before we started the 'Pushing Scores' project, yet we nevertheless claim their work to be part of it.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


As he explains, 'By intently focusing on small differences, both in rhythm and pitch, the ear gets tuned to a microscopic mode of listening.
└ from 22 — Anitation


He also used to be a co-curator of the Jaðarber concert series and Fengjastrútur Ensemble.
└ from 22 — Anitation


The reader will see inscriptions that oscillate between pictures and writing, and between visual and auditory, exemplifying those capacities of drawing to operate in the spaces between languages.
└ from 23 — Silence


In the context of an experimental music notation, seeking to make an instrumental gesture of silence, how can we draw incipience?
└ from 23 — Silence


Before God needed to be invented there were man.
└ from 23 — Silence


Johannes Kreidler is a special case when it comes to composing.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


He approaches the themes he uses (including authorship) through various entities directly linked to society.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


A few examples appeal to the imagination with regard to how a score can be understood and which elements and/or processes can play a role in this.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


From 2000 to 2006 Kreidler studied composition with Mathias Spahlinger, electronic music with Orm Finnendahl and Mesias Maiguashca and music theory with Eckehard Kiem at the University of Music Freiburg and at the Institute of Sonology (Computer Music) of the Koninklijk Conservatorium, the Hague.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


His work/action 'Product Placements', which helped to discuss copyright and the level of creation in music, was widely spread.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In a thirty-three second piece, he processed 70,200 quotations of foreign works, all of which he submitted individually via forms to the German Buma Stemra (GEMA).
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Eventually, he was accompanied by numerous journalists with a small truck full of completed applications to the GEMA Directorate General in Berlin.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


The minimal samples used (only milliseconds of time) are intended to test the credibility and effectiveness of the GEMA in relation to the digital reality.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


If such a fraction can still be labelled as music, it can still be linked to the original and the performing artist in terms of financial compensation for use.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


This is close to his work ‘Charts Music’, in which he used the share prices of various companies to derive pitches.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In this piece, too, reference is made to the borderline areas of copyright, and credits composers and copyright holders mentioned by the respective companies instead of Kreidler himself.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


For another work he commissioned composers from low-wage countries to plagiarise his own music for a commission for the Festival Klangwerkstatt in Berlin.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


According to Kreidler, the action, entitled 'Fremdarbeit', is intended to focus attention on the themes of exploitation and authorship.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


We asked Johannes to do a reading about his practice as a composer during the event we organised around music and capitalism.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


This piece is to be seen as a plunder phonic composition in extremis.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In September 2008 a piece of press advertised his action ‘Product Placements’, with which he wanted to initiate a discussion on copyright and the height of creation in music.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In a thirty-three second piece of music, he processed 70,200 quotes of foreign works, proceeding to individually enrolled each one at the GEMA.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


For this purpose, he was accompanied by numerous press representatives to deliver a small truck's worth of completed applications to the GEMA Directorate General in Berlin.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


The plant is deliberately located in a legal gray area, which has been greatly enlarged by digital technologies, so that it is impossible to clarify the case so far.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Within this framework, she investigates the working of memory with the intention to recreate situations, thus evoking a 'presence'.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


Through subjective interpretations of the ability to instrumentalise objects, she creates catalysts for thinking and contemplation.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


An ensemble of Arduino-powered prepared record players is built as an instrumentation to play an intimate selection from a family archive of popular music, 'A set of records carefully shipped home from a country at war forty years ago.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


The vinyls were purchased in Angola, Portugal and Canada from the 60s to the early 80s and have travelled over three continents.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


Ana Guedes' project 'UNTITLED RECORDS' fits into our idea of finding new ways to compose very seamlessly.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


Because she uses and records the archive, the end result almost turns out to be a DJ set.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


This 'other way' to come to sound is an interesting phenomenon.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


Also the way in which she approaches the technical implementation of possibilities to program the record players is interesting, especially regarding, for example, the idea of 'schematics as a score'.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


Her research often leads her to short-lived and organic material with which she develops new systems and methods for engagement.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


This takes shape by building digital interfaces; instrumentation used to explore, amplify and reflect what is barely visible, tangible or audible, while expressing the resonance and relationship between people, plants and organic matter.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


She passes on the notation she distils from this to music companies in order to come to performances.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


In Japan there's a focus on the lure of the spider, where it is sometimes likened to a prostitute.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


