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Focusing on the potential of graphic scores and the publishing of sound and image, we present Telcosystems alongside their recent publication 'Resonanz', a reading from 'Schematic as a Score' and a concert by Derek Holzer and a live performance by Julia Bünnagel with modified records.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


TGC#3 is compiled in collaboration with students of the Piet Zwart Institute who undertake the Experimental Publishing programme, also known as XPUB.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Sun 15 Oct 2017 15:00 @ Pinkie Bowtie, Antwerp TETRA GAMMA CIRCULAIRE #3 @ PINKIE BOWTIE/AN INFORMATIVE FLOPPY SESSION Tetra Gamma Circulaire #3 (TGC#3) is now travelling as an open, floppy platform.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


The first stop is at Pinkie Bowtie, Antwerp, where we will introduce the entity of TGC#3 as the an unknown music magazine that it is, while pointing out its specific features by demonstrating the floppy works that already reside in the collection.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


This project, which focuses on what we have come to refer to as the ‘graphic score’, has been running over the last two to three years.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


What are the possibilities of the graphic score in a day and age in which graphic notation is still commonly seen as 'drawing', merely serving as some kind of sheet music?
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


Throughout the project, Jacques Attali’s book, 'Noise: The Political Economy of Music', will function as a reference and inspirational guide; pushing the score in search of its current potential.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


A number of specific themes will be initiated, developed and presented in the context of a public research programme in collaboration with artists, designers and various cultural organisations, such as the Piet Zwart Institute, the Witte de With Center for Contemporary Art and Sonic Acts.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


What are the possibilities of the graphic score, in a day and age in which graphic notation is still commonly seen as 'drawing', merely serving as some kind of sheet music?
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


TGC#3 is compiled in collaboration with students of the Piet Zwart Institute who undertake the Experimental Publishing programme, also known as XPUB.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


‘Fred Flintstone meets the twenty-first century’, it was referred to as.
└ from 02 — Release - Tetra Gamma Circulaire 3


Contributors: YANN GOURDON (FR) Hurdy-gurdy player, composer and sound artist Yann Gourdon looks at vibratory fields and sound perception as a medium.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


RAFAËL ROZENDAAL (NL) Rafaël Rozendaal is a visual artist who uses the Internet as his canvas.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Nevertheless, he showed me some books he once made in New York, which he said were to be seen as musical scores.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Rafaël Rozendaal showed his web work 'Slow Empty', which functioned as real-time clockwork for the event.
└ from 04 — Noting Denoting


Because his work is pretty conceptual, you could say that there is always a strategy (call it a score) that operates as a framework underpinning his artistic output.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


This print run is to be seen as a performative action.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Colson belongs to a younger generation of Antwerp artists who could be referred to as 'post-ironic'.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Everything he undertakes can thus be considered as artistic intervention.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


Principium 1.0' appeared as a hacked synth reduced to a single octave, to be played with magnets on a colourful playing field, parallelling the same patterns.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


For it, Kris Delacourt (Remörk) had made a modified Casio keyboard as a reinterpretation of Vaast Colson's work 'Principium'.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It was presented at Stadslimiet, Antwerp, as an installation piece on 2 Jul 2015.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Colson then asked some artist to make reinterpretations of the works and from here the idea to use them as a music score originated.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Interestingly, he thought his resulting collages would be nice to use as scores – and they probably would have been.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And so, he went on to design 'Principium 1.0'; a magnetic board with the same field as the sticker sheets, which he activated with magnets as a synthesizer.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The idea was to put white magnets atop of the coloured dots as a way to blank them out.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: Well actually, it started out as an artwork, or rather a series of artworks.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It just rang as very poetic to me.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


And at a certain point he posed something like: 'I've made some work that might be interesting to use as a score, would you be up for it?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The funny thing was that he thought his resulting collages would be nice to use as scores – and they probably would be – but it's just that I was so intrigued by the leftover sticker sheets, with their eight by twelve grid that just screamed 'SEQUENCER!
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's an iron board and it has the same visuals as the sticker sheets.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


So we put two and two together, and ended up doing twelve 10" lathe cuts (which came in a box with those electronic switches), with eight magnets each as based on the original grid and a 12" metal platter to sit under the 10" for the magnets to stick to.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


