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Sentences that have music in common :


Can the 'detuning' of music generate new ways of thinking about the relation between sound and scripture?
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


The notation of sound has a long and varied history, from Gregorian chants conducted following signs written in the air, to the standard notation of the Western music we know today and the possibilities offered by new computer technologies.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


The first stop is at Pinkie Bowtie, Antwerp, where we will introduce the entity of TGC#3 as the an unknown music magazine that it is, while pointing out its specific features by demonstrating the floppy works that already reside in the collection.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


The complete selection of scores is published in a music book.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


The entire music book will be performed three times during the South Explorer weekend.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


What are the possibilities of the graphic score in a day and age in which graphic notation is still commonly seen as 'drawing', merely serving as some kind of sheet music?
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Throughout 2016, 2017 and 2018, this project will research the phenomenon of notation and the graphic representation of music.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Later on, this developed into the type of musical notation we are familiar with in Western music.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


In the early- to mid-twentieth century, the abstract developments in the visual arts played a vital role in fostering new approaches to the question of music notation and contemporary avant-garde music.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Pushing Scores' is a project researching graphic notation, based on a desire to update this form of music and sound notation for the twenty-first century.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Starting from the motto ‘From Cage to JODI and beyond’, and from the avant-garde music and sound art of the twentieth century, the project researches new audio-visual languages, media and functions of graphic notation in a contemporary context characterised by a fundamental transformation of sound culture and visual culture.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


What are the possibilities of the graphic score, in a day and age in which graphic notation is still commonly seen as 'drawing', merely serving as some kind of sheet music?
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Based on our compilation of the most contemporary and innovative graphic notation practices in the fields of music, sound art, performance art, e-culture, new-media art, graphic design and media design, we will introduce artists and designers from various creative disciplines to a national and international audience, with the goal of collectively developing new forms of graphic notation.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


The incentive for this project is the belief that graphic notation in twentieth-century avant-garde music and sound art constitutes an important, still radically innovative but wrongfully marginalised form, which can play a key role in the development of new audiovisual languages and media.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Can the 'detuning' of music generate new ways of thinking about the relation between sound and scripture?
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


The notation of sound has a long and varied history, from Gregorian chants conducted following signs written in the air, to the standard notation of the Western music we know today and the possibilities offered by new computer technologies.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Within it, he develops the reciprocity of music and architecture, and of sound and image.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Nevertheless, we finally fine-tuned concepts and decided not produce recordings but to embed the concept of 'Principium' into a two-in-one record and a music tool.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Colson then asked some artist to make reinterpretations of the works and from here the idea to use them as a music score originated.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


You know, the music on the record came from a performance I did, based on a concept I came up with.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


What are the possibilities of graphic scores, in a day and age in which graphic notation is still commonly seen as a 'drawing', merely serving as some kind of sheet music?
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Based on our compilation of the most contemporary and innovative graphic notation practices in the fields of music, sound art, performance art, e-culture, new-media art, graphic design and media design, we will introduce artists and designers from various creative disciplines to a national and international audience, with the goal of collectively developing new forms of graphic notation.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Afterwards, she mixes them together for yielding imprudently driving, rhythmic soundscapes followed by white noise and multiple fragments of music along with dirty boom beats.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


DEREK HOLZER (US) Derek Holzer is an American instrument builder and sound artist based in Helsinki and Berlin, whose current interests include DIY analogue electronics, the relationship between sound and space, media archaeology and the meeting points of electroacoustic, noise, improvisation and extreme music.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The usual code of the record, as defined by the music industry, was broken in all works.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


We decided to envision the framework for the installation as a three-dimensional staff to write down music.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


Bergmark is the ultimate rethinker of what music can be, in sound and in performance, evidenced by the fact that you can sometimes find him hanging on two piano strings from a ceiling.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


As another example, Max Franklin's research focuses on the fragile nature of improvisation in music, with software.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Through research into the act of improvisation in music, Max investigates ideas about liberation and resistance present in improvisation; both in artistic practices, and their broader application as a critical methodology of research and exploration.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


What are the possibilities of graphic scores, in a day and age in which graphic notation is still usually seen as a 'drawing', merely serving as some kind of sheet music?
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


In reaction to the dematerialisation of music (the general disappearance of music released in its physical form), the artists of the ARTKILLART label roster refocus their releases as material objects.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


The well-known 'Do-Re-Mi' and the solfège, a teaching method in music for learning pitch and the singing of sheet music, was developed from this.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


In the eleventh century, the Italian music theorist Guido of Arezzo developed an ascending scale consisting of six-notes: ut, re, mi, fa, sol and la.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


This scale is the basis for 'Do-Re-Mi' and solfège, a music education method used to teach the singing of Western music.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


Before music was established in writing, each choir leader led the Gregorian chants of the 'scola cantorum' with movements.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


