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Sentences that have that in common :


The first stop is at Pinkie Bowtie, Antwerp, where we will introduce the entity of TGC#3 as the an unknown music magazine that it is, while pointing out its specific features by demonstrating the floppy works that already reside in the collection.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


It will unfold through a nomadic program that includes the creation of newly commissioned artworks and public events that address contemporary questions and issues pertinent in this particular field.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


It will seek concepts and configurations that produce new, previously unknown, relationships in the field of sound, visual arts and performance.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


The incentive for this project is the belief that graphic notation in twentieth-century avant-garde music and sound art constitutes an important, still radically innovative but wrongfully marginalised form, which can play a key role in the development of new audiovisual languages and media.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Our ambition, and that of our collaborating partners, is to emancipate graphic notation from the confines of the modernist tradition, in such a way that it may remain an innovative and provocative medium for decades to come.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Some dare to say that it’s a kind of jukebox.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


We proposed to the students that they devise an issue of our publication Tetra Gamma Circulaire.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


He focuses mainly on acoustic phenomena that have a dynamic relationship with their environment.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


I already knew the work of Charlemagne and we had also met during earlier events, so it was instantly clear that we could do something together that would make sense for the exhibition and ourselves.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


The ink was absorbed by the books and, after drying, it turned out to be a series of morphing colours that shifted with each page turn.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


The image duplicated in the zine is a drawing that is engraved on the glass plate of the copy machine itself.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Because his work is pretty conceptual, you could say that there is always a strategy (call it a score) that operates as a framework underpinning his artistic output.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


We had previously worked with Kris Delacourt on 'Principium 2.0', which is a reinterpretation of Colson’s work 'Principium', and so it was a natural progression that we then asked Colson to work on a sound publication with us.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


It is a complex work that nevertheless manages to remain simple and accessible in its final execution.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Principium 2.0 release - Remörk (Kris Delacourt), DE PLAYER This release has a shifting one-note drone (I believe I used D, F#, A, G#) that gets turned on and off by a magnetic sensor.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The funny thing is that after the presentation at Stadslimiet, the recordings of this eight-hour performance were edited back to a 12" vinyl record, which was released by the label Ultra Eczema shortly after.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Colson used tiny paper sticker dots, the kind that most art galleries use to denote which works in a show have been sold.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's just that Kris Delacourt was so intrigued by the leftover sticker sheets, with their eight by twelve grid they just screamed 'SEQUENCER!
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The sequencer controller is a reed switch matrix that, when a magnet is present, allows step pulses to pass to digital switches that bridge the original Casio keys.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


At least, that's where the initial form and the name came from.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


He made these beautiful pieces where he used tiny paper sticker dots, you know the ones that most art galleries use to denote which works in a show have been sold?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's all pretty nonsensical in a way I guess, especially if you try to put something like that into words, but it’s also really beautiful, and quite fragile.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And at a certain point he posed something like: 'I've made some work that might be interesting to use as a score, would you be up for it?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The funny thing was that he thought his resulting collages would be nice to use as scores – and they probably would be – but it's just that I was so intrigued by the leftover sticker sheets, with their eight by twelve grid that just screamed 'SEQUENCER!
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


, that I went in that direction.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I don't know if I need to go into too much technical detail, but the sequencer controller is just a reed switch matrix that, when a magnet is present, allow step pulses to pass to digital switches that bridge the original Casio keys.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I was really happy with the results, and especially with the fact that it's so inviting towards an audience.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And I never gave it that much thought, but the fact that when you stick magnets somewhere it makes a musical phrase, well, I guess to some people that would be wizardry, hah.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The first hesitation was that the Casio version really works best through audience interaction – people moving magnets around, changing the sounds on the keyboard and so on.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The idea of just me making a record totally ignores that, and to me it turns it into something really static and rigid.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


For example, there's this box set which has records that have built-in radio transmitters, records with impossible shapes where you need to turn the stylus of your record player upside down.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Shit like that, really great stuff.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And I don't know, maybe part of me wanted to be a part of that history, more than just doing a 'recording'.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I played around with filtering and octaves, because during testing we'd found that if we used slowly evolving records, the results were a lot more interesting.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Vaast and Dennis Tyfus of Ultra Eczema run a space in Antwerp together called Stadslimiet, and that's where we had the record presentation.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I followed that score for eight hours straight.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Funny thing was that we’d agreed to let it run until 23:00, and at about two minutes to then I got the first ever instruction to leave all the turntables empty.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