So I went through eight hours of recordings, selecting bits that I liked and that I thought would be interesting enough to listen to as pieces in their own right, and not just as part of this monster performance.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I can still see unexplored possibilities there – as an installation, or as a truly playable musical instrument, and even those two do not have to be mutually exclusive.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


There's something appealing in using a single octave as a building block.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I thought it worked really well as a performance, but I wanted to make sure it was good enough to be a record.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I like working with concepts a lot, as a starting point, but I'm also interested enough in the results to loosen up the concept if I feel it's needed.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: I could say that the 10" records were vinyl records as a tool, and that this LP is a vinyl record as a product.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: The 10" records have all been sold as well, so they sit somewhere in the middle.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


They were intended as a release, and therefore a product, just as well.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But they do form one big piece, and as far as final forms go, I guess you could consider the performance to be the final form of that particular piece.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It really was a one-time event, with the vinyls functioning as a tool, yes.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: You release this album as a Remörk album, but there were more people involved in this project than just you.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


So do you see this album as a solo record or as a collaboration?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Kris Delacourt: I do look at it as a solo thing.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But Vaast, for instance, refuses to regard it as his doing.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


The notion that an idea can be just as valid and just as creative as its execution.., But anyway, I am always glad if I manage to turn an idea into a physical form.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Coming up with a concept can be as much a creative process as navigating its actualisation.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: The Ultra Eczema site refers to this record as your debut LP.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Does it feel like that for you too: As your first 'real' album, as a statement?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Or maybe Dennis thinks of that series as a tool more than a product.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


I don't think of it as a manifesto or anything.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


It's a document of what I'm happy to be working on at the moment, and hopefully it's something that others can enjoy as well.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


DE PLAYER: Do you see this as a drone record?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Or as a collage record?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Or perhaps you would perceive it as a failure if it weren't enjoyable without the concept?
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


But I did try to select bits that I thought had a beauty or a strong appeal to them, an interesting evolution or whatever, so much so that I hope they can survive as musical pieces in their own right.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


Focusing on the potential of graphic scores and the publishing of sound and image, we present Telcosystems alongside their recent publication 'Resonanz', a reading from 'Schematic as a Score' as well as a concert by Derek Holzer and a live performance by Julia Bünnagel with modified records.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


What are the possibilities of graphic scores, in a day and age in which graphic notation is still commonly seen as a 'drawing', merely serving as some kind of sheet music?
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Julia's peculiar method of modifying vinyl records includes various forms of physical treatment such as sewing, painting or pasting the vinyl surfaces.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


For the 'PUSHING' event, Derek will do a reading entitled 'Schematic as Score: Uses and Abuses of the (In)Deterministic Possibilities of Sound Technology', and after that he will do a live set based on researching analogue visuals with the oscilloscope.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Artists and inventors such as Nam June Paik, Steina & Woody Vasulka, Don Buchla, Serge Tcherepnin, Dan Sandin and David Tudor all constructed their own unique instruments long before similar tools became commercially available or freely downloadable.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Analogue electronic computers pre-date their digital counterparts by several decades, and one of the first practical applications of the analogue computer was in controlling the trajectories of German V2 rockets as they traced their rainbow of gravity from Flanders towards London during the Second World War.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


They did a reading on the concepts and necessity of the project, as well as all the implications resulting from its development and production.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


Instead, he came over to do a reading from his text 'Schematic as a Score' and did a live set of Tektronix Oscilloscope Music.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In the case of the 'prepared record', the record or musical piece is not used as a reproductive technique.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In contrast to the composer or musician who perceives the record first and foremost as a vehicle transporting his or her musical ideas, here the interest lies especially in the optical/sculptural, as well as the acoustic presence and the compression of an idea when working with the playback possibilities and impossibilities of recording techniques.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The defective record, as opposed the standardised smooth reproduction of sound, means quality and concept at the same time.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In other words, this means that reproduction (repetitions of already existing relations) without richer viewpoints from the special standpoint of creative production can, only in the best cases, be considered as a virtuosic opportunity.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


The usual code of the record, as defined by the music industry, was broken in all works.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


We decided to envision the framework for the installation as a three-dimensional staff to write down music.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


