[x] In ▶

Sentences that have In in common :


In his lecture, Douglas Kahn discards old categories of sound and performance and replaces them with a new category of ‘energy’, which operates within the bigger narratives of ecology and other sensitivities.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


In the early- to mid-twentieth century, the abstract developments in the visual arts played a vital role in fostering new approaches to the question of music notation and contemporary avant-garde music.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


In an attempt to redefine this concept, we will be compiling a programme in which artists, musicians, theoreticians and practitioners are invited to participate.
└ from 01 — Pushing Scores Overview


In his work, Colson constantly questions the relationship with the audience and is also strongly interested in mythology and the authentic (or not) mystique of the artist's existence, which he usually explores in his performances.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


In addition, Colson explores the commercial side of the art world and the economic consequences of artistry.
└ from 05 — Wiels Artbook Fair


It looks like a game of Four In A Row, totally appealing to get your hands on it.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


In this way you would end up with all different records, each one an original.
└ from 06 — Principium 2.0 Publication


In an attempt to redefine this concept, we will be compiling a programme in which artists, musicians, theoreticians and practitioners are invited to participate.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In their audiovisual works, Telcosystems research the relation between the behavior of programmed numerical logic and the human perception of this behavior, aiming at an integration of human expression and programmed machine behavior.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In their audiovisual works, Telcosystems research the relation between the behavior of programmed numerical logic and the human perception of this behavior, aiming at an integration of human expression and programmed machine behavior.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


For the 'PUSHING' event, Derek will do a reading entitled 'Schematic as Score: Uses and Abuses of the (In)Deterministic Possibilities of Sound Technology', and after that he will do a live set based on researching analogue visuals with the oscilloscope.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In the case of the 'prepared record', the record or musical piece is not used as a reproductive technique.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In contrast to the composer or musician who perceives the record first and foremost as a vehicle transporting his or her musical ideas, here the interest lies especially in the optical/sculptural, as well as the acoustic presence and the compression of an idea when working with the playback possibilities and impossibilities of recording techniques.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In his article 'New Plasticism in Music: Possibilities of the Gramophone', László Moholy-Nagy said that it lies in the peculiarity of human nature that: The abuse and misunderstanding [of the record form] are necessary to gain results.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In other words, this means that reproduction (repetitions of already existing relations) without richer viewpoints from the special standpoint of creative production can, only in the best cases, be considered as a virtuosic opportunity.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In 1989 the 'Broken Music' exhibition was held in Berlin at DAAD gallery with work by, among others, Nam June Paik, John Cage, Milan Knížák and Christian Marclay.
└ from 07 — Pu-sh-ing-Sco-res Event


In reaction to the dematerialisation of music (the general disappearance of music released in its physical form), the artists of the ARTKILLART label roster refocus their releases as material objects.
└ from 10 — Valentina Vuksic


In the eleventh century, the Italian Guido of Arezzo, one of the most important founders of musical notation, developed a scale consisting of six notes: ut, re, mi, fa, sol, la.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


In the eleventh century, the Italian music theorist Guido of Arezzo developed an ascending scale consisting of six-notes: ut, re, mi, fa, sol and la.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


In the eleventh century, Guido van Arezo introduced the staff with four lines (this is still in use).
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


In the middle of the thirteenth century, Peter de Cruce came to a notation in which the relative duration of each note is indicated by the form of the note.
└ from 11 — Para-phonic Poly-disco


In his 2002 essay 'Musical Theories in Graphic Design', Bladel discussed the subject of graphic notation within a broader field of theory formation in contemporary music.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


In it he transposed compositional methodologies of the avant-gardists in the twentieth century to graphic design methodologies, for instance, by understanding Steve Reich's phase shifting technique through the lens of design.
└ from 13 — Remco van Bladel


http://macumbista.net Derek Holzer gave a lecture titled 'Schematic as Score: Use and Abuse of the (In)Deterministic Possibilities of Sound Technology'.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


