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Sentences that have s in common :


Throughout the project, Jacques Attali’s book, 'Noise: The Political Economy of Music', will function as a reference and inspirational guide; pushing the score in search of its current potential.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Some dare to say that it’s a kind of jukebox.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


It’s not a matter of an event between spectators and a musician– it’s a space to submit to a process.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


We were discussing several projects and possibilities for collaboration with Defne Ayas and Samuel Saelemakers of Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art when they asked us to participate in Charlemagne Palestine's exhibition 'GesammttkkunnsttMeshuggahhLaandtttt' by organising a live event.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Yann Gourdon was asked to do a hurry-curdy noisette while Charlemagne's books were projected page by page on the wall.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


We had previously worked with Kris Delacourt on 'Principium 2.0', which is a reinterpretation of Colson’s work 'Principium', and so it was a natural progression that we then asked Colson to work on a sound publication with us.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Colson's works examine core questions: What power does art have to change us and our society?
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


In his work, Colson constantly questions the relationship with the audience and is also strongly interested in mythology and the authentic (or not) mystique of the artist's existence, which he usually explores in his performances.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


The magnets for the sensor ride on top of the record player's platter and could be placed freely to make your own patterns.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


For it, Kris Delacourt (Remörk) had made a modified Casio keyboard as a reinterpretation of Vaast Colson's work 'Principium'.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's just that Kris Delacourt was so intrigued by the leftover sticker sheets, with their eight by twelve grid they just screamed 'SEQUENCER!
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Principium 2.0' is then another piece in step with the principle of Colson's original 'Principium'.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


At least, that's where the initial form and the name came from.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's all pretty nonsensical in a way I guess, especially if you try to put something like that into words, but it’s also really beautiful, and quite fragile.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The funny thing was that he thought his resulting collages would be nice to use as scores – and they probably would be – but it's just that I was so intrigued by the leftover sticker sheets, with their eight by twelve grid that just screamed 'SEQUENCER!
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's an iron board and it has the same visuals as the sticker sheets.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I was really happy with the results, and especially with the fact that it's so inviting towards an audience.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's meant to be in a continued state of flux.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


For example, there's this box set which has records that have built-in radio transmitters, records with impossible shapes where you need to turn the stylus of your record player upside down.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Vaast and Dennis Tyfus of Ultra Eczema run a space in Antwerp together called Stadslimiet, and that's where we had the record presentation.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


So that's what happened.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: Oh, I think it's definitely something that's still evolving.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


There's something appealing in using a single octave as a building block.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


There’s something appealing in the number twelve even, and there's the appeal of building instruments too.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I know it's not a final version, but it is a version nonetheless, and I want all versions to be of a certain quality.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


That's quite brutal to listen to in concentration, to be honest.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But to be honest I've never even considered that – eight hours of material and endless editing possibilities, that's a nightmare.., The decision to have straight up documentation, just select bits instead of editing them some more, really made the selection process easier.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Still, not sure if it is easy listening at all, although I think it has a beauty of it's own.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I like working with concepts a lot, as a starting point, but I'm also interested enough in the results to loosen up the concept if I feel it's needed.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


That's also purely pragmatic: Now they've all been sold, it's going to be very difficult to get all twelve of them together again for a second performance.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Of course, taking what is essentially a medium for reproducing and turning it into something of an instrument in it's own right again, that's nothing new – think hip hop, turntablism, even things like the Mellotron did that.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But it's still a relevant idea to me, this kind of creative misuse.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


There's Vaast Colson, Peter Flenger and Dennis Tyfus too.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Now, I never would have though it up if it weren't for Vaast's initial invitation, or for Peter asking me to do a record, or Dennis wanting to present it in Antwerp.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's a result of that whole chain reaction, so in that way it's definitely the result of collaborating with all those people.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


That's awesome, and I'm flattered to be a part of that, but in a way it's also what record labels are supposed to be doing, no?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But musically, I still feel it’s my work.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And the same goes for this record on Ultra Eczema: I have to say I'm really happy we finally got an Ultra Eczema release together, it's something Dennis had been asking for for quite some time... He’d actually given up asking.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


