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The notation of sound has a long and varied history, from Gregorian chants conducted following signs written in the air, to the standard notation of the Western music we know today and the possibilities offered by new computer technologies.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


The program includes performances by Yann Gourdon and Floris van Hoof, works by Rafaël Rozendaal and a reading by Remco van Bladel.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Next to this there will also be graphic works by students from the Graphic Design Department of ArtEZ University of the Arts, Arnhem.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


DE PLAYER – a production platform specialising in the relationship between sound, art, publishing and performance – presents works by artists within the frame of the project 'Pushing Scores', a project by DE PLAYER and Dutch graphic designer Remco van Bladel.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Focusing on the potential of graphic scores and the publishing of sound and image, we present Telcosystems alongside their recent publication 'Resonanz', a reading from 'Schematic as a Score' and a concert by Derek Holzer and a live performance by Julia Bünnagel with modified records.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


The first stop is at Pinkie Bowtie, Antwerp, where we will introduce the entity of TGC#3 as the an unknown music magazine that it is, while pointing out its specific features by demonstrating the floppy works that already reside in the collection.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


This work, developed for The Small Museum project at Paradiso, is part of 'Pushing Scores' – a research project by DE PLAYER in connection with Remco van Bladel about the current state and potential of the 'graphical score'.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


The work is voiced by Laetitia Saedier of Stereolab.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Sat 14 & Sun 15 Apr 2018 @ Corner of Maashaven Oostzijde and Brieselaan (next to Metrostation Maashaven), Rotterdam DE PLAYER PRESENTS 'GREATEST HITS' A solo exhibition by Matthieu Reijnoudt, curated by Willem de Haan 'Greatest Hits' is an exhibition based on twenty-five hand-drawn scores by Matthieu Reijnoudt.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Pushing Scores' is a two-year artistic research project, initiated by DE PLAYER and graphic designer Remco van Bladel.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Starting from the motto ‘From Cage to JODI and beyond’, and from the avant-garde music and sound art of the twentieth century, the project researches new audio-visual languages, media and functions of graphic notation in a contemporary context characterised by a fundamental transformation of sound culture and visual culture.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


DE PLAYER was asked by the XPUB programme of Piet Zwart Institute to do a seminar during a three-month period with their students.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


The notation of sound has a long and varied history, from Gregorian chants conducted following signs written in the air, to the standard notation of the Western music we know today and the possibilities offered by new computer technologies.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


The program includes performances by Yann Gourdon and Floris van Hoof, works by Rafaël Rozendaal and a reading by Remco van Bladel.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Next to this there will also be graphic works by students from the Graphic Design Department of ArtEZ University of the Arts, Arnhem.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


We were discussing several projects and possibilities for collaboration with Defne Ayas and Samuel Saelemakers of Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art when they asked us to participate in Charlemagne Palestine's exhibition 'GesammttkkunnsttMeshuggahhLaandtttt' by organising a live event.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


The ink was absorbed by the books and, after drying, it turned out to be a series of morphing colours that shifted with each page turn.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Yann Gourdon was asked to do a hurry-curdy noisette while Charlemagne's books were projected page by page on the wall.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Justin Bennet showed his project 'Shot Gun Architecture', and Remco van Bladel introduced our project 'Pushing Scores' by doing a reading about historical and contemporary graphic scores and the concepts behind them.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Carlson invents, Colson presents: 99 spines produced on a modified Canon IR2016 copy machine' by Vaast Colson, produced on a 'prepared copier' At the 2016 WIELS Art Book Fair we presented this live-made, copy-zine by Vaast Colson named 'Carlson invents, Colson presents: 99 spines produced on a modified Canon IR2016 copy machine', which was produced on a 'prepared copier'.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


The copy machine was amplified by several internal microphones, through which the sound of every print run was recorded.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Each run of ninty-nine copies (the maximum run of the machine) was printed on transparent foil and is now accompanied by a foil cover with the dub-cut audio file in it.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