This so-called 'manual notation' was of great importance to ensure the reproducibility of the various rhythmic possibilities in the developing polyphonic music of Western Europe.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


It was particularly of interested to us because of the way in which he focuses on the reproduction of music.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


Attali believes that music has gone through four specific cultural stages throughout its history: 1.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


It refers to the era of printed music (1500–1900).
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


This notation of music can be considered as a highly coded written guideline for how music should sound.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


This represents the music in the absence of the maker, and in the presence of an audience an effort must be made to read and articulate the intensity of the composer of the magazine.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


The third stage deals with the mechanical reproduction of music and the fourth stage could be considered as already referring to the idea of sampling, although it was only first published in translation by the University of Minnesota in 1985.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


Because of this ambiguity, we are interested in what this stage of music could represent.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


What kind of scores can be made with the myriad of new techniques and media that have been developed since Attali's writing, and which are definitely influential on our conceptual thinking of music and its reproduction.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


The argument of 'Noise' is that music, unique among the arts for reasons that are themselves overdetermined, has precisely this annunciatory vocation; that the music of today stands both as a promise of a new, liberating mode of production, and as the menace of a dystopian possibility – which stands as that mode of production's baleful mirror image.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


We knew that Remco had written an essay called 'Musical Theories in Graphic Design' – on the subject of graphic notation within a broader field of theory formation in contemporary music – and felt it would be a good match to work together on a research project about the graphic score.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


His clients include artists like Navid Nuur, Jonas Staal, Justin Bennett, Esther Tielemans, Gert-Jan Prins and Erik van Lieshout, alongside institutions like Witte de With, e-flux, New World Summit, Extra City Kunsthal, Arts Writers Grant Program, Art Agenda, Council, Cobra Museum and STEIM: studio for electro-instrumental music.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


In his 2002 essay 'Musical Theories in Graphic Design', Bladel discussed the subject of graphic notation within a broader field of theory formation in contemporary music.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


The most important, from his youth, is sound or music.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


Sound in relation to image remains an elusive phenomenon that continues to fascinate him because sound/music is the most abstract art form.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


We became familiar with the work of Derek Holzer through his project on tonewheels – an experiment in converting graphical imagery to sound, inspired by some of the pioneering twentieth century electronic music inventions.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


But this unwanted presence also guarantees the vitality of that fiercely fought area – the live electronic music performance.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


John Cage once quipped that Serge Tcherepnin's synthesizer system was 'the best musical composition that Serge had ever made', and it is precisely Cage's reformulation of the concert score from a list of deterministic note values to a set of indeterminable possibilities that allowed the blurring of lines between instrument-builder and music composer that followed.
└ from 15 — Schematic as Design


In the early 1960s, the composer Morton Subotnik employed engineer Don Buchla to help him create 'the music of the future'.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


And by the early 1970s, an interest in cybernetics, systems theory and automatic processes brought the analog computer closer to the worlds of art, music and architecture.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


Before music was established in writing, each choir leader led the Gregorian chants of the 'scola cantorum' with movements.
└ from 18 — Dirigeerstok


In a multicultural situation, abstract sounds are forms of recognition; then there is, for example, music.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


Subcultures form through music.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


In addition to the all-dominating impact of the music industry, which determines lifestyle at the level of confection, all sorts of de-mass-splintering genres are forming on the periphery of the musical firmament.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


The connection between the word and sound can be found in many ways in the art and music of the Fluxus movement, rap, the early avant-garde, soundproofing, laut poetry, musical theater, opera, performative series, radio plays and installation settings.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


They are a group that plays music in an 'extra-musical' or 'non-musical' sort of rhythm (so to speak).
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


Through his compositions he has developed a rhythmic language devoid of regular beat or metre, and he has created a new musical notation to represent his music.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


It results in very delicate and unconventional chamber music.
└ from 22 — Anitation


Guðmundur Steinn Gunnarsson is an Icelandic composer writing music based on irregular or non-pulse oriented rhythms.
└ from 22 — Anitation


This often requires presenting the music as moving graphics on computer screens.
└ from 22 — Anitation


His music has been performed by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, the Iceland Symphony Orchestra, Caput Ensemble, Reykjavík Chamber Orchestra, Ensemble Adapter, Tøyen Fil og Klafferi, Ensemble l’Arsenale, Ensemble CRUSH, Aksiom Ensemble, Nordic Affect, Defun Ensemble, Iceland Flute Choir, Duo Harpverk, Roberto Durante, Markus Hohti, Mathias Ziegler, Georgia Browne, Timo Kinnunen, Shayna Dunkelmann, Una Sveinbjarnardóttir and Tinna Þosteinsdóttir.
└ from 22 — Anitation