In it he considers it axiomatic that, for every work of art that must be considered experimental, the possibility of failure must be built into its process.
└ from 14 — Derek Holzer


In 2011, Derek Holzer wrote an essay on this issue, which has since been published on the Internet as a downloadable PDF called 'VAGUE TERRAIN 19'.
└ from 15 — Schematic as Design


In the early 1960s, the composer Morton Subotnik employed engineer Don Buchla to help him create 'the music of the future'.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


In 1967, the Sony Portapak revolutionised video by taking the camera out of the television studio and into the hands of amateurs and artists.
└ from 16 — Tektronix Oscilloscope Music


In a multicultural situation, abstract sounds are forms of recognition; then there is, for example, music.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


In addition to the all-dominating impact of the music industry, which determines lifestyle at the level of confection, all sorts of de-mass-splintering genres are forming on the periphery of the musical firmament.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


In our opinion, this area is an important one, especially in experimental sound, in the lecture-form and in the visual arts.
└ from 20 — Concrete Poetry


In that way, the most irregular things can become very intelligible.
└ from 22 — Anitation


In the context of an experimental music notation, seeking to make an instrumental gesture of silence, how can we draw incipience?
└ from 23 — Silence


In a thirty-three second piece, he processed 70,200 quotations of foreign works, all of which he submitted individually via forms to the German Buma Stemra (GEMA).
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In this piece, too, reference is made to the borderline areas of copyright, and credits composers and copyright holders mentioned by the respective companies instead of Kreidler himself.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In September 2008 a piece of press advertised his action ‘Product Placements’, with which he wanted to initiate a discussion on copyright and the height of creation in music.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In a thirty-three second piece of music, he processed 70,200 quotes of foreign works, proceeding to individually enrolled each one at the GEMA.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


How Could You) Bring Him Home' by Eamon ''(I'm Gonna Be) 500 Miles' by The Proclaimers with Brian Potter & Andy Pipkin '(Let Me Be Your) Teddy Bear' by Elvis Presley with The Jordanaires ''(You Want To) Make A Memory' by Bon Jovi '1234' by Feist '1973' by James Blunt '2 Hearts' by Kylie Minogue '3's & 7's' by Queens Of The Stone Age '4 Am Forever' by Lostprophets '4 In The Morning' by Gwen Stefani '505' by Arctic Monkeys 'A Bad Dream' by Keane 'A Big Hunk O' Love' by Elvis Presley With The Jordanaires 'A Day In The Life' by Larrikin Love 'A Moment Like This' by Leona Lewis 'A Never Ending Dream' by Cascada 'A Public Affair' by Jessica Simpson 'A Whole New World' by Katie Price & Peter Andre 'About You Now' by Sugababes 'About Your Dress' by The Maccabees 'Acceptable In The 80s' by Calvin Harris 'Acrylic' by The Courteeners 'Adagio For Strings' by DJ Tiesto 'Ain't No Party' by Orson 'Alarm Clock' by The Rumble Strips 'Alfie' by Lily Allen 'All Good Things (Come To An End)' by Nelly Furtado 'All I Got' by Newton Faulkner 'All I Need To Know' by Emma Bunton 'All I Want For Christmas Is You' by Mariah Carey 'All My Friends' by LCD Soundsystem 'All She Wrote' by Ross Copperman 'Almost Easy' by Avenged Sevenfold 'Always On My Mind' by Elvis Presley 'Amazing' by Seal 'America' by Razorlight 'An American Trilogy' by Elvis Presley 'An End Has A Start' by Editors 'Anarchy In The UK' by The Sex Pistols 'Angel On My Shoulder' by Gareth Gates 'Annie Let's Not Wait' by Guillemots 'Anonymous' by Bobby Valentino feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