That's just another way of letting things go, of giving up control.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Still, the Ultra Eczema one is definitely the first record that is more widely available, and much more of a pure record than an artist's edition, so I know what he’s saying.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's a document of what I'm happy to be working on at the moment, and hopefully it's something that others can enjoy as well.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: I certainly do hope that it's enjoyable.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Like I said, I know it's not easy listening per se, and some might probably find it boring at first try, with the tempo being the same for the whole record and all.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's strangely hypnotising.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Julia's solo live performances primarily refer to the modified vinyl records that produce extraordinary sounds.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Julia's peculiar method of modifying vinyl records includes various forms of physical treatment such as sewing, painting or pasting the vinyl surfaces.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Informed by the discourse of media archaeology, my own personal interest in analogue vector graphics isn't merely retro-for-retro's-sake.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


For this year's festival, it was clear to us that we should present the 'Pushing Scores' project.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


HIELE MARTENS (BE) Sometimes 1 + 1 is greater than the sum of its parts, but if you put two of Belgium's finest composers and musicians together, it adds up to an infinite number.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Hiele Martens, or the collaboration of Lieven Martens Moana and Roman Hiele, delve deeply into new territory that could be interpreted as a 2017 update of Maurice Kagel's 'Exotica', but made by self-aware electronic musicians.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


HELGA JAKOBSON (CA) Whether culminating in actions or objects, Helga Jakobson's work responds to conditions of limbo within existence and acts as a platform to confront the unknown, focusing on death, time and ephemerality.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Jakobson has great reverence for intuition and it's use as a technology within her work.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


XPUB (International) Experimental Publishing (XPUB) is a new course of the Piet Zwart Institute's Media Design and Communication Master programme.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


As another example, Max Franklin's research focuses on the fragile nature of improvisation in music, with software.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


After learning of Attali's book, 'Noise: The Political Economy of Music', we used it as inspiration for the project 'Pushing Scores'.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


What kind of scores can be made with the myriad of new techniques and media that have been developed since Attali's writing, and which are definitely influential on our conceptual thinking of music and its reproduction.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


The argument of 'Noise' is that music, unique among the arts for reasons that are themselves overdetermined, has precisely this annunciatory vocation; that the music of today stands both as a promise of a new, liberating mode of production, and as the menace of a dystopian possibility – which stands as that mode of production's baleful mirror image.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


In it he transposed compositional methodologies of the avant-gardists in the twentieth century to graphic design methodologies, for instance, by understanding Steve Reich's phase shifting technique through the lens of design.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


John Cage once quipped that Serge Tcherepnin's synthesizer system was 'the best musical composition that Serge had ever made', and it is precisely Cage's reformulation of the concert score from a list of deterministic note values to a set of indeterminable possibilities that allowed the blurring of lines between instrument-builder and music composer that followed.
└ from 15 — Schematic as Design


The 1972 Rutt-Etra Video Synthesizer, used famously by the Vasuka's in several works, employed an analogue computer to manipulate and deconstruct the raster of a conventional video signal with very otherworldly effects.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


Informed by the discourse of media archaeology, my own personal interest in analogue vector graphics isn't merely retro-for-retro's-sake.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


Steve Joy took me to meet George Brecht in his studio when I was in-residence at St Michael's in Manhattan in 1962.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


Jörg Piringer (AT) is a member of the Institute for Trans-acoustic Research, member of the Vegetable Orchestra, radio artist, sound poet, visual poet and musician, and holds a Master's degree in Computer Science.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


Gunnarsson's musical style combines sound patterns without using a rigid rhythmic grid structure or pulse.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


This rhythmic language and animated notation, and the structural methods he uses in composition, were the subject of his Master's thesis at Mills College.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


This rhythmic language and animated notation, and their subsequent structural methods, were the subject of Guðmundur Steinn Gunnarsson's Master's thesis at Mills College.
└ from 22 — Anitation


Guðmundur Steinn Gunnarsson has been part of DE PLAYER's programme with his quartet Fersteinn several times.
└ from 22 — Anitation


Some of the festivals that have included Guðmundur’s music are Tectonics Festival (both Reykjavík and Glasgow), MATA, Musikin Aika, Ultima, November Music, Transit, Music for People and Thingamajigs, Nordlichter Biennale, Timisoara International Music Festival and the Irish Sound, Science and Technology Convocation in 2014, where Guðmundur was also keynote speaker.
└ from 22 — Anitation


