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Thu 17 Mar 2016 19:00 @ Witte de With, Rotterdam 'TUNING – DETUNING/NOTING – DENOTING' WITH YANN GOURDON, RAFAËL ROZENDAAL, FLORIS VAN HOOF, JUSTIN BENNETT, REMCO VAN BLADEL AND OTHERS Moving back and forth between sound and scripture, this evening consists of experimental performances and short lectures, with a special focus on the visual sound renderings Charlemagne Palestine included in his exhibition 'GesammttkkunnsttMeshuggahhLaandtttt' at Witte de With Center for Contempory Art, Rotterdam.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


In his lecture, Douglas Kahn discards old categories of sound and performance and replaces them with a new category of ‘energy’, which operates within the bigger narratives of ecology and other sensitivities.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Moving back and forth between sound and scripture, this evening consists of experimental performances and short lectures, with a special focus on the visual sound renderings Charlemagne Palestine included in his exhibition ‘GesammttkkunnsttMeshuggahhLaandtttt’ at Witte de With Center for Contempory Art, Rotterdam.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Every aspect of his work deals with the quality of sound.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


RAFAËL ROZENDAAL (NL) Rafaël Rozendaal is a visual artist who uses the Internet as his canvas.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Connecting his many worlds, ideas and influences into highly personal live performances and recordings, he keeps on amazing people both here and abroad.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


For this event he will work with a film projection and a synthesizer, which he influences with his brainwaves.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


At every level of detail, the everyday sound of our urban surroundings is the focus of his work.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Rafaël Rozendaal showed his web work 'Slow Empty', which functioned as real-time clockwork for the event.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Floris Vanhoof played a set during which he used his brainwaves to influence his synthesizer sounds, combining this with a projection and a laserbeam.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Justin Bennet showed his project 'Shot Gun Architecture', and Remco van Bladel introduced our project 'Pushing Scores' by doing a reading about historical and contemporary graphic scores and the concepts behind them.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Because his work is pretty conceptual, you could say that there is always a strategy (call it a score) that operates as a framework underpinning his artistic output.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


From a spontaneous and rather naive approach to art and performance, Colson wants to shape his ideas.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


In his work, Colson constantly questions the relationship with the audience and is also strongly interested in mythology and the authentic (or not) mystique of the artist's existence, which he usually explores in his performances.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


The process is always important, but the end result, which is variable for Colson and influenced by the context, is an important part of his work.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Vaast Colson asked Remörk to reinterpret his work 'Principium', which was a joyful (but strictly ruled) play with sticky coloured dots.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Interestingly, he thought his resulting collages would be nice to use as scores – and they probably would have been.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


This is an interview with Kris Delacourt (Remörk) on his practice and the 'Principium' story.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Anyway, Vaast was putting together a show where other people would do reinterpretations of some of his works, and around the same time we had a nice chat about alternative musical scores, graphic scores and what not.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The funny thing was that he thought his resulting collages would be nice to use as scores – and they probably would be – but it's just that I was so intrigued by the leftover sticker sheets, with their eight by twelve grid that just screamed 'SEQUENCER!
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


So we discussed other possibilities, like capturing a live performance, or possibly even cutting records on the fly with his vinyl lathe.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But Vaast, for instance, refuses to regard it as his doing.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


He always stressed, right from the start, that any interpretation I gave of his work was no longer his work.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


We eventually asked Derek Holzer because of his work with tonewheels, but it was not logistically possible to facilitate this type of performance.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Instead, he came over to do a reading from his text 'Schematic as a Score' and did a live set of Tektronix Oscilloscope Music.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In contrast to the composer or musician who perceives the record first and foremost as a vehicle transporting his or her musical ideas, here the interest lies especially in the optical/sculptural, as well as the acoustic presence and the compression of an idea when working with the playback possibilities and impossibilities of recording techniques.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In his article 'New Plasticism in Music: Possibilities of the Gramophone', László Moholy-Nagy said that it lies in the peculiarity of human nature that: The abuse and misunderstanding [of the record form] are necessary to gain results.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Each student could design his/her own project on this medium.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


For TGC#3 he developed a tool that is a learning counterpart to his own musical input.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Remco van Bladel grew up in the record store of his father.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


The relation between the sound on the records and the visuals on the sleeves and packaging has a strong influence on his current practice, especially in relation to the strategy and concepts he creates for graphic design.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


In his 2002 essay 'Musical Theories in Graphic Design', Bladel discussed the subject of graphic notation within a broader field of theory formation in contemporary music.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


It was an investigation into methodologies within his own artistic practice.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


From his own position, he considers himself as (editorial) designer, curator, musician and publisher with a strong predilection for language and typography.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


His artistic practice is formed by a number of ingredients that have always been present in his work to a greater or lesser extent.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


The most important, from his youth, is sound or music.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


Both as a source or inspiration, as a metaphor, as a thinking model and as an 'attitude' in relation to his practice.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


This tactility, the application of materiality and the use of printing techniques as a metaphor for sound play a major role in his entire practice.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


We became familiar with the work of Derek Holzer through his project on tonewheels – an experiment in converting graphical imagery to sound, inspired by some of the pioneering twentieth century electronic music inventions.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


He came up with the idea to give a reading of his text 'Schematics as a Score', because that was a current issue of his practice.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