The process is always important, but the end result, which is variable for Colson and influenced by the context, is an important part of his work.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Principium 2.0 release - Remörk (Kris Delacourt), DE PLAYER This release has a shifting one-note drone (I believe I used D, F#, A, G#) that gets turned on and off by a magnetic sensor.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


We showed this piece by Remörk at ART Rotterdam and then I asked Kris if he was willing to make a publication of it, meaning a record.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


He was intrigued by the invitation, but it took a long time to develop.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The funny thing is that after the presentation at Stadslimiet, the recordings of this eight-hour performance were edited back to a 12" vinyl record, which was released by the label Ultra Eczema shortly after.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Principium' comes from the title of a project by Vaast Colson.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


He drew a number of random lines across the sticker sheets, and since there are eight by twelve stickers on a sheet you end up with tiny line segments marking each of the stickers.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's just that Kris Delacourt was so intrigued by the leftover sticker sheets, with their eight by twelve grid they just screamed 'SEQUENCER!
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The works are by a friend of mine, the Belgian artist Vaast Colson.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


What he did was draw a bunch of random lines across the sticker sheets, and since there are eight by twelve stickers on a sheet you end up with stickers with tiny line segments drawn on them.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The funny thing was that he thought his resulting collages would be nice to use as scores – and they probably would be – but it's just that I was so intrigued by the leftover sticker sheets, with their eight by twelve grid that just screamed 'SEQUENCER!
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Was one of your fears that, by making it into a 12", you would have to bring this project to a final version?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I guess my main fear was that by cutting chunks out of a much larger whole, you risk losing the context – and I'm still not sure what this record sounds like to people that weren't there.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: Do you think that, by bringing it back to an LP, you're making it easier for the listener?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But then, I don’t fully agree that you miss out on creativity by sticking to a concept.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And sometimes, by sticking to it, you end up with the most unexpected results – adhering to rules you impose on yourself makes you do stuff you would never have decided for yourself.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Focusing on the potential of graphic scores and the publishing of sound and image, we present Telcosystems alongside their recent publication 'Resonanz', a reading from 'Schematic as a Score' as well as a concert by Derek Holzer and a live performance by Julia Bünnagel with modified records.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Afterwards, she mixes them together for yielding imprudently driving, rhythmic soundscapes followed by white noise and multiple fragments of music along with dirty boom beats.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The reading begins by noting that over the past few years a strong reaction against the sterile world of laptop sound and video has inspired a new interest in analogue processes, or 'hands dirty' art, in the words of practitioner John Richards.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Analogue electronic computers pre-date their digital counterparts by several decades, and one of the first practical applications of the analogue computer was in controlling the trajectories of German V2 rockets as they traced their rainbow of gravity from Flanders towards London during the Second World War.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Informed by the discourse of media archaeology, my own personal interest in analogue vector graphics isn't merely retro-for-retro's-sake.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In 1989 the 'Broken Music' exhibition was held in Berlin at DAAD gallery with work by, among others, Nam June Paik, John Cage, Milan Knížák and Christian Marclay.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The outcomes ranged from installations to be played by the public to plastic works in which the plate was transformed, mutated.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The usual code of the record, as defined by the music industry, was broken in all works.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


As a production platform, specialised in the relationship between sound, art, publishing and performance, DE PLAYER presents works by artists within the frame of the project 'Pushing Scores' – an ongoing project by DE PLAYER and Dutch graphic designer Remco van Bladel.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


People could continuously listen to some audio publications (by Telcosystems, Cold Void and Davide Mosconi) as well take part in the production process by spraying new works for the next potential customer.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


Hiele Martens, or the collaboration of Lieven Martens Moana and Roman Hiele, delve deeply into new territory that could be interpreted as a 2017 update of Maurice Kagel's 'Exotica', but made by self-aware electronic musicians.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Bergmark is the ultimate rethinker of what music can be, in sound and in performance, evidenced by the fact that you can sometimes find him hanging on two piano strings from a ceiling.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The local WiFi station makes it possible to access all projects (on floppy disk) by receiving these projects via a mobile phone or on the computer.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The idea is that this material will be embodied by a dynamic, accessible and therefore active archive, which creates new relations, new perspectives and, at its best, new concepts for the production and/or processes of making scores.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