Using the material bequeathed to Arachne's doomed progeny, I've been weaving a visual and sonic tapestry of my own, using digital technology to form new means of mythologising and disseminating non-verbal experience.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


The recordings I make of the webs are an act of commemoration, and as Myers and Husk propose, 'This requires reading with our sense attuned to stories told in otherwise muted registers.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


These spiders have laid out scores in the form of webs that are barely visible ephemera drifting between branches or street signs or windows and I long to understand them.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


To find them I searched through basements, and bars, and zoos, and homes, and parks; though I found the majority of them in a greenhouse where I teetered over cacti and lavender bushes to collect them.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


The process of finding them could be likened to trying to make the invisible visible.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


Bas encouraged her to contact DE PLAYER as she was occupied with developing a machine that produces sound through the process of reading spider webs.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


We had an appointment and it was immediately clear that this project was of interest to us and we decided to present her prototype at an event in which other inventive ways of sound making were presented.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


ORE by BJ Nilsen This work by BJ Nilsen can be seen as an observing documentary and is related to time-lapse filmmaking.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


As a sound artist he realised how much sound there is in the mining industry and began to think in sonic terms about its impact and meaning.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Thus, different layers of time are presented, from slowly unfolding sounds that represent a deep geological time, to sounds of transport, to the kind of sounds that we recognise as science fiction to indicate the future.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In this way, the work creates a third space that belongs to the individual listener and that arises from the interaction between the original space and the imaginary space, created by the composition, the sound processing and the perception of the listener.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


There is a small tribute to Groupe de recherches Musicales (GRM) in Paris and Pierre Henry, which is directly related to iron ore.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It made him realise how closely he was actually involved in the process of iron ore, and how his development as an artist was shaped thanks to iron ore.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Ore 'In ore different layers of time are overlapping, from the deep time of geology to the superfast time of our current economy and the future.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It doesn't relate directly to mining, but it extends the project to include geology, deep time and stone.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


I also went to Näätämö/Neiden and just over the border to Finland because it’s land of the Sámi, and I wanted to have that in.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Throughout the landscape there are sacred stones that are very important to them.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


That's why I wanted to have a thread about the regeneration of mining areas.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


I think it is important to explore the changes that the surrounding landscape and the mining site itself are undergoing, from active to closed, from contaminated landscape to re-vegetation.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


This mining work is tied directly to the computer age, itself an alchemic expression of man's ingenious use of the earth.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Source: http://www.newcriticals.com/deep-mining-deep-time/page-3 Mineral commodities used in mobile devices: Gallium (from bauxite), Germanium (from sphalerite) Graphite Indium (from sphalerite) Lithium (from amblygonite, petalite, lepidolite and spodumene) Platinum Potassium (from langbeinite, sylvite and sylvinite) Rare-earth elements (like bastnäsite, loparite, monazite and xenotime) Sand Silicon (from quartz) Silver (from argentite and tetrahedrite) Tantalum (from columbite and tantalite) Tin (from cassiterite) Tungsten (from scheelite and wolframite) Source: https://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/0167/gip167.pdf Chemical structure of the products of Sydvaranger mine, Kirkenes: Fe – 68% SiO2 – 5.00 Al2O3 – 0.30 S – 0.08 P – 0.01 Mn – 0.05 Na2O – 0.01 K2O – 0.03 CaO – 0.35 MgO – 0.45 H2O – 8.00 Size of the product: Over 0.15mm – less than 0.2% 0.053mm–0.15mm – less than 20% Under 0.053mm – up to 80% Source: http://sydvarangergruve.no/produkt 'In mining there are two types of waste.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


One is the waste you make to get to the ore.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


If you have a gold mine and the gold layer sits fifty metres below surface, you have to remove fifty metres of waste.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The ore goes to a processing plant and there you take out the tailings and the rest is the waste of your process.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It can be a slurry, it may contain chemicals or poisonous materials so you have to contain it and treat and store it properly.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It is important for companies to manage this.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It just turned out that way, perhaps because that's how we generally tend to structure material.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In that way I present different layers of time, from slowly unfolding sounds that represent deep geological time, to sounds of transport, to the sort of sounds we recognise as science fiction to denote the future.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The work creates a third space that belongs to the individual listener and which arises from the interaction between the original space and imaginary space, created through the composition and sound processing… We dig deep into the earth to get to layers of deep time, extract it and use the ancient material, in the case of coal, for electricity, for heating the house, commodities, to type a message on a phone.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It's absurd when you start to think about it.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It’s millions of years compressed into hard materials that are burned up, like coal, or painstakingly refined to yield useful metal.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Pliny the Elder, 'Naturalis Historia, book XXXIII', p. 77, data.perseus.org/citations/urn:cts:latinLit:phi0978.phi001.perseus-eng1:33.1 'If, as Novalis and many of his friends believed, stones, metals and rock strata amount to transcriptions of the earth's history, what better place to study that history than in the mines and caverns of the earth, where the entire record is preserved and exposed?
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


