[x] he ▶

Sentences that have he in common :


Connecting his many worlds, ideas and influences into highly personal live performances and recordings, he keeps on amazing people both here and abroad.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


For this event he will work with a film projection and a synthesizer, which he influences with his brainwaves.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Within it, he develops the reciprocity of music and architecture, and of sound and image.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Nevertheless, he showed me some books he once made in New York, which he said were to be seen as musical scores.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


They are cheap dummy books, onto which he poured ink in several colors.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Floris Vanhoof played a set during which he used his brainwaves to influence his synthesizer sounds, combining this with a projection and a laserbeam.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


This can be a performance, an object, a book or whatever other form he settles on.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Everything he undertakes can thus be considered as artistic intervention.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


In his work, Colson constantly questions the relationship with the audience and is also strongly interested in mythology and the authentic (or not) mystique of the artist's existence, which he usually explores in his performances.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


We showed this piece by Remörk at ART Rotterdam and then I asked Kris if he was willing to make a publication of it, meaning a record.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Interestingly, he thought his resulting collages would be nice to use as scores – and they probably would have been.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And so, he went on to design 'Principium 1.0'; a magnetic board with the same field as the sticker sheets, which he activated with magnets as a synthesizer.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


As Delacourt didn't just want to publish a record with recordings of the 'Principium 1.0', he decided to transpose the idea onto a prepared record player using magnets and a specific device.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The interview was conducted after he exhibited 'Principium 2.0' in an installation setting at Stadslimiet, Antwerp.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


He made these beautiful pieces where he used tiny paper sticker dots, you know the ones that most art galleries use to denote which works in a show have been sold?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


What he did was draw a bunch of random lines across the sticker sheets, and since there are eight by twelve stickers on a sheet you end up with stickers with tiny line segments drawn on them.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Line segments which he reassembled into new shapes and new lines.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And at a certain point he posed something like: 'I've made some work that might be interesting to use as a score, would you be up for it?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


So he showed me the two booklets he made for the 'Principium' series – reproductions of each used sticker sheet and the result.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The funny thing was that he thought his resulting collages would be nice to use as scores – and they probably would be – but it's just that I was so intrigued by the leftover sticker sheets, with their eight by twelve grid that just screamed 'SEQUENCER!
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The next step was when Peter Fengler of DEPLAYER/DOB Records said he wanted to do a record with the Casio version.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Now, Peter is a really nice guy and really clever with these things, and I guess he understood my doubts.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I think initially he wanted to do a tape.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: When Joseph Beuys was asked why he hated the term 'conceptual art', he said, 'Because a concept, an idea, is a starting point, not a final form.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Still, the Ultra Eczema one is definitely the first record that is more widely available, and much more of a pure record than an artist's edition, so I know what he’s saying.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Since 2002, he has performed live, taught workshops and created scores of unique instruments and installations across Europe, North and South America and New Zealand.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


For the 'PUSHING' event, Derek will do a reading entitled 'Schematic as Score: Uses and Abuses of the (In)Deterministic Possibilities of Sound Technology', and after that he will do a live set based on researching analogue visuals with the oscilloscope.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Instead, he came over to do a reading from his text 'Schematic as a Score' and did a live set of Tektronix Oscilloscope Music.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


For TGC#3 he developed a tool that is a learning counterpart to his own musical input.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The invitation was perfectly suited for a project in public space that he had in mind for 'Pushing Scores'.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


It was particularly of interested to us because of the way in which he focuses on the reproduction of music.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


The relation between the sound on the records and the visuals on the sleeves and packaging has a strong influence on his current practice, especially in relation to the strategy and concepts he creates for graphic design.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


In it he transposed compositional methodologies of the avant-gardists in the twentieth century to graphic design methodologies, for instance, by understanding Steve Reich's phase shifting technique through the lens of design.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


From his own position, he considers himself as (editorial) designer, curator, musician and publisher with a strong predilection for language and typography.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


Since 2002, he has performed live, taught workshops and created scores of unique instruments and installations across Europe, North and South America and New Zealand.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


In it he considers it axiomatic that, for every work of art that must be considered experimental, the possibility of failure must be built into its process.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