After that, Dennis asked me if I wanted to do a release of the recordings.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


So I went through eight hours of recordings, selecting bits that I liked and that I thought would be interesting enough to listen to as pieces in their own right, and not just as part of this monster performance.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


So that's what happened.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: Oh, I think it's definitely something that's still evolving.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Why was that?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Was one of your fears that, by making it into a 12", you would have to bring this project to a final version?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I guess that fear was much more of an issue with DOB Records.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But having made that 12" vinyl version, and having done a performance that worked quite well, I didn’t mind starting from what is essentially the documentation of a past event.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Also because I really am convinced that this is just one more step towards something that can keep going, that it doesn't have to be final.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I guess my main fear was that by cutting chunks out of a much larger whole, you risk losing the context – and I'm still not sure what this record sounds like to people that weren't there.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


How do you do that?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Sometimes I preferred elements because of harmonic information, notes that work well together, sometimes because of rhythms that worked well, etc.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And then you go through that selection again.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But to be honest I've never even considered that – eight hours of material and endless editing possibilities, that's a nightmare.., The decision to have straight up documentation, just select bits instead of editing them some more, really made the selection process easier.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I think I ended up with five or six pieces that I though could hold their own on a record, four of which made the final cut.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: Do you think that, by bringing it back to an LP, you're making it easier for the listener?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Do you think that listening to an eight-hour performance demands another kind of concentration from the listener than listening to an LP?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: There were some people there that sat through the whole thing, yes.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And that was never the question either.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: Weren't you afraid at some point that this whole idea would grow over your head, that it would become too complicated, too smart, too conceptual?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: I guess there was the point where I decided to just do a ten-minute organ improvisation, that was a bit of a turning point.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But I really needed a break from thinking it over and to just do something... Plus, it adds a much needed layer of spontaneity that works beautifully, not in the least musically, so no regrets.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: I could say that the 10" records were vinyl records as a tool, and that this LP is a vinyl record as a product.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But they do form one big piece, and as far as final forms go, I guess you could consider the performance to be the final form of that particular piece.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Of course, taking what is essentially a medium for reproducing and turning it into something of an instrument in it's own right again, that's nothing new – think hip hop, turntablism, even things like the Mellotron did that.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's a result of that whole chain reaction, so in that way it's definitely the result of collaborating with all those people.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


He always stressed, right from the start, that any interpretation I gave of his work was no longer his work.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And I follow that.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


That's awesome, and I'm flattered to be a part of that, but in a way it's also what record labels are supposed to be doing, no?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The notion that an idea can be just as valid and just as creative as its execution.., But anyway, I am always glad if I manage to turn an idea into a physical form.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But then, I don’t fully agree that you miss out on creativity by sticking to a concept.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Does it feel like that for you too: As your first 'real' album, as a statement?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: I think I would consider that series of twelve 10" my vinyl debut, but maybe because it was twelve different records or in 10" format it doesn't really count?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Or maybe Dennis thinks of that series as a tool more than a product.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Still, the Ultra Eczema one is definitely the first record that is more widely available, and much more of a pure record than an artist's edition, so I know what he’s saying.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's a document of what I'm happy to be working on at the moment, and hopefully it's something that others can enjoy as well.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I don't feel this record has that.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The only things remotely close to jumpcuts that are on this record were due to the electronics of the installation, the sensors turning the sound on and off.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: I certainly do hope that it's enjoyable.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But I did try to select bits that I thought had a beauty or a strong appeal to them, an interesting evolution or whatever, so much so that I hope they can survive as musical pieces in their own right.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


With 'Resonanz', Telcosystems presents an electronic book that combines a series of visual artworks and a sound publication.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Resonanz' is an electronic book that I had first dismissed.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Julia's solo live performances primarily refer to the modified vinyl records that produce extraordinary sounds.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


For the 'PUSHING' event, Derek will do a reading entitled 'Schematic as Score: Uses and Abuses of the (In)Deterministic Possibilities of Sound Technology', and after that he will do a live set based on researching analogue visuals with the oscilloscope.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The reading begins by noting that over the past few years a strong reaction against the sterile world of laptop sound and video has inspired a new interest in analogue processes, or 'hands dirty' art, in the words of practitioner John Richards.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