Some of the festivals that have included Guðmundur’s music are Tectonics Festival (both Reykjavík and Glasgow), MATA, Musikin Aika, Ultima, November Music, Transit, Music for People and Thingamajigs, Nordlichter Biennale, Timisoara International Music Festival and the Irish Sound, Science and Technology Convocation in 2014, where Guðmundur was also keynote speaker.
└ from 22 — Anitation


In the context of an experimental music notation, seeking to make an instrumental gesture of silence, how can we draw incipience?
└ from 23 — Silence


I think silence has that same relation with music.
└ from 23 — Silence


His work is described as conceptual music.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


From 2000 to 2006 Kreidler studied composition with Mathias Spahlinger, electronic music with Orm Finnendahl and Mesias Maiguashca and music theory with Eckehard Kiem at the University of Music Freiburg and at the Institute of Sonology (Computer Music) of the Koninklijk Conservatorium, the Hague.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


He works as a lecturer in music theory, ear training and electronic music at the Rostock Academy of Music and Theater, the Detmold Academy of Music, the Hanover University of Music and Drama and the Hamburg University of Music and Drama.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


His work/action 'Product Placements', which helped to discuss copyright and the level of creation in music, was widely spread.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


The music production facility is consciously located in a legal grey area, which has been greatly enlarged by digital technologies.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


If such a fraction can still be labelled as music, it can still be linked to the original and the performing artist in terms of financial compensation for use.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


For another work he commissioned composers from low-wage countries to plagiarise his own music for a commission for the Festival Klangwerkstatt in Berlin.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


We asked Johannes to do a reading about his practice as a composer during the event we organised around music and capitalism.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In September 2008 a piece of press advertised his action ‘Product Placements’, with which he wanted to initiate a discussion on copyright and the height of creation in music.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In a thirty-three second piece of music, he processed 70,200 quotes of foreign works, proceeding to individually enrolled each one at the GEMA.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


An ensemble of Arduino-powered prepared record players is built as an instrumentation to play an intimate selection from a family archive of popular music, 'A set of records carefully shipped home from a country at war forty years ago.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


She passes on the notation she distils from this to music companies in order to come to performances.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


The idea of a graphic score, a readable gesture, aids in the playability/repeatability of a piece of music that through its repetition allows for exploration, interpretation and imagination.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


In addition, it places itself in the tradition of electro acoustic music and 'musique concrète' – a French music movement that makes use of everyday sounds that are processed with the help of electronics into compositions and sound collages.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


He is known primarily for his writings on the use of sound in the avant-garde and experimental arts and music, and history and theory of the media arts.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


For me it relates directly to iron ore in so far that the type of musique concrète and tape music developed at GRM was made possible by magnetic tape.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


John Duncan has been active for decades at the cutting edge of performances, video, experimental music, installation, pirate radio and television.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


He has played a central role in the development of performing arts in Los Angeles, experimental music as a member of LAFMS, Japanese noise and pirate radio in Tokyo.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


Duncan's work has a lasting influence on experimental music because his art is generally still refined and refined, and he regularly collaborates with young artists.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


His music consists mainly of recordings of shortwave radio, field recordings and voice.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


We know Varia as a community based initiative which combines several knowledge bases in the interdisciplinary filed of music, programming, publishing, hacking, social interventions and critical positions, among others.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


It is based on a new notation system designed to help conceptual composers develop and exchange conceptual music in one uniform language.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


Black MIDI' is a music genre consisting of compositions that use MIDI files to create song remixes containing a large number of notes, typically in the thousands or millions, and sometimes billions.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


DE PLAYER has always had a strong interest in emancipating publishing from its stereotypical understanding as merely making things public – an understanding that comes from an historical and economic media constraint linked to the print, software, music and film industries, and that has limited any form of meaningful, explorative, complementary or conflictual combinations between media in the field of cultural production.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


In its beginning years, black MIDIs were represented visually with traditional two-stave piano sheet music, and contained a number of notes only in the thousands.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


While black MIDIs of Japanese video game music and anime are still common, the genre has also begun spilling into modern-day pop songs, such as 'Wrecking Ball' by Miley Cyrus.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The term 'black MIDI' is derived from how there are so many notes in each piece that the score would look nearly black (or would look really black) when transposed to the form of traditional sheet music.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The Guide to Black MIDI', however, denies this influence, stating that, 'We believe that references to Conlon Nancarrow and piano rolls are too deep and black MIDI origins must be found in digital MIDI music world.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


It has garnered acclaim from journalists, bloggers and electronic musicians, with many noting it as a distinctive and engaging genre thanks to how regular piano notes are combined to make new, abstract sounds not heard in many styles of music, as well as the visuals representing the notes.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


As a musician, Fusinato explores the notion of noise as music, using the electric guitar and associated electronics to improvise intricate, wide-ranging and physically affecting frequencies.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Serial in form, each work uses an existing cultural document – a twentieth or twenty-first century avant-garde music score – as the formal, material and conceptual basis for a set of actions or interventions.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


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