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The first stop is at Pinkie Bowtie, Antwerp, where we will introduce the entity of TGC#3 as the an unknown music magazine that it is, while pointing out its specific features by demonstrating the floppy works that already reside in the collection.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Our ambition, and that of our collaborating partners, is to emancipate graphic notation from the confines of the modernist tradition, in such a way that it may remain an innovative and provocative medium for decades to come.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Some dare to say that it’s a kind of jukebox.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


‘Fred Flintstone meets the twenty-first century’, it was referred to as.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


It’s not a matter of an event between spectators and a musician– it’s a space to submit to a process.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Within it, he develops the reciprocity of music and architecture, and of sound and image.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


I already knew the work of Charlemagne and we had also met during earlier events, so it was instantly clear that we could do something together that would make sense for the exhibition and ourselves.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


The ink was absorbed by the books and, after drying, it turned out to be a series of morphing colours that shifted with each page turn.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Each run of ninty-nine copies (the maximum run of the machine) was printed on transparent foil and is now accompanied by a foil cover with the dub-cut audio file in it.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Because his work is pretty conceptual, you could say that there is always a strategy (call it a score) that operates as a framework underpinning his artistic output.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


We had previously worked with Kris Delacourt on 'Principium 2.0', which is a reinterpretation of Colson’s work 'Principium', and so it was a natural progression that we then asked Colson to work on a sound publication with us.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


For it, Kris Delacourt (Remörk) had made a modified Casio keyboard as a reinterpretation of Vaast Colson's work 'Principium'.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


We showed this piece by Remörk at ART Rotterdam and then I asked Kris if he was willing to make a publication of it, meaning a record.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


He was intrigued by the invitation, but it took a long time to develop.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


This was quite a process but it eventually resulted in a beautiful limited edition of twelve pieces, developed and designed in collaboration between Kris and the team of DE PLAYER.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Pretty nonsensical in a way, but it produced a really beautiful, and quite fragile, result.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


He reduced the number of keys to twelve, and added a magnetic sequencer board to it.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Short version: First it was a one octave Casio keyboard, then it became twelve 10" records, then it became an eight hour performance and eventually now a 12" LP.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: Well actually, it started out as an artwork, or rather a series of artworks.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's all pretty nonsensical in a way I guess, especially if you try to put something like that into words, but it’s also really beautiful, and quite fragile.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And at a certain point he posed something like: 'I've made some work that might be interesting to use as a score, would you be up for it?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The funny thing was that he thought his resulting collages would be nice to use as scores – and they probably would be – but it's just that I was so intrigued by the leftover sticker sheets, with their eight by twelve grid that just screamed 'SEQUENCER!
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I reduced the number of keys to twelve, and added a magnetic sequencer board to it.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's an iron board and it has the same visuals as the sticker sheets.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I was really happy with the results, and especially with the fact that it's so inviting towards an audience.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It looks like a game of Four In A Row, totally appealing to get your hands on it.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And I never gave it that much thought, but the fact that when you stick magnets somewhere it makes a musical phrase, well, I guess to some people that would be wizardry, hah.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And I really like it when people are enthusiastic, so I said yes, obviously.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The idea of just me making a record totally ignores that, and to me it turns it into something really static and rigid.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Yet I felt like making another interpretation of an existing piece, instead of merely documenting it.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And since all the records have different lengths, it ended up being one long shifting overlapping piece.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Funny thing was that we’d agreed to let it run until 23:00, and at about two minutes to then I got the first ever instruction to leave all the turntables empty.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: Is this LP the final version of this project, or do you see it evolving into future iterations?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: Oh, I think it's definitely something that's still evolving.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


So I don’t think I've quite finished with it, no.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Was one of your fears that, by making it into a 12", you would have to bring this project to a final version?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Also because I really am convinced that this is just one more step towards something that can keep going, that it doesn't have to be final.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I know it's not a final version, but it is a version nonetheless, and I want all versions to be of a certain quality.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I thought it worked really well as a performance, but I wanted to make sure it was good enough to be a record.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: You do it in short sessions, hah.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And so on, until you really narrow it down.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Of course, because the basic tempo is the same, it would have been relatively easy to start editing, splicing things together.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


If something was interesting for a while, but didn't stay interesting, it had to go.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: Do you think that, by bringing it back to an LP, you're making it easier for the listener?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But I'm not sure if it is at all possible to listen with concentration to eight hours of something like this.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It was continually shifting, so it didn't really have a beginning or an end – you could drop in any time you liked.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But it was pretty intense, so yes, this record is probably the light version.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Still, not sure if it is easy listening at all, although I think it has a beauty of it's own.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: Weren't you afraid at some point that this whole idea would grow over your head, that it would become too complicated, too smart, too conceptual?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But I really needed a break from thinking it over and to just do something... Plus, it adds a much needed layer of spontaneity that works beautifully, not in the least musically, so no regrets.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I like working with concepts a lot, as a starting point, but I'm also interested enough in the results to loosen up the concept if I feel it's needed.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