For this purpose, he was accompanied by numerous press representatives to deliver a small truck's worth of completed applications to the GEMA Directorate General in Berlin.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


How Could You) Bring Him Home' by Eamon ''(I'm Gonna Be) 500 Miles' by The Proclaimers with Brian Potter & Andy Pipkin '(Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear' by Elvis Presley with The Jordanaires ''(You Want To) Make A Memory' by Bon Jovi '1234' by Feist '1973' by James Blunt '2 Hearts' by Kylie Minogue '3's & 7's' by Queens Of The Stone Age '4 Am Forever' by Lostprophets '4 In The Morning' by Gwen Stefani '505' by Arctic Monkeys 'A Bad Dream' by Keane 'A Big Hunk O' Love' by Elvis Presley With The Jordanaires 'A Day In The Life' by Larrikin Love 'A Moment Like This' by Leona Lewis 'A Never Ending Dream' by Cascada 'A Public Affair' by Jessica Simpson 'A Whole New World' by Katie Price & Peter Andre 'About You Now' by Sugababes 'About Your Dress' by The Maccabees 'Acceptable In The 80s' by Calvin Harris 'Acrylic' by The Courteeners 'Adagio For Strings' by DJ Tiesto 'Ain't No Party' by Orson 'Alarm Clock' by The Rumble Strips 'Alfie' by Lily Allen 'All Good Things (Come To An End)' by Nelly Furtado 'All I Got' by Newton Faulkner 'All I Need To Know' by Emma Bunton 'All I Want For Christmas Is You' by Mariah Carey 'All My Friends' by LCD Soundsystem 'All She Wrote' by Ross Copperman 'Almost Easy' by Avenged Sevenfold 'Always On My Mind' by Elvis Presley 'Amazing' by Seal 'America' by Razorlight 'An American Trilogy' by Elvis Presley 'An End Has A Start' by Editors 'Anarchy In The UK' by The Sex Pistols 'Angel On My Shoulder' by Gareth Gates 'Annie Let's Not Wait' by Guillemots 'Anonymous' by Bobby Valentino feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Will.I.Am 'Baby When The Light' by David Guetta 'Baby's Coming Back' by McFly 'Baby's Coming Back/Transylvania' by McFly 'Back To Black' by Amy Winehouse 'Backfire At The Disco' by The Wombats 'Bad Girl (At Night)'' by Dave Spoon feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Andrea Britton 'Cowboy' by Ch!pz 'Crank That (Soulja Boy)' by Soulja Boy Tell'em 'Crash' by Matt Willis 'Crazy' by Lumidee 'Crazy' by Gnarls Barkley 'Crush Crush Crush' by Paramore 'Cry Over Me' by Meat Loaf 'Cupid's Chokehold' by Gym Class Heroes feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Crystal Waters 'Different World' by Iron Maiden 'Do It' by Nelly Furtado 'Do It 2 Me' by Cushh 'Do It Again' by The Chemical Brothers 'Do It Well' by Jennifer Lopez 'Do It Yourself (Go Out And Get It)' by Uniting Nations 'Do They Know It's Christmas?
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In Japan there's a focus on the lure of the spider, where it is sometimes likened to a prostitute.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


Using the material bequeathed to Arachne's doomed progeny, I've been weaving a visual and sonic tapestry of my own, using digital technology to form new means of mythologising and disseminating non-verbal experience.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


These webs then become a game of Cat's Cradle of sorts between the spider and I, not quite a collaboration but rather more of an exercise in ongoingness and recognition of loss.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


They remind me of George Crumb’s circular compositions; minus the pen and paper.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


In actuality, they are visual representations of the spider's consciousness (who can forget Dr. Peter Witt’s experiments with drug use on spiders and their resulting webs).
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


A spider web is not only an illustration of a spider's mental landscape, but an instrument it plucks and plays.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


We became acquainted with Helga Jakobson's work through Bas van den Hurk, who at the time of introduction was teaching on the postgraduate program that Helga took part in at St Joost.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


Magnetic tape was the medium of BJ Nilsen's youth.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