They approach DE PLAYER for some input surrounding the production and distribution of it, and because of the direct relation between sound and image, and the new interface an object like that represents, it was a clear match of interests.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In his article 'New Plasticism in Music: Possibilities of the Gramophone', László Moholy-Nagy said that it lies in the peculiarity of human nature that: The abuse and misunderstanding [of the record form] are necessary to gain results.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In other words, this means that reproduction (repetitions of already existing relations) without richer viewpoints from the special standpoint of creative production can, only in the best cases, be considered as a virtuosic opportunity.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


It has been beneficial for us because the format allowed us to reach an audience that would otherwise never come to DE PLAYER itself.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


For this year's festival, it was clear to us that we should present the 'Pushing Scores' project.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


Within this framework we presented newly produced works, made specifically for 'Pushing Scores', alongside existing works that we thought would be interesting to combine.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


By doing so, we developed a multidimensional approach to the tactics that can be used for making scores and how the outcomes could finally exist as a tradable object.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


Hiele Martens, or the collaboration of Lieven Martens Moana and Roman Hiele, delve deeply into new territory that could be interpreted as a 2017 update of Maurice Kagel's 'Exotica', but made by self-aware electronic musicians.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Currently she is constructing a digital and physical web; weaving together the overlapping, intuitive and sometimes complicated interconnections that comprise her interest in handcraft, witchcraft and digitalcraft.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The main threads that run between these interests are the experience of women, their traditional work and their sharing of knowledge.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Bergmark is the ultimate rethinker of what music can be, in sound and in performance, evidenced by the fact that you can sometimes find him hanging on two piano strings from a ceiling.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


It resulted in the Tetra Gamma Circular #3, subtitled 'An unknown audio magazine', and is in itself a certain kind of publication platform that functions almost as a jukebox for floppy disks.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The audience has the opportunity to control the dancers' steps on stage through a web interface that shows her personal approach to graphically representing ten jive steps.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


For TGC#3 he developed a tool that is a learning counterpart to his own musical input.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


ARCHIVING 'PUSHING SCORES' WITH VALENTINA VUKSIC, ANA GUEDES, VARIA AND NIEK HILKMANN Thu 29 Nov 2018 20:00 @ Varia, Rotterdam During this evening we will focus on archiving our 'Pushing Scores' project, a project interrogating the meaning of the 'graphic score' that has been running for the last two to three years.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


The idea is that this material will be embodied by a dynamic, accessible and therefore active archive, which creates new relations, new perspectives and, at its best, new concepts for the production and/or processes of making scores.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


Valentina Vuksic will also bring a live performance in which she approaches computers with transducers that transform electromagnetic radiation into sound within choreographed setups.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


A mobile website that connects you to the hardware inside the cabinet and turns your phone into a local speaker for a polyphonic voice piece.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


The Small Museum, the former announcement box at the front of Paradiso, is being converted by Remco van Bladel into a local WiFi point that will stream a polyphonic 'Pa-Ra-Di-So'.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


An algorithmic choir is compiled live by the mobile phones that connect to the WiFi point while audiences are waiting in line to enter Paradiso.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


The invitation was perfectly suited for a project in public space that he had in mind for 'Pushing Scores'.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


The Small Museum, which was previously used to house the public announcements of the church, will be transformed into a local WiFi hotspot to stream a multi vocal 'Pa-Ra-Di-So Rapsodia' – a live algorithmic choir composition created through the phones that connected to the WiFi, and therefore the score, while waiting to enter the building.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


This method of conducting, called 'cheironomy', consisted of writing signs in the air that contained clear instructions for the trained choir singers in terms of pitch change, duration and tone strength.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


Attali believes that music has gone through four specific cultural stages throughout its history: 1.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


What kind of scores can be made with the myriad of new techniques and media that have been developed since Attali's writing, and which are definitely influential on our conceptual thinking of music and its reproduction.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


The argument of 'Noise' is that music, unique among the arts for reasons that are themselves overdetermined, has precisely this annunciatory vocation; that the music of today stands both as a promise of a new, liberating mode of production, and as the menace of a dystopian possibility – which stands as that mode of production's baleful mirror image.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


We knew that Remco had written an essay called 'Musical Theories in Graphic Design' – on the subject of graphic notation within a broader field of theory formation in contemporary music – and felt it would be a good match to work together on a research project about the graphic score.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


