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The meeting is open for members of the public who are interested in experimental ways of publishing or who just like to hang out amongst the ambience of artistic ‘nouveauté’.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


This can be a performance, an object, a book or whatever other form he settles on.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


In his work, Colson constantly questions the relationship with the audience and is also strongly interested in mythology and the authentic (or not) mystique of the artist's existence, which he usually explores in his performances.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Kris Delacourt: Well actually, it started out as an artwork, or rather a series of artworks.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


So we discussed other possibilities, like capturing a live performance, or possibly even cutting records on the fly with his vinyl lathe.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Basically, the program decided for me which records to play, whether to repeat them or not when they were finished, whether to leave the turntable empty, whether the electronics should punch holes in the sound when a magnet was detected or the opposite, how may magnets on each turntable and the playback volume.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: Is this LP the final version of this project, or do you see it evolving into future iterations?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I can still see unexplored possibilities there – as an installation, or as a truly playable musical instrument, and even those two do not have to be mutually exclusive.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I think I ended up with five or six pieces that I though could hold their own on a record, four of which made the final cut.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It was continually shifting, so it didn't really have a beginning or an end – you could drop in any time you liked.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I could have gone for something more 'correct' in terms of concept – I don't know, pure sine waves or something.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


So do you see this album as a solo record or as a collaboration?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Now, I never would have though it up if it weren't for Vaast's initial invitation, or for Peter asking me to do a record, or Dennis wanting to present it in Antwerp.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: I think I would consider that series of twelve 10" my vinyl debut, but maybe because it was twelve different records or in 10" format it doesn't really count?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I don't think of it as a manifesto or anything.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But I did try to select bits that I thought had a beauty or a strong appeal to them, an interesting evolution or whatever, so much so that I hope they can survive as musical pieces in their own right.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Incorporated into the structure of the book are sensors and electronics, providing each page with its own unique soundtrack, which can be listened to via speakers or headphones.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Incorporated into the structure of the book are sensors and electronics, providing each page with its own unique soundtrack, which can be listened to via speakers or headphones.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Julia's peculiar method of modifying vinyl records includes various forms of physical treatment such as sewing, painting or pasting the vinyl surfaces.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The reading begins by noting that over the past few years a strong reaction against the sterile world of laptop sound and video has inspired a new interest in analogue processes, or 'hands dirty' art, in the words of practitioner John Richards.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Artists and inventors such as Nam June Paik, Steina & Woody Vasulka, Don Buchla, Serge Tcherepnin, Dan Sandin and David Tudor all constructed their own unique instruments long before similar tools became commercially available or freely downloadable.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In the case of the 'prepared record', the record or musical piece is not used as a reproductive technique.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In contrast to the composer or musician who perceives the record first and foremost as a vehicle transporting his or her musical ideas, here the interest lies especially in the optical/sculptural, as well as the acoustic presence and the compression of an idea when working with the playback possibilities and impossibilities of recording techniques.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The end result is not a reproduction but a transformation of the original source and ultimately becomes an autonomous score and/or unique graphic/sculptural piece in and of itself.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


As production, meaning here productive creation, above all serves the human condition, we must attempt to further our purposes of creative production through the uses of those apparatuses or methods which until now have been used only for reproduction purposes.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Hiele Martens, or the collaboration of Lieven Martens Moana and Roman Hiele, delve deeply into new territory that could be interpreted as a 2017 update of Maurice Kagel's 'Exotica', but made by self-aware electronic musicians.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


HELGA JAKOBSON (CA) Whether culminating in actions or objects, Helga Jakobson's work responds to conditions of limbo within existence and acts as a platform to confront the unknown, focusing on death, time and ephemerality.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The local WiFi station makes it possible to access all projects (on floppy disk) by receiving these projects via a mobile phone or on the computer.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Most projects are aimed at interaction with an audience (of one or more people).
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Whether it is about recording movements for archiving, or writing new choreographies for the future, she concentrated on which elements of dance are overwritable (such as direction or footwork) and which are not.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The idea is that this material will be embodied by a dynamic, accessible and therefore active archive, which creates new relations, new perspectives and, at its best, new concepts for the production and/or processes of making scores.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


A seventh note, 'si' or 'ti', was added later.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


These signs, or 'neumens', were written down, modified or not, first without any reference line.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


Later, the neumens – depending on the relative pitch differences – were noted above, on or below a line referring to a pitch determined by the choral conductor.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


The second phase is important to the perspective of sound reproduction, graphic score and the tangibility of sound and/or the object.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


His artistic practice is formed by a number of ingredients that have always been present in his work to a greater or lesser extent.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


The most important, from his youth, is sound or music.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


Both as a source or inspiration, as a metaphor, as a thinking model and as an 'attitude' in relation to his practice.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


By this he does not mean the aestheticised, satisfying disturbances and cracking that Kim Cascone valorises, but the lack of satisfaction caused by a misplaced or misdirected procedure in the experiment, colossal or banal.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


These are not mistakes that should be looked up, sampled and celebrated, but the flat-on-your-ass gaffs and embarrassment that would disturb the sleep of all but the most Zen of musicians or composers.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


The presence of failure in a musical system represents feedback in the negative, a turning point in anticlimax, irrelevance, the everyday, the cliché or even unintentional silence.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


Many artists try to eliminate true, catastrophic failures by scripting, scoring, sequencing or programming their work in as many predictable, risk-free quantums as possible in advance.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


This has led to a new interest in analogue processes or 'dirty hands' art.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


Artists and inventors such as Nam June Paik, Steina and Woody Vasulka, Don Buchla, Serge Tcherepnin, Dan Sandin and David Tudor all constructed their own unique instruments long before similar tools became commercially available or could be freely downloaded.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