We did a study and tried to identify how thick the layer was in different areas.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


We took samples and ran them through the laboratory in order to identify how many tons of final concentrate we would be able to get out of the slambanken.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It is not enough to make a mine plan, but enough to get a small cash flow.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


You have to take a boat to get there.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


We were living quite close to the railway, so when the train did not run we knew instantaneously that something had happened, either in the mine or in the mill.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


I am drawn to the Arctic as a sound person because of its relative remoteness.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The relentless nature in the Arctic constantly reminds you that you are a human being and that you are not really supposed to be there because the harshness of the environment might kill you.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It's good for the human psyche to be reminded of that.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


These can be an indicator that something is about to happen, the sounds tell something about the stability of the rock.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Geologists read the stone, but they also listen to it.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Geologists use seismic soundings to map out the resources in the earth.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It gives them an image, a bit similar to sonar.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It’s mostly really low sounds that you have to transpose up three times to get within human hearing range.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Through soundwaves geologists are able to map what is underground.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


There is a little homage to GRM and Pierre Schaeffer on the record.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


For me it relates directly to iron ore in so far that the type of musique concrète and tape music developed at GRM was made possible by magnetic tape.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It made me recognise again how close we are to the source of ore, and how my development as an artist was shaped by iron ore.' 'The iron ore is refined and filtered, making sure the pure magnetite comes out.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It is a process that somehow relates to my own artistic process.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


All to get to the desired result: The gold!
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The selection of sounds is done according to properties that lie outside the predictable controllable parameters in order to arrive at a complex multidimensional listening experience.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


His background in performance and his multimedia and confrontational approach gives him full credits to be part of the DE PLAYER programme.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


When we met we had discussions about several professional subjects and decided to realise a publication.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


This approach can also be seen in the Electronic Voice Phenomena (EVP) of Friedrich Jürgenson, a researcher who claimed to have detected voices of the dead hidden in radio static.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


He has a particular interest in the abstruse technological condition we are living in and the insufficient intellectual methodologies that seek to justify, or explain it.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


We already knew some of its members and thought it would be nice and effective to approach them with a question of doing something with the archive of 'Pushing Scores'.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


Instead of making a paintwork publication, we wanted it to be more adventurous and in line with the concept of the project.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


It is based on a new notation system designed to help conceptual composers develop and exchange conceptual music in one uniform language.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


Black MIDI' is a music genre consisting of compositions that use MIDI files to create song remixes containing a large number of notes, typically in the thousands or millions, and sometimes billions.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


DE PLAYER has always had a strong interest in emancipating publishing from its stereotypical understanding as merely making things public – an understanding that comes from an historical and economic media constraint linked to the print, software, music and film industries, and that has limited any form of meaningful, explorative, complementary or conflictual combinations between media in the field of cultural production.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


This is an interesting process in which boundaries can be explored and in which the idea of 'cracked media' – whose performers challenge the intended effect of the technology and actively use alternative acts through subversive acts of abuse and misconception to generate results – is an interesting one.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Black MIDI is a beautiful example of how new technology/consumer electronics and their abuse lead to new implications and applications.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Though the two are unrelated in origin, the concept of impossible piano existed long before black MIDI, manifesting itself within Conlon Nancarrow's work involving player pianos, where he punched holes in piano cards to create extremely complex musical compositions in the same impossible, unplayable spirit of black MIDI.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


It was uploaded to the site ‘Nico Nico Douga’ in 2009, and public awareness of black MIDI started to spread from Japan to China and Korea over the following two years.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The black MIDI community in Japan vanished quickly because, according to Jason Nguyen (owner of the channel 'Gingeas'), the group was 'analogous to those TV shows where there’s a mysterious founder of a civilisation that is not really known throughout the course of the show.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The popularity of black MIDI transitioned into Europe and the United States due to a video of a composition uploaded by Kakakakaito1998 in February 2011.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Shortly thereafter, blackers from around the world began pushing limits of the style by making compositions with notes increasing into the millions and using an enormous number of colours and patterns to match the complexity of the notes.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