His artistic practice is formed by a number of ingredients that have always been present in his work to a greater or lesser extent.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


Sound in relation to image remains an elusive phenomenon that continues to fascinate him because sound/music is the most abstract art form.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


He came up with the idea to give a reading of his text 'Schematics as a Score', because that was a current issue of his practice.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


In it he considers it axiomatic that, for every work of art that must be considered experimental, the possibility of failure must be built into its process.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


By this he does not mean the aestheticised, satisfying disturbances and cracking that Kim Cascone valorises, but the lack of satisfaction caused by a misplaced or misdirected procedure in the experiment, colossal or banal.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


These are not mistakes that should be looked up, sampled and celebrated, but the flat-on-your-ass gaffs and embarrassment that would disturb the sleep of all but the most Zen of musicians or composers.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


But this unwanted presence also guarantees the vitality of that fiercely fought area – the live electronic music performance.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


John Cage once quipped that Serge Tcherepnin's synthesizer system was 'the best musical composition that Serge had ever made', and it is precisely Cage's reformulation of the concert score from a list of deterministic note values to a set of indeterminable possibilities that allowed the blurring of lines between instrument-builder and music composer that followed.
└ from 15 — Schematic as Design


Vector graphics were widely adopted by video game manufacturers in the late 1970s due to their computational efficiency, and the wealth of experience using them that the history of analogue computing provided.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


The fact that many aspects of our current utopian aspirations (and dystopian anxieties!
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


remain largely unchanged since the dawn of the Vectorian Era indicates to me that seeking to satisfy them with technology alone is quite problematic.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


He described his own art as a way of 'ensuring that the details of everyday life, the random constellations of objects that surround us, stop going unnoticed.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


Of specific inspiration is the fact that his works are composed of simple instructions and can be performed by anybody, giving them a highly democratic factor without losing their artistic impact.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


The fact that the work is purely language-based also hones in on our interest, as DE PLAYER has been publishing and presenting a lot of sound poetry over the years.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


A baton is a stick that is used by conductors primarily to enlarge and enhance the manual and bodily movements associated with directing an ensemble of musicians.
└ from 18 — Dirigeerstok


This method of conducting, called 'cheironomy', consisted of writing signs in the air that contained clear instructions for the trained choir singers in terms of pitch change, duration and tone strength.
└ from 18 — Dirigeerstok


For this he developed specific software that generates poetry in spoken-word form.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


For each record a unique piece is generated that is spoken and performed by the same software.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


The packaging of each record is also linked to the unique file and consists of an original visual work that is derived from or transformed via a formula from the programming language that underlies the audio poems present on the record.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


DE PLAYER is interested in sound that fraternies in the abstract sense and makes people communicate with each other, without having to understand each other specifically in terms of language.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


It is important here that the language is sung off the usual value of speech.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


Within 'Radical Listening' we want to see what the possibilities of communication and publishing are with the current means that are available to us.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


computers, record players and effect equipment) and a variety of speech techniques, are adopted so that, among other things, classical reading forms are exceeded.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


IRREGULAR #2313 STRIPPED Fri 14 Oct 2011 21:00 @ Wall Gallery, Rotterdam with Fersteinn Fersteinn (IS) is a quartet of multi-instrumentalists that play compositions by Guðmundur Steinn Gunnarsson, a repertoire that is written especially for the ensemble.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


They are a group that plays music in an 'extra-musical' or 'non-musical' sort of rhythm (so to speak).
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


During the performance, the musicians follow specific instructions that move across a computer screen.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


Instead of using traditional musical scores during the performance, the musicians follow specific instructions that move across a computer screen.
└ from 22 — Anitation


In that way, the most irregular things can become very intelligible.
└ from 22 — Anitation


Some of the festivals that have included Guðmundur’s music are Tectonics Festival (both Reykjavík and Glasgow), MATA, Musikin Aika, Ultima, November Music, Transit, Music for People and Thingamajigs, Nordlichter Biennale, Timisoara International Music Festival and the Irish Sound, Science and Technology Convocation in 2014, where Guðmundur was also keynote speaker.
└ from 22 — Anitation


The reader will see inscriptions that oscillate between pictures and writing, and between visual and auditory, exemplifying those capacities of drawing to operate in the spaces between languages.
└ from 23 — Silence