She played a set in which she used her computer to generate sound by live programming.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


Her work is a personal exploration of the possibilities afforded by articulated hard- and software mediation.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


The piece is voiced by Laetitia Saedier of Stereolab.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


The Small Museum, the former announcement box at the front of Paradiso, is being converted by Remco van Bladel into a local WiFi point that will stream a polyphonic 'Pa-Ra-Di-So'.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


An algorithmic choir is compiled live by the mobile phones that connect to the WiFi point while audiences are waiting in line to enter Paradiso.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


Later, the neumens – depending on the relative pitch differences – were noted above, on or below a line referring to a pitch determined by the choral conductor.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


As far as melody is concerned, humming was increasingly defined by the expansion of the number of lines, which first corresponded by colour and later by keys to certain steps in the medieval ranges.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


In the middle of the thirteenth century, Peter de Cruce came to a notation in which the relative duration of each note is indicated by the form of the note.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


The third stage deals with the mechanical reproduction of music and the fourth stage could be considered as already referring to the idea of sampling, although it was only first published in translation by the University of Minnesota in 1985.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


For the 2015 edition of the Venice Biennale, the studio was responsible for the design of the publication and identity of 'to be all ways to be', the exhibition by herman de vries for the Dutch Pavilion.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


In it he transposed compositional methodologies of the avant-gardists in the twentieth century to graphic design methodologies, for instance, by understanding Steve Reich's phase shifting technique through the lens of design.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


His artistic practice is formed by a number of ingredients that have always been present in his work to a greater or lesser extent.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


We became familiar with the work of Derek Holzer through his project on tonewheels – an experiment in converting graphical imagery to sound, inspired by some of the pioneering twentieth century electronic music inventions.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


By this he does not mean the aestheticised, satisfying disturbances and cracking that Kim Cascone valorises, but the lack of satisfaction caused by a misplaced or misdirected procedure in the experiment, colossal or banal.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


Many artists try to eliminate true, catastrophic failures by scripting, scoring, sequencing or programming their work in as many predictable, risk-free quantums as possible in advance.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


A theoretical and historical text about the concept, written by Derek Holzer, 23 Nov 2016, Helsinki THE VECTORIAN ERA: An Investigation into Analogue Computer Graphics The Vectorian Era opens with a screaming across the sky.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


Analogue electronic computers pre-date their digital counterparts by several decades, and one of the first practical applications of the analogue computer was in controlling the trajectories of German V2 rockets as they traced their rainbow of gravity from Flanders towards London during the Second World War.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


As Friedrich Kittler has observed, the relationship of media technology to military tools of destruction was sealed by moments such as these.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


An example is 'Tennis for Two', programmed in 1958 by William Higinbotham on an analogue computer at Brookhaven National Laboratories in Long Island, New York, using an oscilloscope as the display.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


This gave birth to the realtime-controllable, analogue modular synthesizer, which was subsequently expanded by others such as Bob Moog and Serge Tcherepnin.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


In 1967, the Sony Portapak revolutionised video by taking the camera out of the television studio and into the hands of amateurs and artists.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


And by the early 1970s, an interest in cybernetics, systems theory and automatic processes brought the analog computer closer to the worlds of art, music and architecture.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


The 1972 Rutt-Etra Video Synthesizer, used famously by the Vasuka's in several works, employed an analogue computer to manipulate and deconstruct the raster of a conventional video signal with very otherworldly effects.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


Vector graphics were widely adopted by video game manufacturers in the late 1970s due to their computational efficiency, and the wealth of experience using them that the history of analogue computing provided.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


Perhaps the most iconic of these games is Asteroids', a space shooter released by Atari in 1979.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


Informed by the discourse of media archaeology, my own personal interest in analogue vector graphics isn't merely retro-for-retro's-sake.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


One of the originators of 'participatory art', in which the artwork can only be experienced by the active involvement of the viewer, he is most famous for his 'Event Scores', such as 'Drip Music' (1962), and is widely seen as an important precursor to conceptual art.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