I also went to Näätämö/Neiden and just over the border to Finland because it’s land of the Sámi, and I wanted to have that in.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It's not iron ore but lignite, 'braunkohle'.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


That's why I wanted to have a thread about the regeneration of mining areas.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


This mining work is tied directly to the computer age, itself an alchemic expression of man's ingenious use of the earth.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It just turned out that way, perhaps because that's how we generally tend to structure material.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It's absurd when you start to think about it.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


So much time is compressed in this material and it's burned up in minutes.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It's not like wind or the sun, which give you immediate energy.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It’s millions of years compressed into hard materials that are burned up, like coal, or painstakingly refined to yield useful metal.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Pliny the Elder, 'Naturalis Historia, book XXXIII', p. 77, data.perseus.org/citations/urn:cts:latinLit:phi0978.phi001.perseus-eng1:33.1 'If, as Novalis and many of his friends believed, stones, metals and rock strata amount to transcriptions of the earth's history, what better place to study that history than in the mines and caverns of the earth, where the entire record is preserved and exposed?
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The landscape is fairly untouched, it is scarcely populated, it's desolate.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It's good for the human psyche to be reminded of that.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It’s mostly really low sounds that you have to transpose up three times to get within human hearing range.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In practice it's quite mathematical, but it still it is part of the sound world too.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It’s a kind of sound alchemy.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Duncan's work has a lasting influence on experimental music because his art is generally still refined and refined, and he regularly collaborates with young artists.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


Though the two are unrelated in origin, the concept of impossible piano existed long before black MIDI, manifesting itself within Conlon Nancarrow's work involving player pianos, where he punched holes in piano cards to create extremely complex musical compositions in the same impossible, unplayable spirit of black MIDI.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Black MIDI was first employed by Shirasagi Yukki at Kuro Yuki Gohan's rendition of 'U.N.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The black MIDI community in Japan vanished quickly because, according to Jason Nguyen (owner of the channel 'Gingeas'), the group was 'analogous to those TV shows where there’s a mysterious founder of a civilisation that is not really known throughout the course of the show.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Blackers around the world have used software such as Synthesia, FL Studio, SynthFont, Virtual MIDI Piano Keyboard, Piano From Above, MIDITrail, vanBasco Karaoke Player, MIDIPlayer (Java program), MAMPlayer, Music Studio Producer, Singer Song Writer, Tom's MIDI Player, TMIDI and Timidity++ to create black MIDIs.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Black MIDI has also been considered the digital equivalent, as well as a response to composer Conlon Nancarrow's use of the player piano, which also involved experimenting with several thick notes to compose intricate pieces without hands.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Black MIDI first received coverage by Michael Connor, a writer for the non-profit arts organisation Rhizome, in September 2013, leading to attention from publications and bloggers including 'Aux', 'Gawker's Adrian Chen', 'Jason Kottke' and 'The Verge'.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Hackaday's Elliot Williams spotlighted the style as ironic, given that the fast-paced arpeggios and 'splatter-chords', developed with a restricted number of voices, come together to make other tones that lead to a piano sounding more like a chiptune and less like an actual piano.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Spectral Arrows by Marco Fusinato (live recordings by Gerben Kokmeijer, edited by Marco Fusinato) Stuttering live concrete, wailing feedback, Xenakis-esque swarms of descending glissandi, abusive guitar wrangling, walls of harsh static on a double sided black vinyl containing edited sound from the live recording of Marco Fusinato's endurance performance 'Spectral Arrows' for DE PLAYER on 18 May 2013 at Groothandelsgebouw, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Even for those who stick it out, the extended duration, like in the late works of Morton Feldman, destroys the listener's ability to retain and assess the structure of the performance.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Breaking with both the traditional form of the musical performance and, through Fusinato’s resolutely antisocial position facing away from the audience, the standard affective relationship between audience and performer is broken.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


One of Marco's most-known projects is called 'Black Mass Implosion'.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Fusinato's 'Mass Black Implosion' series began in 2007.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Fusinato's intervention into the scores therefore visualises and proposes the possibility of a dialectical energy running through the original work that has a political dimension as much as an artistic one – a relentless propensity to both destruction and expressive creation in the single action, or, in this case, to the production of noise.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


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