That's also purely pragmatic: Now they've all been sold, it's going to be very difficult to get all twelve of them together again for a second performance.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Of course, taking what is essentially a medium for reproducing and turning it into something of an instrument in it's own right again, that's nothing new – think hip hop, turntablism, even things like the Mellotron did that.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But it's still a relevant idea to me, this kind of creative misuse.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: I do look at it as a solo thing.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Now, I never would have though it up if it weren't for Vaast's initial invitation, or for Peter asking me to do a record, or Dennis wanting to present it in Antwerp.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's a result of that whole chain reaction, so in that way it's definitely the result of collaborating with all those people.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But Vaast, for instance, refuses to regard it as his doing.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


That's awesome, and I'm flattered to be a part of that, but in a way it's also what record labels are supposed to be doing, no?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


We worked on the packaging together, and it looks amazing because of them.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But musically, I still feel it’s my work.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And the same goes for this record on Ultra Eczema: I have to say I'm really happy we finally got an Ultra Eczema release together, it's something Dennis had been asking for for quite some time... He’d actually given up asking.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But now with this thing it just seemed to fall into place perfectly.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Art is letting things go, let it flow.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And sometimes, by sticking to it, you end up with the most unexpected results – adhering to rules you impose on yourself makes you do stuff you would never have decided for yourself.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Does it feel like that for you too: As your first 'real' album, as a statement?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: I think I would consider that series of twelve 10" my vinyl debut, but maybe because it was twelve different records or in 10" format it doesn't really count?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I don't think of it as a manifesto or anything.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's a document of what I'm happy to be working on at the moment, and hopefully it's something that others can enjoy as well.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And even though it has strong rhythmic patterns, the underlying harmonies and atmosphere shift quite slowly.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: Do you think this LP would also be enjoyable if someone would listen to it without knowing a single thing about the whole concept behind it?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Or perhaps you would perceive it as a failure if it weren't enjoyable without the concept?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: I certainly do hope that it's enjoyable.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Like I said, I know it's not easy listening per se, and some might probably find it boring at first try, with the tempo being the same for the whole record and all.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Until I tried it.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Rather, it is an exploration of a once-current and now discarded technology linked with specific utopias and dystopias from another time.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


They approach DE PLAYER for some input surrounding the production and distribution of it, and because of the direct relation between sound and image, and the new interface an object like that represents, it was a clear match of interests.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


We eventually asked Derek Holzer because of his work with tonewheels, but it was not logistically possible to facilitate this type of performance.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In his article 'New Plasticism in Music: Possibilities of the Gramophone', László Moholy-Nagy said that it lies in the peculiarity of human nature that: The abuse and misunderstanding [of the record form] are necessary to gain results.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


For this year's festival, it was clear to us that we should present the 'Pushing Scores' project.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


HIELE MARTENS (BE) Sometimes 1 + 1 is greater than the sum of its parts, but if you put two of Belgium's finest composers and musicians together, it adds up to an infinite number.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Jakobson has great reverence for intuition and it's use as a technology within her work.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


However, it was decided to start from the floppy disc as a medium.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The local WiFi station makes it possible to access all projects (on floppy disk) by receiving these projects via a mobile phone or on the computer.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Whether it is about recording movements for archiving, or writing new choreographies for the future, she concentrated on which elements of dance are overwritable (such as direction or footwork) and which are not.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


After learning of Attali's book, 'Noise: The Political Economy of Music', we used it as inspiration for the project 'Pushing Scores'.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


He calls this chapter 'Represent' because it is the project of the executive.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


The third stage deals with the mechanical reproduction of music and the fourth stage could be considered as already referring to the idea of sampling, although it was only first published in translation by the University of Minnesota in 1985.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


At the time of writing it would have been quite prophetic.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


We knew that Remco had written an essay called 'Musical Theories in Graphic Design' – on the subject of graphic notation within a broader field of theory formation in contemporary music – and felt it would be a good match to work together on a research project about the graphic score.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


In it he transposed compositional methodologies of the avant-gardists in the twentieth century to graphic design methodologies, for instance, by understanding Steve Reich's phase shifting technique through the lens of design.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


He sees it as punk, experimental, noise, investigative and critical, searching for dissonance and ordering of information, for rhythm and tonality.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


The subjective nature, the way in which vibrations can release such strong emotions, makes it possible to deal speculatively and to use them for use in typography, image, material choices, folding methods and bookbinding systems.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


In it he considers it axiomatic that, for every work of art that must be considered experimental, the possibility of failure must be built into its process.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


John Cage once quipped that Serge Tcherepnin's synthesizer system was 'the best musical composition that Serge had ever made', and it is precisely Cage's reformulation of the concert score from a list of deterministic note values to a set of indeterminable possibilities that allowed the blurring of lines between instrument-builder and music composer that followed.
└ from 15 — Schematic as Design


Rather, it is an exploration of a once-current and now discarded technology linked with specific utopias and dystopias from another time.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