Of specific inspiration is the fact that his works are composed of simple instructions and can be performed by anybody, giving them a highly democratic factor without losing their artistic impact.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


A baton is a stick that is used by conductors primarily to enlarge and enhance the manual and bodily movements associated with directing an ensemble of musicians.
└ from 18 — Dirigeerstok


Later, the neumens – depending on the relative pitch differences – were noted above, on or below a line referring to a pitch determined by the choral conductor.
└ from 18 — Dirigeerstok


Fricatives' are consonants produced by forcing air through a narrow channel made by placing two articulators close together.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


Image and sound are created immediately during the performance by speaking and vocalising into a microphone and modifying the voice through signal processors and samplers while the software is analysing the sound to create animated abstract visual text-compositions.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


For each record a unique piece is generated that is spoken and performed by the same software.
└ from 19 — Jörg Piringer


Orientation with regard to giving meaning changes by inserting moments when improper use of thought, material and technology takes place.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


The foundation of language as an information transmission is the foundation of these tendencies and is at the heart of the oral tradition principle, influencing how stories can be told, how traditions are passed on, how the past feeds the present and how the present forms itself by muttering the past.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


IRREGULAR #2313 STRIPPED Fri 14 Oct 2011 21:00 @ Wall Gallery, Rotterdam with Fersteinn Fersteinn (IS) is a quartet of multi-instrumentalists that play compositions by Guðmundur Steinn Gunnarsson, a repertoire that is written especially for the ensemble.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


Most compositions are made by Guðmundur Steinn Gunnarsson.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


This technique of composing is performed by Guðmundur Steinn Gunnarsson and his quartet Fersteinn.
└ from 22 — Anitation


The animations of Gunnarsson were also used by Goodiepal when he visited DE PLAYER on 17 Dec 2015 with his project on Icelandic animated notation.
└ from 22 — Anitation


He gave a lecture on this subject and played several pieces with Daniel S. Bøtcher, Grøn, Nynne Roberta Pedersen, amongst which some were by Gunnarsson.
└ from 22 — Anitation


His music has been performed by the BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra, the Iceland Symphony Orchestra, Caput Ensemble, Reykjavík Chamber Orchestra, Ensemble Adapter, Tøyen Fil og Klafferi, Ensemble l’Arsenale, Ensemble CRUSH, Aksiom Ensemble, Nordic Affect, Defun Ensemble, Iceland Flute Choir, Duo Harpverk, Roberto Durante, Markus Hohti, Mathias Ziegler, Georgia Browne, Timo Kinnunen, Shayna Dunkelmann, Una Sveinbjarnardóttir and Tinna Þosteinsdóttir.
└ from 22 — Anitation


Eventually, he was accompanied by numerous journalists with a small truck full of completed applications to the GEMA Directorate General in Berlin.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


The music production facility is consciously located in a legal grey area, which has been greatly enlarged by digital technologies.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In this piece, too, reference is made to the borderline areas of copyright, and credits composers and copyright holders mentioned by the respective companies instead of Kreidler himself.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Product Placements by Johannes Kreidler is a 10" blue vinyl with poster and Xerox copies, edition of 150 pieces.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


For this purpose, he was accompanied by numerous press representatives to deliver a small truck's worth of completed applications to the GEMA Directorate General in Berlin.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


The plant is deliberately located in a legal gray area, which has been greatly enlarged by digital technologies, so that it is impossible to clarify the case so far.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