This has led to a new interest in analogue processes or 'dirty hands' art.
└ from 15 — Schematic as Design


Artists and inventors such as Nam June Paik, Steina & Woody Vasulka, Don Buchla, Serge Tcherepnin, Dan Sandin and David Tudor all constructed their own unique instruments long before similar tools became commercially available or could be freely downloaded.
└ from 15 — Schematic as Design


The Vector Synthesis library allows the creation and manipulation of 2D and 3D vector shapes, Lissajous figures and scan-processed image and video inputs using audio signals sent directly to oscilloscopes, hacked CRT monitors, Vectrex game consoles, ILDA laser displays or oscilloscope emulation softwares using the Pure Data programming environment.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


They then explored Lissajous figures, waveform representations and other multiplexed, audio-driven visual shapes and forms which can be displayed and manipulated in real-time on an XY oscilloscope, Vectrex game console, ILDA laser display and other analogue vector displays, or with oscilloscope emulating software directly on a laptop.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


These signs, or 'neumens', were written down, modified or not, first without any reference line.
└ from 18 — Dirigeerstok


Later, the neumens – depending on the relative pitch differences – were noted above, on or below a line referring to a pitch determined by the choral conductor.
└ from 18 — Dirigeerstok


The packaging of each record is also linked to the unique file and consists of an original visual work that is derived from or transformed via a formula from the programming language that underlies the audio poems present on the record.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


The style and/or genre determine the identity.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


a tape recorder or telephone), but also self-invented technical devices and software as well as other machines (e.g.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


They are a group that plays music in an 'extra-musical' or 'non-musical' sort of rhythm (so to speak).
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


Through his compositions he has developed a rhythmic language devoid of regular beat or metre, and he has created a new musical notation to represent his music.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


Gunnarsson's musical style combines sound patterns without using a rigid rhythmic grid structure or pulse.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


This approach has led to the development of his animated notation, or 'anitation', instead of using traditional musical scores.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


Guðmundur Steinn Gunnarsson is an Icelandic composer writing music based on irregular or non-pulse oriented rhythms.
└ from 22 — Anitation


It inhabits a world where grids or straight lines are almost non-existent.
└ from 22 — Anitation


Silence has a kinetic role in social exchanges: Quietude, reflective pauses, withdrawal, displays of consent or dissent, reception and interpretation.
└ from 23 — Silence


Is there a positive notation for this critical issue of performance, of silence in the voice, other than merely the courtesies of extended rests, or blanks in the score?
└ from 23 — Silence


A few examples appeal to the imagination with regard to how a score can be understood and which elements and/or processes can play a role in this.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


The AEX index, outsourcing of labour or copyright processes and social questions and implications around these issues form the fundament of some of his compositions.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


This takes shape by building digital interfaces; instrumentation used to explore, amplify and reflect what is barely visible, tangible or audible, while expressing the resonance and relationship between people, plants and organic matter.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


These spiders have laid out scores in the form of webs that are barely visible ephemera drifting between branches or street signs or windows and I long to understand them.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


The composition follows a more or less linear path, starting with 'deep' time.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It can be a slurry, it may contain chemicals or poisonous materials so you have to contain it and treat and store it properly.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The composition follows a more or less linear path – starting with deep time.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It's not like wind or the sun, which give you immediate energy.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It’s millions of years compressed into hard materials that are burned up, like coal, or painstakingly refined to yield useful metal.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


This ungraspable void of deep time fascinates me: The time compressed in iron ore, the coal that started billions of years ago as organic material, the gold flecked asteroid far away in space, or the more recent 'slambanken' in Kirkenes – a manmade landscape of unusable slag that might be mined in the future .
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


We trace out all the veins of the earth, and yet, living upon it, undermined as it is beneath our feet, are astonished that it should occasionally cleave asunder or tremble: As though, forsooth, these signs could be any other than expressions of the indignation felt by our sacred parent!
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


We were living quite close to the railway, so when the train did not run we knew instantaneously that something had happened, either in the mine or in the mill.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


He has a particular interest in the abstruse technological condition we are living in and the insufficient intellectual methodologies that seek to justify, or explain it.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


The idea is that this material will be embodied by a dynamic, accessible and therefore active archive, which creates new relations, new perspectives and, at its best, new concepts for the production and/or processes of making scores.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


Black MIDI' is a music genre consisting of compositions that use MIDI files to create song remixes containing a large number of notes, typically in the thousands or millions, and sometimes billions.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


DE PLAYER has always had a strong interest in emancipating publishing from its stereotypical understanding as merely making things public – an understanding that comes from an historical and economic media constraint linked to the print, software, music and film industries, and that has limited any form of meaningful, explorative, complementary or conflictual combinations between media in the field of cultural production.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The term 'black MIDI' is derived from how there are so many notes in each piece that the score would look nearly black (or would look really black) when transposed to the form of traditional sheet music.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The sound of 'Spectral Arrows' becomes a monumental aural sculpture, filling the space, not with steel or concrete, but with vibrations travelling through air.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


His overall aesthetic project combines allegorical appropriation with an interest in the intensity of a gesture or event.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Serial in form, each work uses an existing cultural document – a twentieth or twenty-first century avant-garde music score – as the formal, material and conceptual basis for a set of actions or interventions.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Fusinato's intervention into the scores therefore visualises and proposes the possibility of a dialectical energy running through the original work that has a political dimension as much as an artistic one – a relentless propensity to both destruction and expressive creation in the single action, or, in this case, to the production of noise.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


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