[x] mining ▶

Sentences that have mining in common :


From the 'Dark Ecology' project of Sonic Acts, Amsterdam, BJ Nilsen has visited many mines and mining areas over time.
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As a sound artist he realised how much sound there is in the mining industry and began to think in sonic terms about its impact and meaning.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


What is the relationship between the sounds of mining and the community that surrounds them?
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Where does mining stop?
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In it he found the fragility of mining processes and the impact that mining activities have on the population and their biotope.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In the final processing of the sound, he uses the facets of mining as different sound tracks.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


For example, mining is in the arctic zone, and an asteroid mining law was adopted in Luxembourg in 2017 that gives companies ownership of what they extract from celestial bodies.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It doesn't relate directly to mining, but it extends the project to include geology, deep time and stone.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The recordings I did in the former mining region of the Netherlands are again more environmental: The mine near Heerlen has been developed into a park and nature area.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


That's why I wanted to have a thread about the regeneration of mining areas.
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I think it is important to explore the changes that the surrounding landscape and the mining site itself are undergoing, from active to closed, from contaminated landscape to re-vegetation.
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This mining work is tied directly to the computer age, itself an alchemic expression of man's ingenious use of the earth.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Source: http://www.newcriticals.com/deep-mining-deep-time/page-3 Mineral commodities used in mobile devices: Gallium (from bauxite), Germanium (from sphalerite) Graphite Indium (from sphalerite) Lithium (from amblygonite, petalite, lepidolite and spodumene) Platinum Potassium (from langbeinite, sylvite and sylvinite) Rare-earth elements (like bastnäsite, loparite, monazite and xenotime) Sand Silicon (from quartz) Silver (from argentite and tetrahedrite) Tantalum (from columbite and tantalite) Tin (from cassiterite) Tungsten (from scheelite and wolframite) Source: https://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/0167/gip167.pdf Chemical structure of the products of Sydvaranger mine, Kirkenes: Fe – 68% SiO2 – 5.00 Al2O3 – 0.30 S – 0.08 P – 0.01 Mn – 0.05 Na2O – 0.01 K2O – 0.03 CaO – 0.35 MgO – 0.45 H2O – 8.00 Size of the product: Over 0.15mm – less than 0.2% 0.053mm–0.15mm – less than 20% Under 0.053mm – up to 80% Source: http://sydvarangergruve.no/produkt 'In mining there are two types of waste.
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You cannot talk about mining in the North without getting into the question of what it means for the landscape, for the people and the animals living there, for the communities and the relations between all these.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In a sense, you cannot not bring out those relations: How a society depends on mining and how it affects it .
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Except for the mining, but that then is also why I find mining in the Arctic especially interesting.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


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