How Could You) Bring Him Home' by Eamon ''(I'm Gonna Be) 500 Miles' by The Proclaimers with Brian Potter & Andy Pipkin '(Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear' by Elvis Presley with The Jordanaires ''(You Want To) Make A Memory' by Bon Jovi '1234' by Feist '1973' by James Blunt '2 Hearts' by Kylie Minogue '3's & 7's' by Queens Of The Stone Age '4 Am Forever' by Lostprophets '4 In The Morning' by Gwen Stefani '505' by Arctic Monkeys 'A Bad Dream' by Keane 'A Big Hunk O' Love' by Elvis Presley With The Jordanaires 'A Day In The Life' by Larrikin Love 'A Moment Like This' by Leona Lewis 'A Never Ending Dream' by Cascada 'A Public Affair' by Jessica Simpson 'A Whole New World' by Katie Price & Peter Andre 'About You Now' by Sugababes 'About Your Dress' by The Maccabees 'Acceptable In The 80s' by Calvin Harris 'Acrylic' by The Courteeners 'Adagio For Strings' by DJ Tiesto 'Ain't No Party' by Orson 'Alarm Clock' by The Rumble Strips 'Alfie' by Lily Allen 'All Good Things (Come To An End)' by Nelly Furtado 'All I Got' by Newton Faulkner 'All I Need To Know' by Emma Bunton 'All I Want For Christmas Is You' by Mariah Carey 'All My Friends' by LCD Soundsystem 'All She Wrote' by Ross Copperman 'Almost Easy' by Avenged Sevenfold 'Always On My Mind' by Elvis Presley 'Amazing' by Seal 'America' by Razorlight 'An American Trilogy' by Elvis Presley 'An End Has A Start' by Editors 'Anarchy In The UK' by The Sex Pistols 'Angel On My Shoulder' by Gareth Gates 'Annie Let's Not Wait' by Guillemots 'Anonymous' by Bobby Valentino feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Timbaland 'Another One Bites The Dust' by Queen vs.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


The Miami Project 'Anthem' by Filo & Peri feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Eric Lumiere 'Any Dream Will Do' by Lee Mead 'Anything' by JoJo 'Anything Can Happen In The Next Half Hour' by Enter Shikari 'Apologize' by Timbaland feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


One Republic 'Are You Trying To Be Lonely' by Andy Lewis & Paul Weller 'Arnold Layne' by David Gilmour 'Australia' by The Shins 'Autumnsong' by Manic Street Preachers 'Away From Here' by The Enemy 'Axle Grinder' by Pendulum 'Ayo Technology' by 50 Cent feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Justin Timberlake & Timbaland 'Baby Baby' by Sunblock feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Sandy 'Baby Fratelli' by The Fratellis 'Baby Love' by Nicole Scherzinger Feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Will.I.Am 'Baby When The Light' by David Guetta 'Baby's Coming Back' by McFly 'Baby's Coming Back/Transylvania' by McFly 'Back To Black' by Amy Winehouse 'Backfire At The Disco' by The Wombats 'Bad Girl (At Night)'' by Dave Spoon feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Lisa Maffia 'Balloons' by Foals 'Barbie Girl' by Samanda 'Be Without You' by WiFi 'Beautiful Girls' by Sean Kingston 'Beautiful Liar' by Beyonce & Shakira 'Beautiful Ones' by Billiam 'Because Of You' by Ne-Yo 'Bed' by J.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Holiday 'Before I Fall To Pieces' by Razorlight 'Beggin' by The Four Seasons 'Beginning Of The End' by Status Quo 'Best Of You' by Foo Fighters 'Bet On It' by Zac Efron 'Better' by Tom Baxter 'Beware Of The Dog' by Jamelia 'Big Girl (You Are Beautiful)' by Mika 'Big Girls Don't Cry' by Fergie 'Bigger Than Big' by Super Mal 'Bing Bang (Time To Dance)' by Lazytown 'Blag Steal & Borrow' by Koopa 'Bleed It Out' by Linkin Park 'Bleeding Love' by Leona Lewis 'Blood Sugar' by Pendulum 'Blood Sugar/Axle Grinder' by Pendulum 'Blue Suede Shoes' by Elvis Presley 'Bones' by The Killers 'Boogie 2nite' by Booty Luv 'Books From Boxes' by Maxïmo Park 'Borders' by The Sunshine Underground 'Break Up' by Kim Sozzi 'Breaking Free' by Zac Efron, Andrew Seeley & Vanessa Hudgens 'Breathless' by Shayne Ward 'Brianstorm' by Arctic Monkeys 'Bubbly' by Colbie Caillat 'Burn Faster' by Nine Black Alps 'Burning Love' by Elvis Presley 'Call The Shots' by Girls Aloud 'Calm Down Dearest' by Jamie T 'Can We Chill' by Ne-Yo 'Can't Get Along (Without You)' by Hard-Fi 'Candyman' by Christina Aguilera 'Carolyna' by Melanie C 'Catch You' by Sophie Ellis-Bextor 'Chain Hang Low' by Jibbs 'Change' by Sugababes 'Changes' by Gareth Gates 'Charlotte' by Air Traffic 'Chasing Cars' by Snow Patrol 'Chelsea Dagger' by The Fratellis 'Clean Up Your Eyes' by The Dykeenies 'Closer' by Travis 'Clothes Off' by Gym Class Heroes 'Clumsy' by Fergie 'Con Te Partiro' by Andrea Bocelli 'Counting Down The Days' by Sunfreakz Feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Andrea Britton 'Cowboy' by Ch!pz 'Crank That (Soulja Boy)' by Soulja Boy Tell'em 'Crash' by Matt Willis 'Crazy' by Lumidee 'Crazy' by Gnarls Barkley 'Crush Crush Crush' by Paramore 'Cry Over Me' by Meat Loaf 'Cupid's Chokehold' by Gym Class Heroes feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Patrick Stump 'Curvy Cola Bottle Body' by Chico 'D.A.N.C.E.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