He did a reading of his text 'Schematic as a Score' alongside a live concert derived from his research on analogue visuals with the oscilloscope.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


One of the originators of 'participatory art', in which the artwork can only be experienced by the active involvement of the viewer, he is most famous for his 'Event Scores', such as 'Drip Music' (1962), and is widely seen as an important precursor to conceptual art.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


He described his own art as a way of 'ensuring that the details of everyday life, the random constellations of objects that surround us, stop going unnoticed.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


Steve Joy took me to meet George Brecht in his studio when I was in-residence at St Michael's in Manhattan in 1962.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


For his 'Vehicle Sundown Event', he published a set of about fifty cards to be given to participants who participated in the event with their vehicles.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


Of specific inspiration is the fact that his works are composed of simple instructions and can be performed by anybody, giving them a highly democratic factor without losing their artistic impact.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


The way in which he arrives at his poetry is very closely linked to his knowledge and skills of the programming language.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


For example, his work 'frakativ' is an electronic visual sound poetry performance.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


Jörg Piringer has performed his visual sound poetry pieces, based on computer programming, at DE PLAYER in the past.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


Through his compositions he has developed a rhythmic language devoid of regular beat or metre, and he has created a new musical notation to represent his music.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


This approach has led to the development of his animated notation, or 'anitation', instead of using traditional musical scores.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


This rhythmic language and animated notation, and the structural methods he uses in composition, were the subject of his Master's thesis at Mills College.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


This technique of composing is performed by Guðmundur Steinn Gunnarsson and his quartet Fersteinn.
└ from 22 — Anitation


Guðmundur Steinn Gunnarsson has been part of DE PLAYER's programme with his quartet Fersteinn several times.
└ from 22 — Anitation


This Icelandic quartet plays with little analogue instruments and animation scores Gunnarsson made on his computer.
└ from 22 — Anitation


The animations of Gunnarsson were also used by Goodiepal when he visited DE PLAYER on 17 Dec 2015 with his project on Icelandic animated notation.
└ from 22 — Anitation


He runs his own multi-instrumentalist quartet called Fersteinn.
└ from 22 — Anitation


Before the song there was the yodel,' As Bart Plantenga stated in his reading on yodeling.
└ from 23 — Silence


By acting consistently within these structures he creates his works.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


This is close to his work ‘Charts Music’, in which he used the share prices of various companies to derive pitches.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


For another work he commissioned composers from low-wage countries to plagiarise his own music for a commission for the Festival Klangwerkstatt in Berlin.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


The AEX index, outsourcing of labour or copyright processes and social questions and implications around these issues form the fundament of some of his compositions.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


We asked Johannes to do a reading about his practice as a composer during the event we organised around music and capitalism.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Following this, we also produced a record with him, which contains one piece of his named 'Product Placements'.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In September 2008 a piece of press advertised his action ‘Product Placements’, with which he wanted to initiate a discussion on copyright and the height of creation in music.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


He also expanded his archive with all related logistic processes.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It made him realise how closely he was actually involved in the process of iron ore, and how his development as an artist was shaped thanks to iron ore.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Benny Nilsen approached us with his project 'ORE'.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


He is known primarily for his writings on the use of sound in the avant-garde and experimental arts and music, and history and theory of the media arts.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Pliny the Elder, 'Naturalis Historia, book XXXIII', p. 77, data.perseus.org/citations/urn:cts:latinLit:phi0978.phi001.perseus-eng1:33.1 'If, as Novalis and many of his friends believed, stones, metals and rock strata amount to transcriptions of the earth's history, what better place to study that history than in the mines and caverns of the earth, where the entire record is preserved and exposed?
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


His background in performance and his multimedia and confrontational approach gives him full credits to be part of the DE PLAYER programme.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


Duncan's work has a lasting influence on experimental music because his art is generally still refined and refined, and he regularly collaborates with young artists.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


Since the beginning of his practice, he has made extensive use of recorded sound.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


In the mid-1980s Duncan began pirate radio and television broadcasting with his own custom-built portable channels, operating illegally from the roofs of apartment buildings in central Tokyo and from an abandoned American military hospital near Sagamihara.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


He also made periodic broadcasts from his own home.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


During an evening at the Varia collective, where Valentia Vuksic and Ana Guedes also played a live set and explained their work and backgrounds, Niek Hilkmann, who is part of the Varia team, presented his Universal Notation Ideal (UNI) – a Pay2Print research into the simultaneous production and distribution of standardised graphic scores by means of an automatic machine.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


By emphasising this aspect of the machine as a musical entrepreneur earning his own income, the conditions of mechanised labour within the cultural industry, and its associated ethics, are investigated within this project.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


In 'Spectral Arrows', Fusinato arrives at the venue when it opens for business, sets up his equipment facing a wall and proceeds to play for the whole day until the end of business hours.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Fusinato presents himself here in the guise of a worker, clocking on and unceremoniously clocking off at the end of the day, refusing to allow the behind-the-scenes mystery of rehearsals and preparations to lend an aura to the performance, and affirming the deskilled ethos of his work.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


From this perspective, his live performances can also be considered as black mass implosions.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


As most of his work engages with highly political issues, we invited him to do a performance within the context of the event 'MUSIC & CAPITALISM'.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


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