By doing so, we developed a multidimensional approach to the tactics that can be used for making scores and how the outcomes could finally exist as a tradable object.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


People could continuously listen to some audio publications (by Telcosystems, Cold Void and Davide Mosconi) as well take part in the production process by spraying new works for the next potential customer.
└ from 08 — Art Rotterdam Presentation


Hiele Martens, or the collaboration of Lieven Martens Moana and Roman Hiele, delve deeply into new territory that could be interpreted as a 2017 update of Maurice Kagel's 'Exotica', but made by self-aware electronic musicians.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


HELGA JAKOBSON (CA) Whether culminating in actions or objects, Helga Jakobson's work responds to conditions of limbo within existence and acts as a platform to confront the unknown, focusing on death, time and ephemerality.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Jakobson has great reverence for intuition and it's use as a technology within her work.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


His performances have been described as surrealist puppet theatre in which the characters are amplified objects such as old tools, kitchen utensils, toys, springs and decorative kitsch.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


A publication was taken as a joint focal point, the form of which could be determined in more detail.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


However, it was decided to start from the floppy disc as a medium.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The idea of a score functioned as a guideline to shape their project and to test the working process.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


It resulted in the Tetra Gamma Circular #3, subtitled 'An unknown audio magazine', and is in itself a certain kind of publication platform that functions almost as a jukebox for floppy disks.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Designed as a concrete object in which various techniques are incorporated, its core consists of a floppy drive and a Raspberry Pi platform, on which a local WiFi station, a camera, an audio in/output, touch sensors and LED lighting are realised.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Whether it is about recording movements for archiving, or writing new choreographies for the future, she concentrated on which elements of dance are overwritable (such as direction or footwork) and which are not.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


The performance of 'Rock Step Triple Step' started as an experiment based on psychological theories around changing memory, time perception and flow in dance.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


Through research into the act of improvisation in music, Max investigates ideas about liberation and resistance present in improvisation; both in artistic practices, and their broader application as a critical methodology of research and exploration.
└ from 09 — MAT>NET>PU TGC3 Presentation


What are the possibilities of graphic scores, in a day and age in which graphic notation is still usually seen as a 'drawing', merely serving as some kind of sheet music?
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


To communicate the project to a larger audience, DE PLAYER asked Varia to develop a context and technical environment as a web-based archival publication for the 'Pushing Scores' project.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


In reaction to the dematerialisation of music (the general disappearance of music released in its physical form), the artists of the ARTKILLART label roster refocus their releases as material objects.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


By writing choreographies for software and computer elements, she utilises these technologies as actors in software/noise pieces for, and in, computers.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


Vuksic considers the time and space of computer processing and memory as levels of reality.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


The mechanic noises serve as mediators to a public.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


As far as melody is concerned, humming was increasingly defined by the expansion of the number of lines, which first corresponded by colour and later by keys to certain steps in the medieval ranges.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


After learning of Attali's book, 'Noise: The Political Economy of Music', we used it as inspiration for the project 'Pushing Scores'.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


This notation of music can be considered as a highly coded written guideline for how music should sound.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


The third stage deals with the mechanical reproduction of music and the fourth stage could be considered as already referring to the idea of sampling, although it was only first published in translation by the University of Minnesota in 1985.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


Jacques Attali (born 1 Nov 1943) is a French economic and social theorist, writer, political adviser and senior civil servant, who served as a counsellor to President François Mitterrand from 1981 to 1991 and was the first head of the European Bank for Reconstruction and Development from 1991 to 1993.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


The argument of 'Noise' is that music, unique among the arts for reasons that are themselves overdetermined, has precisely this annunciatory vocation; that the music of today stands both as a promise of a new, liberating mode of production, and as the menace of a dystopian possibility – which stands as that mode of production's baleful mirror image.
└ from 12 — Jacques Attali


We had common interests, but at the same time approached the topic from different angles given our differing networks of practice and our outputs as a stage, publisher and designer.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


From his own position, he considers himself as (editorial) designer, curator, musician and publisher with a strong predilection for language and typography.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


Both as a source or inspiration, as a metaphor, as a thinking model and as an 'attitude' in relation to his practice.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


He sees it as punk, experimental, noise, investigative and critical, searching for dissonance and ordering of information, for rhythm and tonality.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