I think silence has that same relation with music.
└ from 23 — Silence


Emptiness has that same relation with notation.
└ from 23 — Silence


For much less money than Kreidler himself received as a commission, he had pieces ready for concert that were made for him in China and India.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


The plant is deliberately located in a legal gray area, which has been greatly enlarged by digital technologies, so that it is impossible to clarify the case so far.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Her project 'UNTITLED RECORDS' is a performative sound installation that interweaves historical and emotional narratives through the 'instrumentalisation' of a collection of vinyl records.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


Her spider web record player, which she developed for this purpose, is an instrument that plays, registers and converts a spider web into sound by means of light sensors.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


However, my favourite spider myth is from Greek mythology; that of Arachne, who wove a tapestry better than Athena, the Goddess of weaving and war.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


The idea of a graphic score, a readable gesture, aids in the playability/repeatability of a piece of music that through its repetition allows for exploration, interpretation and imagination.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


These spiders have laid out scores in the form of webs that are barely visible ephemera drifting between branches or street signs or windows and I long to understand them.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


We became acquainted with Helga Jakobson's work through Bas van den Hurk, who at the time of introduction was teaching on the postgraduate program that Helga took part in at St Joost.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


Bas encouraged her to contact DE PLAYER as she was occupied with developing a machine that produces sound through the process of reading spider webs.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


We had an appointment and it was immediately clear that this project was of interest to us and we decided to present her prototype at an event in which other inventive ways of sound making were presented.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


In addition, it places itself in the tradition of electro acoustic music and 'musique concrète' – a French music movement that makes use of everyday sounds that are processed with the help of electronics into compositions and sound collages.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


What is the relationship between the sounds of mining and the community that surrounds them?
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In it he found the fragility of mining processes and the impact that mining activities have on the population and their biotope.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Thus, different layers of time are presented, from slowly unfolding sounds that represent a deep geological time, to sounds of transport, to the kind of sounds that we recognise as science fiction to indicate the future.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


For example, mining is in the arctic zone, and an asteroid mining law was adopted in Luxembourg in 2017 that gives companies ownership of what they extract from celestial bodies.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The idea is that you find an asteroid that is really rich in some rare metal that we really need and that one can claim.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


For example, in the composition radio broadcasts from space are used as well as a recoding of the probe that has ended up on an asteroid.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In this way, the work creates a third space that belongs to the individual listener and that arises from the interaction between the original space and the imaginary space, created by the composition, the sound processing and the perception of the listener.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


We thought he would fit very well in the 'E-ARTHHA' event with Douglas Kahn that we were already busy with planning.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


I also went to Näätämö/Neiden and just over the border to Finland because it’s land of the Sámi, and I wanted to have that in.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Throughout the landscape there are sacred stones that are very important to them.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


I think it is important to explore the changes that the surrounding landscape and the mining site itself are undergoing, from active to closed, from contaminated landscape to re-vegetation.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The future is represented through using radio emissions from space and a recoding from the probe that landed on the comet 67P/Churyumov–Gerasimenko.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


What I like about these recordings is that they already have been processed through the rock and soil and transposed into human hearing range...
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The ore layer contains only a certain amount of the mineral that will bring you revenue.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It just turned out that way, perhaps because that's how we generally tend to structure material.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


But the chronology is interrupted a couple of times, and the different time planes are cut-up; they interact and overlap, because I mix sound recordings that were done at different times.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In that way I present different layers of time, from slowly unfolding sounds that represent deep geological time, to sounds of transport, to the sort of sounds we recognise as science fiction to denote the future.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The work creates a third space that belongs to the individual listener and which arises from the interaction between the original space and imaginary space, created through the composition and sound processing… We dig deep into the earth to get to layers of deep time, extract it and use the ancient material, in the case of coal, for electricity, for heating the house, commodities, to type a message on a phone.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It’s millions of years compressed into hard materials that are burned up, like coal, or painstakingly refined to yield useful metal.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


This ungraspable void of deep time fascinates me: The time compressed in iron ore, the coal that started billions of years ago as organic material, the gold flecked asteroid far away in space, or the more recent 'slambanken' in Kirkenes – a manmade landscape of unusable slag that might be mined in the future .
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