By this he does not mean the aestheticised, satisfying disturbances and cracking that Kim Cascone valorises, but the lack of satisfaction caused by a misplaced or misdirected procedure in the experiment, colossal or banal.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


One of the originators of 'participatory art', in which the artwork can only be experienced by the active involvement of the viewer, he is most famous for his 'Event Scores', such as 'Drip Music' (1962), and is widely seen as an important precursor to conceptual art.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


We became friends and he mailed instruction cards to me.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


For his 'Vehicle Sundown Event', he published a set of about fifty cards to be given to participants who participated in the event with their vehicles.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


The way in which he arrives at his poetry is very closely linked to his knowledge and skills of the programming language.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


For this he developed specific software that generates poetry in spoken-word form.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


Through his compositions he has developed a rhythmic language devoid of regular beat or metre, and he has created a new musical notation to represent his music.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


This rhythmic language and animated notation, and the structural methods he uses in composition, were the subject of his Master's thesis at Mills College.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


As he explains, 'By intently focusing on small differences, both in rhythm and pitch, the ear gets tuned to a microscopic mode of listening.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


As he explains, 'By intently focusing on small differences, both in rhythm and pitch, the ear gets tuned to a microscopic mode of listening.
└ from 22 — Anitation


The animations of Gunnarsson were also used by Goodiepal when he visited DE PLAYER on 17 Dec 2015 with his project on Icelandic animated notation.
└ from 22 — Anitation


He approaches the themes he uses (including authorship) through various entities directly linked to society.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


By acting consistently within these structures he creates his works.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In a thirty-three second piece, he processed 70,200 quotations of foreign works, all of which he submitted individually via forms to the German Buma Stemra (GEMA).
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Eventually, he was accompanied by numerous journalists with a small truck full of completed applications to the GEMA Directorate General in Berlin.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


This is close to his work ‘Charts Music’, in which he used the share prices of various companies to derive pitches.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


For another work he commissioned composers from low-wage countries to plagiarise his own music for a commission for the Festival Klangwerkstatt in Berlin.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


For much less money than Kreidler himself received as a commission, he had pieces ready for concert that were made for him in China and India.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In September 2008 a piece of press advertised his action ‘Product Placements’, with which he wanted to initiate a discussion on copyright and the height of creation in music.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In a thirty-three second piece of music, he processed 70,200 quotes of foreign works, proceeding to individually enrolled each one at the GEMA.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


For this purpose, he was accompanied by numerous press representatives to deliver a small truck's worth of completed applications to the GEMA Directorate General in Berlin.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


As a sound artist he realised how much sound there is in the mining industry and began to think in sonic terms about its impact and meaning.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Over the years he has built up an extensive sound archive around this subject.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In it he found the fragility of mining processes and the impact that mining activities have on the population and their biotope.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In the final processing of the sound, he uses the facets of mining as different sound tracks.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It made him realise how closely he was actually involved in the process of iron ore, and how his development as an artist was shaped thanks to iron ore.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


We thought he would fit very well in the 'E-ARTHHA' event with Douglas Kahn that we were already busy with planning.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Douglas Kahn is Professor of Media and Innovation at the National Institute of Experimental Arts (NIEA), University of New South Wales, Sydney, and Professor Emeritus at the University of California, Davis, where he was the Founding Director of Technocultural Studies.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Duncan's work has a lasting influence on experimental music because his art is generally still refined and refined, and he regularly collaborates with young artists.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


Since the beginning of his practice, he has made extensive use of recorded sound.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


During the presentation of Pushing Scores he will utilize the spatial dimensions of Varia and recontextualize the scores created by the archive.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


Though the two are unrelated in origin, the concept of impossible piano existed long before black MIDI, manifesting itself within Conlon Nancarrow's work involving player pianos, where he punched holes in piano cards to create extremely complex musical compositions in the same impossible, unplayable spirit of black MIDI.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


In this project, he appropriates scores of avant-garde composers and connects each note with one arbitrary point on the horizon.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


He suggested that he could do an eight-hour performance in an official office building, on a Saturday from 09:00 to 17:00.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


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