This tactility, the application of materiality and the use of printing techniques as a metaphor for sound play a major role in his entire practice.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


He came up with the idea to give a reading of his text 'Schematics as a Score', because that was a current issue of his practice.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


http://macumbista.net Derek Holzer gave a lecture titled 'Schematic as Score: Use and Abuse of the (In)Deterministic Possibilities of Sound Technology'.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


Many artists try to eliminate true, catastrophic failures by scripting, scoring, sequencing or programming their work in as many predictable, risk-free quantums as possible in advance.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


Artists and inventors such as Nam June Paik, Steina and Woody Vasulka, Don Buchla, Serge Tcherepnin, Dan Sandin and David Tudor all constructed their own unique instruments long before similar tools became commercially available or could be freely downloaded.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


Artists and inventors such as Nam June Paik, Steina & Woody Vasulka, Don Buchla, Serge Tcherepnin, Dan Sandin and David Tudor all constructed their own unique instruments long before similar tools became commercially available or could be freely downloaded.
└ from 15 — Schematic as Design


In 2011, Derek Holzer wrote an essay on this issue, which has since been published on the Internet as a downloadable PDF called 'VAGUE TERRAIN 19'.
└ from 15 — Schematic as Design


It draws on the historical work of artists such as Mary Ellen Bute, John Whitney, Nam June Paik, Ben Laposky and Steina & Woody Vasulka, among many others, as well as on ideas of media archaeology and the creative reuse of obsolete technologies.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


Audio waveforms control the vertical and horizontal movements as well as the brightness of a single beam of light, tracing shapes, points and curves with a direct relationship between sound and image.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


During this workshop, the attendants learnt how to use a custom library in the Pure Data programming environment to directly control the vertical and horizontal movements, as well as the brightness, of a beam of light.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


He did a reading of his text 'Schematic as a Score' alongside a live concert derived from his research on analogue visuals with the oscilloscope.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


Analogue electronic computers pre-date their digital counterparts by several decades, and one of the first practical applications of the analogue computer was in controlling the trajectories of German V2 rockets as they traced their rainbow of gravity from Flanders towards London during the Second World War.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


As Friedrich Kittler has observed, the relationship of media technology to military tools of destruction was sealed by moments such as these.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


An example is 'Tennis for Two', programmed in 1958 by William Higinbotham on an analogue computer at Brookhaven National Laboratories in Long Island, New York, using an oscilloscope as the display.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


It combined a two-player interface with physics models of a bouncing ball displayed as vectors in motion, and is arguably the first publicly playable video game.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


This gave birth to the realtime-controllable, analogue modular synthesizer, which was subsequently expanded by others such as Bob Moog and Serge Tcherepnin.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


Figures such as Heinz von Foerster, Gordon Pask, Nam June Paik, Steina & Woody Vasulka, Iannis Xenakis and R. Buckminster Fuller all speculated on the effect of computers on society, and used computer-derived forms in their work.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


Battle Zone' (1980), 'Tempest' (1981), and 'Star Wars' (1983) all stand as other notable examples from this Vectorian Era, and also as rudimentary training tools for the future e-warriors who would remotely guide missiles into Iraqi bunkers at the start of the next decade.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


George Brecht (27 Aug 1926–5 Dec 2008), born George Ellis MacDiarmid, was an American conceptual artist and avant-garde composer, as well as a professional chemist who worked as a consultant for companies including Pfizer, Johnson & Johnson and Mobil Oil.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


One of the originators of 'participatory art', in which the artwork can only be experienced by the active involvement of the viewer, he is most famous for his 'Event Scores', such as 'Drip Music' (1962), and is widely seen as an important precursor to conceptual art.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


He described his own art as a way of 'ensuring that the details of everyday life, the random constellations of objects that surround us, stop going unnoticed.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


Participants performed about fifty instructions such as 'turn on lights', 'start engine', 'stop engine' and 'open window'.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


The fact that the work is purely language-based also hones in on our interest, as DE PLAYER has been publishing and presenting a lot of sound poetry over the years.
└ from 17 — Event Scores


The foundation of language as an information transmission is the foundation of these tendencies and is at the heart of the oral tradition principle, influencing how stories can be told, how traditions are passed on, how the past feeds the present and how the present forms itself by muttering the past.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