They also formed the sites 'Guide to Black MIDI' and 'Official Black MIDI Wikia', which introduced and set the norm of black MIDI.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The first of these tracks to reach the million-note mark was that of 'Necrofantasia' from the Touhou Project video game 'Perfect Cherry Blossom', arranged by TheTrustedComputer.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The number of notes and the sizes of the playback files have grown with the rising amount of processing and 64-bit programs, which computers are now able to handle.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Despite this increased computer storage, there are still black MIDI files that could cause an operating system to slow down.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Due to the nature of their creation and their sheer size, they are unable to be played back and recorded.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Blackers around the world have used software such as Synthesia, FL Studio, SynthFont, Virtual MIDI Piano Keyboard, Piano From Above, MIDITrail, vanBasco Karaoke Player, MIDIPlayer (Java program), MAMPlayer, Music Studio Producer, Singer Song Writer, Tom's MIDI Player, TMIDI and Timidity++ to create black MIDIs.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Some of them, like Jason, record the MIDI files at a slow tempo and then speed up the footage in video editing to avoid RAM and processing issues.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The term 'black MIDI' is derived from how there are so many notes in each piece that the score would look nearly black (or would look really black) when transposed to the form of traditional sheet music.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


According to California-based blacker TheTrustedComputer, black MIDI was intended as more of a remix style than an actual genre, and derived from the idea of 'bullet hell' shoot 'em up games, which involved 'so many bullets at a time your eyes can't keep up.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Black MIDI has also been considered the digital equivalent, as well as a response to composer Conlon Nancarrow's use of the player piano, which also involved experimenting with several thick notes to compose intricate pieces without hands.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The Guide to Black MIDI', however, denies this influence, stating that, 'We believe that references to Conlon Nancarrow and piano rolls are too deep and black MIDI origins must be found in digital MIDI music world.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Black MIDI first received coverage by Michael Connor, a writer for the non-profit arts organisation Rhizome, in September 2013, leading to attention from publications and bloggers including 'Aux', 'Gawker's Adrian Chen', 'Jason Kottke' and 'The Verge'.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


It has garnered acclaim from journalists, bloggers and electronic musicians, with many noting it as a distinctive and engaging genre thanks to how regular piano notes are combined to make new, abstract sounds not heard in many styles of music, as well as the visuals representing the notes.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Hackaday's Elliot Williams spotlighted the style as ironic, given that the fast-paced arpeggios and 'splatter-chords', developed with a restricted number of voices, come together to make other tones that lead to a piano sounding more like a chiptune and less like an actual piano.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


In 'Spectral Arrows', Fusinato arrives at the venue when it opens for business, sets up his equipment facing a wall and proceeds to play for the whole day until the end of business hours.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Fusinato presents himself here in the guise of a worker, clocking on and unceremoniously clocking off at the end of the day, refusing to allow the behind-the-scenes mystery of rehearsals and preparations to lend an aura to the performance, and affirming the deskilled ethos of his work.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


For the audience, the length of the performance frustrates the expectation of a manageable form, forcing all but the hardiest audience members to find contentment with only a fragment of the whole.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Even for those who stick it out, the extended duration, like in the late works of Morton Feldman, destroys the listener's ability to retain and assess the structure of the performance.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


As most of his work engages with highly political issues, we invited him to do a performance within the context of the event 'MUSIC & CAPITALISM'.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


He suggested that he could do an eight-hour performance in an official office building, on a Saturday from 09:00 to 17:00.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


People were guided to the eighth floor and into the directors room, which was darkened with newspapers stacked on the windows.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


As a musician, Fusinato explores the notion of noise as music, using the electric guitar and associated electronics to improvise intricate, wide-ranging and physically affecting frequencies.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Specifically, working with facsimile sheets of the score, Fusinato draws lines from each note on the page to one chosen point.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


In these works, treated by Fusinato as propositions for new noise compositions, the qualities of each individual note and their relation to those around them are effectively compressed into a single point of intense concentration.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Fusinato's intervention into the scores therefore visualises and proposes the possibility of a dialectical energy running through the original work that has a political dimension as much as an artistic one – a relentless propensity to both destruction and expressive creation in the single action, or, in this case, to the production of noise.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


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