by Justice 'Dance Tonight' by Paul McCartney 'Dancefloor' by The Holloways 'Dancing Lasha Tumbai' by Verka Serduchka 'Dare Me (Stupidisco)' by Junior Jack feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Shena 'Dark Road' by Annie Lennox 'Delivery' by Babyshambles 'Desecration Smile' by Red Hot Chili Peppers 'Destination Calabria' by Alex Gaudino feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Crystal Waters 'Different World' by Iron Maiden 'Do It' by Nelly Furtado 'Do It 2 Me' by Cushh 'Do It Again' by The Chemical Brothers 'Do It Well' by Jennifer Lopez 'Do It Yourself (Go Out And Get It)' by Uniting Nations 'Do They Know It's Christmas?
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


by Band Aid 'Do Without My Love' by Nathan [UK] 'Do You Know?
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


The Ping Pong Song)' by Enrique Iglesias 'Doing It Right' by The Go!
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Team 'Don't' by Elvis Presley With The Jordanaires 'Don't Dance' by Midas 'Don't Give It Up' by Siobhan Donaghy
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Stained by the passage of time, scratched, with their covers eaten by moths, the records are signed and dated; they exist as passive witnesses of a displacement in time and space.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


This takes shape by building digital interfaces; instrumentation used to explore, amplify and reflect what is barely visible, tangible or audible, while expressing the resonance and relationship between people, plants and organic matter.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


Her spider web record player, which she developed for this purpose, is an instrument that plays, registers and converts a spider web into sound by means of light sensors.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


These structures are scores and instruments unreadable/unplayable by humans, but interpretable through speculative fabulation, in the case of the recordings I create.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


ORE by BJ Nilsen This work by BJ Nilsen can be seen as an observing documentary and is related to time-lapse filmmaking.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In this way, the work creates a third space that belongs to the individual listener and that arises from the interaction between the original space and the imaginary space, created by the composition, the sound processing and the perception of the listener.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The musique concrète, as developed by Henry at GRM, was made by magnetic tape.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


His best known book, 'Noise, Water, Meat: A History of Sound in the Arts', was published by MIT Press in 1999.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Mining' by BJ Nilsen, 'Jazz' by Max Franklin and 'Earthquake' by Aurelie Lierman.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


When it was empty, I mapped out the building by recording it.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The next phase in the processing of iron is represented by recordings from inside the Tata Steel factories in Wijk aan Zee, 30 kilometers from Amsterdam.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Modernity is made by the manipulation and transmutation of organic and synthetic materials through design and research.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