Publishing, as mentioned above, is important to communicate various ways of expression.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


a tape recorder or telephone), but also self-invented technical devices and software as well as other machines (e.g.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


Here it has played an important role and as such it is still current.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


Fersteinn plays from animations made as compositions on a laptop.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


Guðmundur Steinn Gunnarsson (born 1982) is an Icelandic composer, performer and a founding member of S.L.Á.T.U.R., an experimental arts organisation in Reykjavík, as well as co-curator of the festival Sláturtíð.
└ from 21 — Animated Notation


This often requires presenting the music as moving graphics on computer screens.
└ from 22 — Anitation


His works can often be regarded as composition, performance, sculpture and indictment.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


His work is described as conceptual music.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


He works as a lecturer in music theory, ear training and electronic music at the Rostock Academy of Music and Theater, the Detmold Academy of Music, the Hanover University of Music and Drama and the Hamburg University of Music and Drama.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


If such a fraction can still be labelled as music, it can still be linked to the original and the performing artist in terms of financial compensation for use.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Besides the share prices, some other statistics were used, such as the number of American soldiers killed in Iraq.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


For much less money than Kreidler himself received as a commission, he had pieces ready for concert that were made for him in China and India.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


We asked Johannes to do a reading about his practice as a composer during the event we organised around music and capitalism.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


This piece is to be seen as a plunder phonic composition in extremis.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


An ensemble of Arduino-powered prepared record players is built as an instrumentation to play an intimate selection from a family archive of popular music, 'A set of records carefully shipped home from a country at war forty years ago.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


Stained by the passage of time, scratched, with their covers eaten by moths, the records are signed and dated; they exist as passive witnesses of a displacement in time and space.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


Also the way in which she approaches the technical implementation of possibilities to program the record players is interesting, especially regarding, for example, the idea of 'schematics as a score'.
└ from 25 — Ana Guedes


Creation myths, such as in the Hopi and Navajo traditions, often centre around a grandmother spider figure who wove the night sky with her silk.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


There are spider figures in West African, Akan and Caribbean myths personifying the spider as a trickster.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


Arachne, a disturber of the status quo, is thought of as one of the first feminist authors.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


These actions are complicated and tenuous, as most human relations with companion species are.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


The recordings I make of the webs are an act of commemoration, and as Myers and Husk propose, 'This requires reading with our sense attuned to stories told in otherwise muted registers.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


Bas encouraged her to contact DE PLAYER as she was occupied with developing a machine that produces sound through the process of reading spider webs.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


The idea of a spider web as a score was also very closely aligned with the 'Pushing Scores' project.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


ORE by BJ Nilsen This work by BJ Nilsen can be seen as an observing documentary and is related to time-lapse filmmaking.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In the final processing of the sound, he uses the facets of mining as different sound tracks.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Thus, different layers of time are presented, from slowly unfolding sounds that represent a deep geological time, to sounds of transport, to the kind of sounds that we recognise as science fiction to indicate the future.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


For example, in the composition radio broadcasts from space are used as well as a recoding of the probe that has ended up on an asteroid.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The musique concrète, as developed by Henry at GRM, was made by magnetic tape.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It made him realise how closely he was actually involved in the process of iron ore, and how his development as an artist was shaped thanks to iron ore.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


I also worked with stone as an instrument, striking and recording it.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In that way I present different layers of time, from slowly unfolding sounds that represent deep geological time, to sounds of transport, to the sort of sounds we recognise as science fiction to denote the future.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


This ungraspable void of deep time fascinates me: The time compressed in iron ore, the coal that started billions of years ago as organic material, the gold flecked asteroid far away in space, or the more recent 'slambanken' in Kirkenes – a manmade landscape of unusable slag that might be mined in the future .
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


We trace out all the veins of the earth, and yet, living upon it, undermined as it is beneath our feet, are astonished that it should occasionally cleave asunder or tremble: As though, forsooth, these signs could be any other than expressions of the indignation felt by our sacred parent!
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Pliny the Elder, 'Naturalis Historia, book XXXIII', p. 77, data.perseus.org/citations/urn:cts:latinLit:phi0978.phi001.perseus-eng1:33.1 'If, as Novalis and many of his friends believed, stones, metals and rock strata amount to transcriptions of the earth's history, what better place to study that history than in the mines and caverns of the earth, where the entire record is preserved and exposed?
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