Eric Lumiere 'Any Dream Will Do' by Lee Mead 'Anything' by JoJo 'Anything Can Happen In The Next Half Hour' by Enter Shikari 'Apologize' by Timbaland feat.
└ from 24 — Johannes Kreidler


In Japan there's a focus on the lure of the spider, where it is sometimes likened to a prostitute.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


In actuality, they are visual representations of the spider's consciousness (who can forget Dr. Peter Witt’s experiments with drug use on spiders and their resulting webs).
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


In searching I began imagining where I would make a web, and then marvelling when I would find one in the most unlikely place, which only enchants me further into the world of spiders and webs and mythology.
└ from 26 — Helga Jakobson


In addition, it places itself in the tradition of electro acoustic music and 'musique concrète' – a French music movement that makes use of everyday sounds that are processed with the help of electronics into compositions and sound collages.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In it he found the fragility of mining processes and the impact that mining activities have on the population and their biotope.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In the final processing of the sound, he uses the facets of mining as different sound tracks.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In this way, the work creates a third space that belongs to the individual listener and that arises from the interaction between the original space and the imaginary space, created by the composition, the sound processing and the perception of the listener.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Ore 'In ore different layers of time are overlapping, from the deep time of geology to the superfast time of our current economy and the future.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


Source: http://www.newcriticals.com/deep-mining-deep-time/page-3 Mineral commodities used in mobile devices: Gallium (from bauxite), Germanium (from sphalerite) Graphite Indium (from sphalerite) Lithium (from amblygonite, petalite, lepidolite and spodumene) Platinum Potassium (from langbeinite, sylvite and sylvinite) Rare-earth elements (like bastnäsite, loparite, monazite and xenotime) Sand Silicon (from quartz) Silver (from argentite and tetrahedrite) Tantalum (from columbite and tantalite) Tin (from cassiterite) Tungsten (from scheelite and wolframite) Source: https://pubs.usgs.gov/gip/0167/gip167.pdf Chemical structure of the products of Sydvaranger mine, Kirkenes: Fe – 68% SiO2 – 5.00 Al2O3 – 0.30 S – 0.08 P – 0.01 Mn – 0.05 Na2O – 0.01 K2O – 0.03 CaO – 0.35 MgO – 0.45 H2O – 8.00 Size of the product: Over 0.15mm – less than 0.2% 0.053mm–0.15mm – less than 20% Under 0.053mm – up to 80% Source: http://sydvarangergruve.no/produkt 'In mining there are two types of waste.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In that way I present different layers of time, from slowly unfolding sounds that represent deep geological time, to sounds of transport, to the sort of sounds we recognise as science fiction to denote the future.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In a sense, you cannot not bring out those relations: How a society depends on mining and how it affects it .
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In practice it's quite mathematical, but it still it is part of the sound world too.
└ from 27 — BJ Nilsen


In the mid-1980s Duncan began pirate radio and television broadcasting with his own custom-built portable channels, operating illegally from the roofs of apartment buildings in central Tokyo and from an abandoned American military hospital near Sagamihara.
└ from 28 — John Duncan


In an ongoing performance unexpected correlations will be produced between the items in the archive and the physical surroundings in which they are represented.
└ from 29 — Niek Hilkmann


In that sense, there is never a perfect reproduction but always an interpretation.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


In its beginning years, black MIDIs were represented visually with traditional two-stave piano sheet music, and contained a number of notes only in the thousands.
└ from 30 — Black Midi


In 'Spectral Arrows', Fusinato arrives at the venue when it opens for business, sets up his equipment facing a wall and proceeds to play for the whole day until the end of business hours.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


In this project, he appropriates scores of avant-garde composers and connects each note with one arbitrary point on the horizon.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


In these works, treated by Fusinato as propositions for new noise compositions, the qualities of each individual note and their relation to those around them are effectively compressed into a single point of intense concentration.
└ from 31 — Marco Fusinato


a b o u t t h i s a r c h i v e
l i s t o f i t e m s
G e n e r a t e s c o r e !