More waste means more costs.’ From an interview with Marco Keersemaker, CITG, Technical University Delft, by Benny Nilsen, 2018.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


We trace out all the veins of the earth, and yet, living upon it, undermined as it is beneath our feet, are astonished that it should occasionally cleave asunder or tremble: As though, forsooth, these signs could be any other than expressions of the indignation felt by our sacred parent!
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Interview with Ylva Ståhl and Kristoffer Johansson from the Sydvaranger mine in Kirkenes, by Benny Nilsen, Hilde Methi and Annette Wolfsberger, conducted in March 2018.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Interview with Ylva Ståhl and Kristoffer Johansson from the Sydvaranger mine in Kirkenes, by Benny Nilsen, Hilde Methi and Annette Wolfsberger, conducted in March 2018.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The sounds of nature are not often interrupted by other sounds.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Were they forced up North by circumstances?
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


For me it relates directly to iron ore in so far that the type of musique concrète and tape music developed at GRM was made possible by magnetic tape.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It made me recognise again how close we are to the source of ore, and how my development as an artist was shaped by iron ore.' 'The iron ore is refined and filtered, making sure the pure magnetite comes out.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Black Moon by John Duncan Black Moon is composed of shortwave radio signals, recorded via the online receiver website of the Technical University of Enschede.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


The record can thus be considered as a potential composition, which is performed by the listener themselves through the aforementioned process.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


During the presentation of Pushing Scores he will utilize the spatial dimensions of Varia and recontextualize the scores created by the archive.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


The idea is that this material will be embodied by a dynamic, accessible and therefore active archive, which creates new relations, new perspectives and, at its best, new concepts for the production and/or processes of making scores.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


During an evening at the Varia collective, where Valentia Vuksic and Ana Guedes also played a live set and explained their work and backgrounds, Niek Hilkmann, who is part of the Varia team, presented his Universal Notation Ideal (UNI) – a Pay2Print research into the simultaneous production and distribution of standardised graphic scores by means of an automatic machine.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


The UNI was developed by Niek Hilkmann and Joseph Knierzinger, and it is a machine into which a coin is inserted and from which a printed score is then delivered.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


Black MIDI was first employed by Shirasagi Yukki at Kuro Yuki Gohan's rendition of 'U.N.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The popularity of black MIDI transitioned into Europe and the United States due to a video of a composition uploaded by Kakakakaito1998 in February 2011.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Shortly thereafter, blackers from around the world began pushing limits of the style by making compositions with notes increasing into the millions and using an enormous number of colours and patterns to match the complexity of the notes.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


The first of these tracks to reach the million-note mark was that of 'Necrofantasia' from the Touhou Project video game 'Perfect Cherry Blossom', arranged by TheTrustedComputer.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


While black MIDIs of Japanese video game music and anime are still common, the genre has also begun spilling into modern-day pop songs, such as 'Wrecking Ball' by Miley Cyrus.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Black MIDI first received coverage by Michael Connor, a writer for the non-profit arts organisation Rhizome, in September 2013, leading to attention from publications and bloggers including 'Aux', 'Gawker's Adrian Chen', 'Jason Kottke' and 'The Verge'.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Spectral Arrows by Marco Fusinato (live recordings by Gerben Kokmeijer, edited by Marco Fusinato) Stuttering live concrete, wailing feedback, Xenakis-esque swarms of descending glissandi, abusive guitar wrangling, walls of harsh static on a double sided black vinyl containing edited sound from the live recording of Marco Fusinato's endurance performance 'Spectral Arrows' for DE PLAYER on 18 May 2013 at Groothandelsgebouw, Rotterdam, the Netherlands.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


One of these labels was Circle Records, which had been up and running for a few years, headed by John Nixon, Julian Dashper and Marc Fusinato.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


In these works, treated by Fusinato as propositions for new noise compositions, the qualities of each individual note and their relation to those around them are effectively compressed into a single point of intense concentration.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


a b o u t t h i s a r c h i v e
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G e n e r a t e s c o r e !