At this point the ancient conception of mines and mountain caverns as places of lapidary activity encounters a second folkoristic notion – that in the interior of mountains time stands still.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


I am drawn to the Arctic as a sound person because of its relative remoteness.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


It made me recognise again how close we are to the source of ore, and how my development as an artist was shaped by iron ore.' 'The iron ore is refined and filtered, making sure the pure magnetite comes out.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


The record can thus be considered as a potential composition, which is performed by the listener themselves through the aforementioned process.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


He has played a central role in the development of performing arts in Los Angeles, experimental music as a member of LAFMS, Japanese noise and pirate radio in Tokyo.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


We know Varia as a community based initiative which combines several knowledge bases in the interdisciplinary filed of music, programming, publishing, hacking, social interventions and critical positions, among others.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


Varia has developed a context and technical environment as a web-based archival publication.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


By emphasising this aspect of the machine as a musical entrepreneur earning his own income, the conditions of mechanised labour within the cultural industry, and its associated ethics, are investigated within this project.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


People who make black MIDIs are known as 'blackers'.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


However, there is no specific criteria for what is considered 'black', and as a result, finding an exact origin of black MIDI is impossible.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


DE PLAYER has always had a strong interest in emancipating publishing from its stereotypical understanding as merely making things public – an understanding that comes from an historical and economic media constraint linked to the print, software, music and film industries, and that has limited any form of meaningful, explorative, complementary or conflictual combinations between media in the field of cultural production.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


They were created with MIDI sequencers such as Music Studio Producer and Singer Song Writer, and played through MIDI players such as MAMPlayer and Timidity++.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


While black MIDIs of Japanese video game music and anime are still common, the genre has also begun spilling into modern-day pop songs, such as 'Wrecking Ball' by Miley Cyrus.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


English-language blackers have formed collaboration groups, such as the Black MIDI Team, where they make MIDI files and visuals together so they can be uploaded online sooner.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Blackers around the world have used software such as Synthesia, FL Studio, SynthFont, Virtual MIDI Piano Keyboard, Piano From Above, MIDITrail, vanBasco Karaoke Player, MIDIPlayer (Java program), MAMPlayer, Music Studio Producer, Singer Song Writer, Tom's MIDI Player, TMIDI and Timidity++ to create black MIDIs.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


According to California-based blacker TheTrustedComputer, black MIDI was intended as more of a remix style than an actual genre, and derived from the idea of 'bullet hell' shoot 'em up games, which involved 'so many bullets at a time your eyes can't keep up.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Black MIDI has also been considered the digital equivalent, as well as a response to composer Conlon Nancarrow's use of the player piano, which also involved experimenting with several thick notes to compose intricate pieces without hands.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


It has garnered acclaim from journalists, bloggers and electronic musicians, with many noting it as a distinctive and engaging genre thanks to how regular piano notes are combined to make new, abstract sounds not heard in many styles of music, as well as the visuals representing the notes.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


Hackaday's Elliot Williams spotlighted the style as ironic, given that the fast-paced arpeggios and 'splatter-chords', developed with a restricted number of voices, come together to make other tones that lead to a piano sounding more like a chiptune and less like an actual piano.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


For the release event only John Nixon could be present, as Julian unfortunately died at young age and Marco was primarily active as a visual artist.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


From this perspective, his live performances can also be considered as black mass implosions.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


As a musician, Fusinato explores the notion of noise as music, using the electric guitar and associated electronics to improvise intricate, wide-ranging and physically affecting frequencies.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Serial in form, each work uses an existing cultural document – a twentieth or twenty-first century avant-garde music score – as the formal, material and conceptual basis for a set of actions or interventions.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


In these works, treated by Fusinato as propositions for new noise compositions, the qualities of each individual note and their relation to those around them are effectively compressed into a single point of intense concentration.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


Fusinato's intervention into the scores therefore visualises and proposes the possibility of a dialectical energy running through the original work that has a political dimension as much as an artistic one – a relentless propensity to both destruction and expressive creation in the single action, or, in this case, to the production of noise.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


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