We trace out all the veins of the earth, and yet, living upon it, undermined as it is beneath our feet, are astonished that it should occasionally cleave asunder or tremble: As though, forsooth, these signs could be any other than expressions of the indignation felt by our sacred parent!
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Pliny the Elder, 'Naturalis Historia, book XXXIII', p. 77, data.perseus.org/citations/urn:cts:latinLit:phi0978.phi001.perseus-eng1:33.1 'If, as Novalis and many of his friends believed, stones, metals and rock strata amount to transcriptions of the earth's history, what better place to study that history than in the mines and caverns of the earth, where the entire record is preserved and exposed?
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


At this point the ancient conception of mines and mountain caverns as places of lapidary activity encounters a second folkoristic notion – that in the interior of mountains time stands still.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The slambanken is a totally artificial, man-made landscape that has formed because the waste of the iron ore processing was flushed into the fjord.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


We have a tunnel that leads there.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


We were living quite close to the railway, so when the train did not run we knew instantaneously that something had happened, either in the mine or in the mill.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Except for the mining, but that then is also why I find mining in the Arctic especially interesting.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The relentless nature in the Arctic constantly reminds you that you are a human being and that you are not really supposed to be there because the harshness of the environment might kill you.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It's good for the human psyche to be reminded of that.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Will it mean that other places will become desolate instead, uninhabitable?
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


These can be an indicator that something is about to happen, the sounds tell something about the stability of the rock.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It’s mostly really low sounds that you have to transpose up three times to get within human hearing range.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


For me it relates directly to iron ore in so far that the type of musique concrète and tape music developed at GRM was made possible by magnetic tape.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It is a process that somehow relates to my own artistic process.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The selection of sounds is done according to properties that lie outside the predictable controllable parameters in order to arrive at a complex multidimensional listening experience.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


By compactly interweaving the frequencies, a different image is created for the listener at each listening session because of the psycho-acoustic selections that take place at the level of the listener.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


The fact that the sound on the record is an ever-changing piece – because of the psycho acoustic effects – transposes it more into a tool than a static recording.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


He has a particular interest in the abstruse technological condition we are living in and the insufficient intellectual methodologies that seek to justify, or explain it.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


It is based in Rotterdam in the same area that we operate in.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


The idea is that this material will be embodied by a dynamic, accessible and therefore active archive, which creates new relations, new perspectives and, at its best, new concepts for the production and/or processes of making scores.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


Black MIDI' is a music genre consisting of compositions that use MIDI files to create song remixes containing a large number of notes, typically in the thousands or millions, and sometimes billions.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


DE PLAYER has always had a strong interest in emancipating publishing from its stereotypical understanding as merely making things public – an understanding that comes from an historical and economic media constraint linked to the print, software, music and film industries, and that has limited any form of meaningful, explorative, complementary or conflictual combinations between media in the field of cultural production.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Transformation of information is a fact that occurs during the process of composing and performing the compositions.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


In that sense, there is never a perfect reproduction but always an interpretation.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The black MIDI community in Japan vanished quickly because, according to Jason Nguyen (owner of the channel 'Gingeas'), the group was 'analogous to those TV shows where there’s a mysterious founder of a civilisation that is not really known throughout the course of the show.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The first of these tracks to reach the million-note mark was that of 'Necrofantasia' from the Touhou Project video game 'Perfect Cherry Blossom', arranged by TheTrustedComputer.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Despite this increased computer storage, there are still black MIDI files that could cause an operating system to slow down.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The term 'black MIDI' is derived from how there are so many notes in each piece that the score would look nearly black (or would look really black) when transposed to the form of traditional sheet music.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The Guide to Black MIDI', however, denies this influence, stating that, 'We believe that references to Conlon Nancarrow and piano rolls are too deep and black MIDI origins must be found in digital MIDI music world.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Hackaday's Elliot Williams spotlighted the style as ironic, given that the fast-paced arpeggios and 'splatter-chords', developed with a restricted number of voices, come together to make other tones that lead to a piano sounding more like a chiptune and less like an actual piano.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


He suggested that he could do an eight-hour performance in an official office building, on a Saturday from 09:00 to 17:00.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Fusinato's intervention into the scores therefore visualises and proposes the possibility of a dialectical energy running through the original work that has a political dimension as much as an artistic one – a relentless propensity to both destruction and expressive creation in the single action, or, in this case, to the production of noise.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


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