This object is chosen to be part of the archive because it is the first and most simple tool to translate a written score to the musician who has to execute it.
└ from 18 — Dirigeerstok


Listening in the sense of 'Radical Listening' is therefore not only about ears specifically, but generally about exploring our world, our position in it and the way in which communication is possible.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


Here it has played an important role and as such it is still current.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


They did quite an impressive set a number of years ago at both De Vleeshal and Wall Gallery, for those who missed it.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


They had been performing before we started the 'Pushing Scores' project, yet we nevertheless claim their work to be part of it.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


Johannes Kreidler is a special case when it comes to composing.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


If such a fraction can still be labelled as music, it can still be linked to the original and the performing artist in terms of financial compensation for use.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


This makes it particularly interesting when viewed from the perspective of experimentation and unorthodox composing.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


The plant is deliberately located in a legal gray area, which has been greatly enlarged by digital technologies, so that it is impossible to clarify the case so far.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In Japan there's a focus on the lure of the spider, where it is sometimes likened to a prostitute.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


A spider web is not only an illustration of a spider's mental landscape, but an instrument it plucks and plays.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


We had an appointment and it was immediately clear that this project was of interest to us and we decided to present her prototype at an event in which other inventive ways of sound making were presented.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


In addition, it places itself in the tradition of electro acoustic music and 'musique concrète' – a French music movement that makes use of everyday sounds that are processed with the help of electronics into compositions and sound collages.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


How much influence does it have on a community?
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In it he found the fragility of mining processes and the impact that mining activities have on the population and their biotope.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Of course, it only becomes interesting when the resources on earth are exhausted.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


When it was empty, I mapped out the building by recording it.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It doesn't relate directly to mining, but it extends the project to include geology, deep time and stone.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


I also went to Näätämö/Neiden and just over the border to Finland because it’s land of the Sámi, and I wanted to have that in.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


I also worked with stone as an instrument, striking and recording it.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


I think it is important to explore the changes that the surrounding landscape and the mining site itself are undergoing, from active to closed, from contaminated landscape to re-vegetation.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It can be a slurry, it may contain chemicals or poisonous materials so you have to contain it and treat and store it properly.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The work creates a third space that belongs to the individual listener and which arises from the interaction between the original space and imaginary space, created through the composition and sound processing… We dig deep into the earth to get to layers of deep time, extract it and use the ancient material, in the case of coal, for electricity, for heating the house, commodities, to type a message on a phone.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It's absurd when you start to think about it.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


So much time is compressed in this material and it's burned up in minutes.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


We trace out all the veins of the earth, and yet, living upon it, undermined as it is beneath our feet, are astonished that it should occasionally cleave asunder or tremble: As though, forsooth, these signs could be any other than expressions of the indignation felt by our sacred parent!
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


You cannot talk about mining in the North without getting into the question of what it means for the landscape, for the people and the animals living there, for the communities and the relations between all these.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In a sense, you cannot not bring out those relations: How a society depends on mining and how it affects it .
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It created a vacuum after it closed.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The landscape is fairly untouched, it is scarcely populated, it's desolate.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


If you work against it, it will kill you.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The people in the Arctic have a lot of respect for nature, it forms them .
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


If it goes on like it goes now, the ice will open up and it will not be so desolate anymore.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Will it mean that other places will become desolate instead, uninhabitable?
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Workers hear the rock talk, it crackles, it makes sounds, spits slivers.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Geologists read the stone, but they also listen to it.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


By physically interacting with the stone you can determine what material it is.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In practice it's quite mathematical, but it still it is part of the sound world too.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


For me it relates directly to iron ore in so far that the type of musique concrète and tape music developed at GRM was made possible by magnetic tape.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Each signal was chosen for the resonance it evokes in the listener, later interwoven with other signals recorded from the same source for several days.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


The fact that the sound on the record is an ever-changing piece – because of the psycho acoustic effects – transposes it more into a tool than a static recording.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


He has a particular interest in the abstruse technological condition we are living in and the insufficient intellectual methodologies that seek to justify, or explain it.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


We already knew some of its members and thought it would be nice and effective to approach them with a question of doing something with the archive of 'Pushing Scores'.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


Instead of making a paintwork publication, we wanted it to be more adventurous and in line with the concept of the project.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


The UNI was developed by Niek Hilkmann and Joseph Knierzinger, and it is a machine into which a coin is inserted and from which a printed score is then delivered.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


It has garnered acclaim from journalists, bloggers and electronic musicians, with many noting it as a distinctive and engaging genre thanks to how regular piano notes are combined to make new, abstract sounds not heard in many styles of music, as well as the visuals representing the notes.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


In 'Spectral Arrows', Fusinato arrives at the venue when it opens for business, sets up his equipment facing a wall and proceeds to play for the whole day until the end of business hours.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Even for those who stick it out, the extended duration, like in the late works of Morton Feldman, destroys the listener's ability to retain and assess the structure of the performance.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


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